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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Apache Releases OpenOffice 3.4
  • PC-BSD 9.1 installer preview
  • Download the Creative Suite 6!
  • "Good on ya' Mozilla", says Sophos about Firefox
  • Deadly 30, New Survival Horror Zombie Game
  • The Biggest Problem For A Linux PC Vendor
  • Mozilla Hiring Senior Product Manager
  • The Overhead of KDE Software
  • Doom 3 Progresses On OpenGL ES 2.0, EGL
  • Should Apache abandon OpenOffice?

few leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Getting started with Linux commands
  • Linux-libre
  • What on earth is Dracut?
  • Mozilla’s Mitchell Baker on Being the Alternative
  • 10 GNOME Shell Extensions to Install
  • Protect Your BSD – BSD Magazine (May 2012)
  • Rosa Marathon 2012lts
  • Cinnamon Desktop Review | LAS | s21e08

some mixed leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Kernel Log: Coming in 3.4 (Part 2)
  • Linux From Scratch Part Two
  • LibreOffice 3.5.3 Released
  • A history of Mozilla browsers design
  • How to enforce password complexity on Linux
  • Desktop: Debian vs. CentOS
  • The Most Awesome, Least-Advertised Fedora 17 Feature
  • Future of the Desktop Market
  • Why Linux Sucks & Why Linux Does Not Suck Videos
  • Linux Outlaws 263, 264
  • Debian Project News - April 30th
  • 4 things to do after installing Bodhi
  • EA talks at Ubuntu Developer Summit
  • A review of The Linux Command Line
  • openSUSE - the upstream of SUSE Linux Enterprise
  • Moore's Law Nearing Collapse, Says Physicist
  • SoundBox Another GTK Multimedia player

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Getting Started Guide for LibreOffice 3.4
  • Review Sunflower twin panel file manager for Linux
  • Beefy Miracle Beta Review
  • What's the Deal With Red Hat?
  • Slackware Plays Nicer Than Ubuntu With Humble Bundle
  • Unsettings: Ubuntu Unity Desktop Tweaking Tool
  • Linux Outlaws 262 - Leisure Suit Larry Goes to Court
  • A New GLSL Backend For Doom 3
  • Many FSF Priority Projects Still Not Progressing
  • How to set up Raspberry Pi
  • TechTip: Unlock More Space in Linux
  • Devil Live twins of OpenBSD: the project is kicking
  • Opera gets new icon
  • Changing from Nouveau to Nvidia Graphics Drivers on LMDE 64-bit
  • Replace Oxygen with ROSA theme on any KDE-powered distribution
  • systemd Status Update
  • Nitro Task Manager Brings New Themes

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 18 Might Be A Frankfurter Or Spherical Cow
  • 3 Open-Source Benchmarking Tools
  • Linux Tycoon Online Launched
  • A look at the new Plasma Active File Browser
  • Latest Linux Mint News
  • Fedora 17 + Xfce 4.10
  • 5 user-friendly applications you could be using now
  • How to create Linux live multi-boot setups - Tutorial
  • openSUSE Factory switched to GCC 4.7
  • Arduino Uno on Debian 6 Squeeze Stable
  • How High Can Red Hat Fly?
  • FreeBSD 8.3 introduces new features
  • Heinlein Support Becomes openSUSE Project Sponsor
  • Tweaking KDE's KWin For Linux Gaming Performance
  • Oracle Linux: The Past, Present and Future Revealed
  • An OS in the Public Interest - a Mandriva Linux Foundation?
  • The Humble Botanicula Bundle

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Avadon: The Black Fortress On Gameolith for Linux
  • Bridge Linux 2012
  • Government of Malaysia Continues to Increase Usage of FLOSS
  • New package search on software.opensuse.org
  • KDE 4.8.2 Maintenance Release Out — Grab it
  • How To Fix Broken Packages In Ubuntu Or Debian
  • GCC 4.8 Aims To Switch To C++ Mode By Default
  • Automatically Lock Your Computer
  • Tip en Tricks about RPM Commands
  • Early Easter present in Fedora 17 beta
  • 6 Dropbox Tips and Tricks for Linux Users
  • BerliOS Projects Saved, Moving to SourceForge
  • How to create an animated gif from a video using mplayer
  • Open Build Service Delivers Website Integration
  • Floss Weekly Episode 206: Chamilo
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 449

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Review: “The Linux Command Line”
  • How to Back Up Your Linux System With Back In Time
  • Clear recent documents in Gnome 3
  • Why Not Open Source?
  • Securing GNOME 3.2.1 openSUSE 12.1
  • Introduction to AnoN-1mOS a new Linux Distribution
  • Nifty Vim Tricks
  • Reset account password (Ubuntu Linux) without CD
  • Stop An Application From Being Updated in Ubuntu
  • rc.local in Fedora
  • Open Source in Automotive Industry Rising
  • Linux Outlaws 259 - Turn to the Purple Side

recent leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux 'internet of things' gizmo ships
  • Ex-Googler Fears Google's Greed, Protects People From It
  • Dell Linux Engineers work over 5000 bugs with Red Hat
  • Enea adds Linux to OS offering
  • ‘Moniz’ gets a logo
  • TACC Releases Open Source Display Tiling Package
  • HP says it will commit to Linux as market share rises
  • Linux 3.4 will support GeForce GTX 680 and Southern Islands GPUs
  • Why Linux Needs Malware Protection
  • Android Apps in Linux Changes Everything
  • PCLinuxOS Magazine Openbox Special Edition

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Five easy-to-use Linux encryption tools
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 "Kepler" On Linux? (on Windows)
  • Nouveau Project Has Huge Surprises Today
  • gnome 3 got my goat
  • Reality Check on Ubuntu's Enterprise Claims
  • Kernel Log: Drivers for new Radeon GPUs
  • Master Linux Now! 2012 - On Sale Now
  • 2012 Will be The Year of The GNU/Linux Desktop
  • Commodore outs Linux-running Amiga Mini desktop
  • Carla Schroder: Whoever controls technology controls society
  • Getting the integrated fingerprint reader on my laptop to work in Linux
  • Kubuntu and the state of free consumer software
  • LibreOffice 3.4.6 Released
  • Ubuntu 12.04 Development update
  • Xubuntu 12.04 Beta Screenshots
  • Bodhi Linux 1.4.0 Released
  • Drupal Open Source is Built on Passion (and soon Symfony)
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 447

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Puzzle Game 'Me And My Shadow' Is Quite Challenging
  • Dear Esther: A Source Engine Game On Linux
  • Talk Of GCC 5.0 To Be Modular, More Like LLVM
  • Simply Linux improves and polishes
  • Whoops, There's A Big Problem For Wayland GTK+
  • Distrowatch Top 20-somethings
  • GloboNote: A Sticky Notes Tool on Steroids
  • Linpus Lite Desktop 1.7 screen shot preview
  • My Dream Tablet Running GNU/Linux: The LINTAB
  • The Children of Linux
  • openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 2 Screenshot Tour
  • GNOME 2 vs. GNOME 3
  • A Linux Game That's Still Not Selling Well
  • 5 Ways To Make Linux Boot Faster
  • Dell Surveys Customers on GNU/Linux
  • Drupal's Plan for Open Source CMS Success
  • Interview: Richard Stallman
  • Bryan Hates Freedom | LAS | s21e01
  • Linux Outlaws 256 - The Beards are Coming!!!
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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
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  • Kube in Randa
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  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
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    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

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Ubuntu and Linux Mint Development

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  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter 519
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