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News

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Back In Time, a Free and Simple Backup Software
  • 7 Brilliant GNOME GTK Themes
  • I Hate Thunderbird 3.x
  • Test-driving Bordeaux 2.0.8
  • Top 20 Open Source Packages
  • Clam AntiVirus management tools
  • KMyMoney 4.5.1 stable version is out
  • A Linux server OS that's had 11 years to improve
  • Linux servers for Windows folk: go on, give it a bash
  • Linux Box Goes Live With Email
  • Context Toolbars in The Board
  • Polishing KGet and Friends
  • New: OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 5
  • New: OOo-DEV 3.x Developer Snapshot
  • LCDTV.net - New Online Magazine Using Drupal 6
  • Linux 2.6.37-rc2 Kernel Released; So Far Looks Painless
  • AMD Catalyst 10.11 Linux Driver Released
  • Hard Lessons Learned: Malicious Ads on SourceForge
  • New Opera address field, mouse gestures, and updated mail panel and extensions
  • Linux distros advance on the networking front
  • FLOSS Weekly 142: CentOS

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • In Defense of Bacon
  • WebYaST – now for openSUSE
  • Video: Gnome-Shell Update Nov 16 2010
  • Debian Women IRC Training Sessions
  • Viewing and Analysing music audio file - Sonic Visualiser
  • Command Line Fun: Magic 8 Ball in Your Terminal
  • Fedora Board Meetings, 12 & 15 Nov 2010
  • GNOME Terminal with Google search support
  • The lesson of Google Android fail
  • PCLinuxOS LXDE Review and Screenshots
  • Slamd64 to be discontinued
  • OOo Initializing an I-Team for the improvement of the ODF-icons
  • Red Hat Breaks Through Support at $40.87
  • 'Megafon Siberia implements Linux-based video call-centre'
  • Convirture and Canonical to Team Up
  • New openSUSE Package for packager: whohas

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Make your own games with Syntensity
  • Comments on Perens' Comments on Software Patents
  • Schmidt: Google Chrome OS 'a few months away'
  • Kmart debuts $180 Android tablet
  • GIMP's Van Gogh filter - Does something that nobody understands
  • Attn: Slackware 13.0 | Thunderbird Users
  • Top 10 Firefox Add-ons to Make Browsing Safe, Secure and Private
  • KNotify Plugins
  • 3 Triangle titans pile up billions in cash
  • KDE 4.4 on Slackware 13.1
  • F# development under Mac OS X and Linux
  • Ebay using Drupal
  • Introducing the Halls - Developers of Qimo 2.0
  • Fedora Board likely to reconsider SQLNinja, but should they?

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • VLC v1.1.5 released
  • Speed Limit: 75MPH. Ubuntu: 110MPH.
  • FlBurn - Optical disc burning software for Linux
  • x2vnc
  • Linux Mint 10 manual disk partitioning guide
  • Drupal 7.0 Beta 3 released
  • Release of KGraphViewer, version 2.1.1
  • Burg manager app updated with new themes, new features
  • Quick and easy printer sharing in GNOME
  • Ubuntu 10.10 for the O2 Joggler
  • More Thoughts On Fedora 14
  • My first podcast - Switching from CentOS to Slackware
  • Linux Basement: Episode 63 - Just Us, Just News

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Firefox 4, How To Undo The Changes
  • Nautilus Extensions – Right-Click Menu to Extend Functionality
  • OpenSearch in Rekonq
  • Parsing Bazaar Logs with PHP
  • Nautilus Extensions – Add “open in terminal”,”set as wallpaper” in Menu
  • The Java crisis and what it means for developers
  • Monitoring Processes
  • kde e.v. board meeting in nijmegen
  • Turning Kate into a Prolog IDE

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ever Wondered WTF Gnome vs Ubuntu?
  • Introducing KDualAction
  • Hacked Kinect Handles Photos, Minority Report Style
  • Ten KDE tools for all types of Linux user (rerun)
  • 8 Beautiful Linux/Ubuntu Wallpaper Packs
  • Introducing students to the world of open source: Day 2
  • Novell Operations Center
  • "Modern Perl" available
  • OLPC Samoa School Deployments
  • Mini PC touted for upgradeable design
  • UI Application for create and verify md5, crc32 and other checksum - PySum
  • X.Org 7.6 Release Candidate 1 Is Finally Here
  • Indian Open Standards Policy Finalized
  • Pinguy OS 10.10 Has Been Released
  • Beta 2 Of The Enlightenment Foundation Libraries
  • Preview: Debian 6 "Squeeze" (Part 4: Standard)
  • Court Orders Michael Robertson to Pay Former Employee $300,000+
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2010.11.12
  • Linux Outlaws 175 - Clusterfork

