Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

News

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KWin turns 12
  • Wireless sharing with Plasma NM 0.9 (part 2)
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 14th August
  • "F" as in freedom, and in fun, and in the future
  • Jumping between operating systems
  • OpenELEC, a media center based on XBMC
  • Over 20% of new active domains run WordPress
  • How a Linux Distribution Review Should be Done
  • openSUSE-LXDE logo contest starting now
  • Behold The Power Cog [Minor Oneiric update alert]
  • How system update can break love
  • Full Circle Podcast 23: OGGCamp Part One
  • Marples-black – gtk2/3 dark style themes for Gnome
  • Future of Python programming language on a Linux platform
  • Thoughts about Network Trancparency
  • Dirk 2 Testers needed
  • National meet on Free Open Source Software
  • Revisited: openSUSE 11.4 GNOME
  • Yes, GNU/Linux is on Desktops and Notebooks and

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Dead Cyborg Brings Excitement, At First
  • Asylum
  • Trine 2 New Co-op Trailer
  • Introducing Cobalt
  • Why 2011 Is The Year Of Open Source
  • Remote Wayland Server Project: Does It Work Yet?
  • Linux Mint Debian 201108 RC (Gnome and Xfce) released
  • San Diego open-source software makers meet up and geek out
  • Linux and multi-form factor platforms
  • Will Nokia Ever Realize Open Source Is Not a Panacea?
  • SFLC Co-Hosts The Community Distribution Patent Policy FAQ with Debian
  • maddog: Not-So-Angry Birds Need to Flock Together
  • Beginner’s Guide to Shell Scripting 4: Conditions & If-Then Statements
  • Android GPLv2 termination worries: one more reason to upgrade to GPLv3
  • Copenhagen hospitals use LibreOffice
  • NVIDIA Releases 285.03 Beta Linux Driver
  • Red Hat CEO thinks the desktop is becoming a legacy application
  • Zentyal The Linux Small Business Server
  • Linux Outlaws 223 - Did You Say Orgy?
  • Aug 16: #147 Computer America #41
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 3 Episode 16

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Most Popular Open Source Platform Isn’t
  • Ubuntu Wallpaper Update
  • 4 way to administer Linux with a web interface
  • The Community of One
  • Photobomb released
  • SPDX spec standardizes open source compliance reporting
  • FLOSS Weekly 178: Synergy
  • Blender at Siggraph 2011
  • Linux Journal's Reader's Choice Awards 2011
  • Linux Wallpaper App ‘Wallch’ Adds Unity Support
  • Telepath RPG: Servants of God Released
  • OggCamp11 – Fear & Loathing In Farnham
  • 245 Desktop Summit Attendee Names to Find
  • openSUSE Conference 2011 Schedule Available
  • Review: Linux Mint 11 "Katya" LXDE
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 416

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Linux 3.1 Kernel Supports Wake On Wireless LAN
  • Five reasons why the PC is not dead
  • stat Command
  • Open Source Reality Check
  • Research identifies benefits of the open source software market
  • SFLC Oggcast: Legal Basics for Developers
  • Longterm kernel proposal signals ongoing Linux growth
  • Hacker Evolution Duality Released !
  • In a tough job market, your open source experience may be an asset in more ways than one
  • Non-profit Group Releases Open Source Mesh WiFi Network Software
  • Why Intel & Canonical Should Make A Deal for Ubuntu MeeGo
  • HowTo: run Flickering Lights on Linux
  • All Your BASH Are Belong To Us
  • Seven Points About Ereaders You Should Know Before Buying
  • No Time to Explain Soon
  • Interview: Kate Stewart, Ubuntu Release Manager at Canonical
  • Survivors of Ragnarök, New Linux Game Inspired by Dwarf Fortress

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Open Surface vs Open Core
  • Has Microsoft defeated Linux?
  • Building a personal data locker
  • 16 Cool Linux Commands
  • KDE release team changes
  • Mozilla Readies Its New Public License
  • PCManFM-Mod To Be In Parted Magic 6.7
  • Peter Brown and Stormy Peters Directors of Software Freedom Conservancy
  • Lots of stable kernel updates
  • Dead Cyborg Ep 1 Linux download
  • Future of the -longterm kernel releases
  • Programmer's Life: The Freelance
  • Romanian Unreasonableness
  • Opera Mini vs Opera Mobile: What’s The Difference?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Big distributions, little RAM 3
  • Getting Work Done | LAS | s18e02
  • HowTo: Microkorg XL Sound Editor on Linux
  • Dragon Player – KDE Video player focus on simplicity
  • Disastrous inventions: they said it would never work... and they were right
  • Help Fund “In The Dark”
  • Wireless on Plasma Active MeeGo image
  • Easy Ubuntu 64bit DLNA Server Setup + Bonus MKV Converter Script
  • Cnotify, get notifications for console events
  • Linux 3.1-rc2 Is A Fairly Calm Release
  • OpenSuSE 11.4 KDE: Where Desktop Environment Matters
  • Solving the Sunday Puzzle with coreutils
  • Setting up a new project – 4 tools you can’t miss the first time around

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Installing sSMTP MTA (Mail Transfer Agent)
  • Manage & Compare Fonts Easily With Font Manager
  • Custom Lookit panel icon to match Faenza icon set
  • Easily Share Files between Linux Machines using sFTP
  • 6 ways to map your mind with Linux
  • Ubo Iconset : Ballpoint pen made, Handmade Iconset for Ubuntu
  • Comprehensive Unity guide ready
  • Firefox 6 breaks out ahead of schedule, gets official August 16th
  • Hacker Evolution Duality - Free playable beta available
  • Free Software and homeschooling: reports from the trenches
  • No one cares about license agreements
  • Ubuntu Gnome Wallpapers
  • We have C++11
  • Jenkins for Ubuntu Oneiric: Call for Testing
  • Apt-gentoo? Gentoo-apt! Hah!
  • Redhat 5.1 Redneck Internationalization
  • String freeze for GNOME 3.2 in 3 weeks
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 7th August
  • Linux Q&A ; Why I Play for Both Teams
  • Windys 1.5.0 Released

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Ultimate Edition 3.0 "Gamers" Released
  • Installing Linux on a 386 laptop
  • Superdrug takes out common cold, other viruses
  • awesome Linux cheat sheet
  • Cardinal Quest
  • How eBay Leveraged Open Source to Streamline Transaction Processing
  • I installed sabayon 6 what now?
  • High-calibre ebook management
  • Software RAID in Linux – a small tutorial

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Unity Update Part 2: Music Lens, Indicator Changes And More
  • Does linux Need Defrag?
  • FreeCAD – Free 3d CAD application for Linux
  • Interactive SVG Mockups with Inkscape & Javascript
  • Spending Money: VMWare
  • Plasma Active, the stage is yours
  • QEMU 0.15 Brings Several New Features
  • Kate Turning 10 Years Old
  • Novell and Nortel Patent Sales Boost Linux Group Membership
  • The IBM PC is 30 today
  • Helena The 3rd Video Review and Updates
  • Thursday in Fedora
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 415

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME 3
  • GNU Xnee 3.10 (‘Heron’) released
  • The “App Model” and the Web
  • Dragonplayer - Simple video player
  • BEEP-Game Review and Gameolith
  • plasma active & contour demo
  • A selection of photographs from some of RMS's past events
  • Linux 3.x Matures as GNOME Fork Calls 'Grow'
  • Wallpapers from... heaven?
  • Wednesday in Fedora
  • It works: Plasma now looks up missing components through PackageKit
  • BSDanywhere: time machine
  • FLOSS Weekly 177: Delta3D
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more