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 3 Beautiful Conky Configurations
  • Some interesting stats about gentoo portage tree
  • The JooJoo Tablet is Officially Dead
  • One does not imply the other
  • Mozilla releases Firefox social networking extension
  • Back to the future
  • Is MySQL open core?
  • First day of Latinoware
  • Latinoware: first day
  • MeeGo 1.1 vs Ubuntu Netbook Edition: Comparative Review
  • ZaReason CEO Keynotes at FOSDEM
  • Deep Thoughts on Being a Geek
  • Banshee 1.9.0 released
  • openSUSE medical team releases stable version 0.0.6
  • Dungeon crawler game for IM-ME (and Linux)
  • Default Squeeze Artwork chosen
  • Fedora bars SQLNinja hack tool
  • Paul Frields: Insight into Insight
  • Linux Link Tech Show #375 11 10 10
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 21

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Adventures in Kubuntu: Day three
  • New: OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 4
  • MythTV 0.24 Brings A New OSD, HD Audio, Blu-ray
  • Burster, Web Browser Plugin for Playing Games, by Blender Project
  • Two New Tools in Snort
  • General Open Source NLE Round-Up
  • Getting my new Sandisk Sansa Fuze to work with gPodder
  • There Are Ever More Ways to Browse With No Name
  • What If You Threw a Proprietary Software Party and Nobody Came?
  • Security Scanner for Debian and Ubuntu - Buck security
  • Open source organisation needed for new IP laws
  • Is Linux really free software?
  • Zik - Audio player based on gstreamer
  • Red Hat's Fedora 14 Boasts Updated Development Tools, etc
  • openSUSE at Latinoware
  • Why should I ever bother filing another bug?
  • From stability comes stagnation
  • Help Improve Ubuntu on ‘Bug Day' Tomorrow
  • Q&A: Dr Alan Bowyer and open source 3D printing
  • the_source Episode 12 "Mini" Released
  • FLOSS Weekly 141: Membase

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mozilla: Firefox 4 Beta 7 coming Wednesday
  • 'A New Start' GTK Theme is Incredibly Cool!
  • Recent Activity… uh.. activities
  • Epidermis theme Manager - Change the Look and Feel of Ubuntu
  • Some Small Progress On Linux GPU Laptop Switching
  • Linux Plumbers Conference/Gnome Summit Recap
  • Fedora 14 Installation Process
  • openSUSE Forum has New News Editor
  • Open source education still needed
  • Nicholas Negroponte: Laptops Work
  • Clonezilla Live open source clone system updated
  • One plasmoid 3 platforms
  • It's clamfs chowder time
  • Ubuntu 11.04 Daily ISO Available For Download
  • Oscar winning video editor ‘Lightworks’ not coming to Linux until ‘late 2011′
  • Is the source of open source the root of all evil
  • I'll Show You Mine, You Show Us Yours
  • Linux support for Matrox Radient eCL Camera Link frame grabber
  • Set your screen resolution higher than its default with NewRez
  • Michael Löffler is leaving Novell
  • Lessons learned from Symbian’s journey to open source and back
  • Keryx 1.0 to have multi project feature - a sneak peek
  • Shutter - a feature rich Screenshot Management Utility
  • Free as in Freedom: Episode 0x02: Needs of the Few

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The browser wars: side with Opera.
  • Shhh... Opera holds the web's most valuable secret
  • Fedora Scholarship Program Encourages Open Source Innovation
  • A Few Tips on Managing Access Remotely
  • Open core by the numbers
  • Smackdown: Linux on X64 Versus IBM i on Entry Power 7XXs
  • FSFLA: Linux kernel is "open core"
  • First peek at the new look ‘Do’ launcher (Gnome-do)
  • Remmina to be Ubuntu’s new remote desktop app
  • How do I compile my windows programs under Linux?
  • BetterMeans: a new app for running your organization the open source way
  • GNU Spotlight with Karl Berry (October 2010)
  • Video uploading/downloading to feature in Shotwell 0.8
  • Playing with EDID and rawhide
  • Five alternative apps for ALT+F2
  • Mageia Roadmap
  • Mandriva first to include virtualization technologies at the system level
  • Linux Alternative To Windows MultiPoint Server 2010 Goes Into Beta
  • KDEMU with Ian Monroe
  • Fedora Board Meeting, 8 Nov 2010
  • Icelandic developer receives Nordic Free Software Award
  • GNOME Shell 2.91.2 released
  • Procurement Jobs: Desktop Productivity Tools 'Key To Open Source'
  • Savvytek achieves Red Hat partnership in Saudi and Qatar
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Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

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    The Linux Kernel has a bug that causes containers that use veth devices for network routing (such as Docker on IPv6, Kubernetes, Google Container Engine, and Mesos) to not check TCP checksums. This results in applications incorrectly receiving corrupt data in a number of situations, such as with bad networking hardware. The bug dates back at least three years and is present in kernels as far back as we’ve tested. Our patch has been reviewed and accepted into the kernel, and is currently being backported to -stable releases back to 3.14 in different distributions (such as Suse, and Canonical). If you use containers in your setup, I recommend you apply this patch or deploy a kernel with this patch when it becomes available. Note: Docker’s default NAT networking is not affected and, in practice, Google Container Engine is likely protected from hardware errors by its virtualized network.
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    Samuel Pitoiset began pushing his Gallium3D Mesa state tracker changes this morning for supporting compute shaders via the GL_ARB_compute_shader extension. Before getting too excited, the hardware drivers haven't yet implemented the support. It was back in December that core Mesa received its treatment for compute shader support and came with Intel's i965 driver implementing CS.
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    While FFmpeg has offered hardware-accelerated HEVC decoding using NVIDIA's VDPAU API since last summer, this support for the FFmpeg-forked libav landed just today. In June was when FFmpeg added support to its libavcodec for handling HEVC/H.265 video decoding via NVIDIA's Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix interface. Around that same time, developer Philip Langdale who had done the FFmpeg patch, also submitted the patch for Libav for decoding HEVC content through VDPAU where supported.

Unixstickers, Linux goes to Washington, Why Linux?

  • Unixstickers sent me a package!
    There's an old, popular saying, beware geeks bearing gifts. But in this case, I was pleased to see an email in my inbox, from unixstickers.com, asking me if I was interested in reviewing their products. I said ye, and a quick few days later, there was a surprise courier-delivered envelope waiting for me in the post. Coincidentally - or not - the whole thing happened close enough to the 2015 end-of-the-year holidays to classify as poetic justice. On a slightly more serious note, Unixstickers is a company shipping T-shirts, hoodies, mugs, posters, pins, and stickers to UNIX and Linux aficionados worldwide. Having been identified one and acquired on the company's PR radar, I am now doing a first-of-a-kind Dedoimedo non-technical technical review of merchandise related to our favorite software. So not sure how it's gonna work out, but let's see.
  • Linux goes to Washington: How the White House/Linux Foundation collaboration will work
    No doubt by now you've heard about the Obama Administration's newly announced Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP). You can read more about it on CIO.com here and here. But what you may not know is that the White House is actively working with the Linux and open source community for CNAP. In a blog post Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation said, “In the proposal, the White House announced collaboration with The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) to better secure Internet 'utilities' such as open-source software, protocols and standards.”
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RebeccaBlackOS 2016-02-08 Review. Why? Because it’s Friday.

These are the types of problems found in an independent distro build from scratch. I cannot understand how a system built on Debian could be this buggy and apparently have zero VM support which Debian comes with by default. I can take some solace in the fact that it was built by one person and that one person is a Rebecca Black fan but as far as a Linux Distribution is concerned there is not much here. Some could say “Well its not supposed to be taken as a serious Distribution.” True except it is listed and kept up with on DistroWatch therefor it should be held as a system ready distribution especially when it was not released as a beta or an RC. If this distribution is ever going to be considered a real platform it has a long way to go. I give it about as many thumbs down as the Rebecca Black Friday video. Read more

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