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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Desktop Sanity
  • Synapse 0.2.6 Released, Brings New Theme and Drag 'n' Drop Features
  • GNOME 3.0, Banshee 2.0 and Foresight Linux
  • Azulejo – User friendly window tilling
  • Test drive the whole Ubuntu archive with WebLive
  • Testing Writer documents rendering
  • Banshee sucketh the big one
  • Skype for Linux gets an update after almost 15 months
  • Google begins tablet version of Chrome OS
  • Smile becomes Mandriva partner
  • Puppy, Slax, and Puppy Slax
  • Eurocom Launches Dual Processor Phantom 4.0 Server-on-the-Go Solution
  • NetSupport Assist now available for Mac, Linux
  • AMD Puts Out A Catalyst Hot-Fix For Linux
  • Linux high availability group working on critical enterprise application stack
  • FLOSS Weekly 160: Open Source Software At The DoD
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 397
  • Surreal Gaming in 'Machinarium' Creator's Latest, 'Osada'

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS 2010 E17 Review
  • Wishlist for gnome (and shell) 3.2
  • Yahoo: The Linux Company
  • Dual boot adventures
  • Linux 2.6.39-rc2 Is Uncommonly Calm
  • There's a new sudo in town
  • Harvard Business Review: FOSS Has Reached Tipping Point
  • Focusing on what's important, not sensational
  • Screen queens: 7 dual-screen devices you can buy now
  • GIMP 2.8 release planning gets more transparent
  • 8 strange places to find USB ports
  • Nokia confirms Symbian no longer open source
  • Testing stable; stable testing
  • OSU, Intel Expand Open Source Education
  • The GNU/Linux-Adoption Algorithm!
  • New OOo Snapshot
  • 10,000-core Linux supercomputer built in Amazon cloud
  • MS's Monopoly Is Now So Bad That Even MS Employees Complain
  • IBM bullish on Linux, but will keep DB2 proprietary

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS 2010 Review
  • Lucid Puppy 5.2.5 Screenshots Tour
  • Review: System 76 Gazelle Professional Ubuntu Laptop
  • Brian Aker explains Memcached
  • Linphone- An Open Source SIP Phone
  • The compat-wireless dance
  • jnettop: Another network monitor
  • Graphical Desktop Wiki - Zim
  • Red Hat opens New Zealand office
  • Commodore 64 Gets Priced, Comes in 5 Models
  • Vote Beefy – seriously.
  • The history of the origin of grep command
  • Microsoft "A Little Puppy", We Should All Be So Lucky
  • Kicking Puppies or Giving Up on GNU/Linux Deskktops
  • Five more signs Linux is ready for mission-critical workloads
  • Must-have restartless Firefox add-ons
  • Linux Format issue 144 is on sale now
  • BSD Magazine 2011-04: FreeBSD: portability with VMware
  • SUSE Studio and Disters Recognized
  • new opera snapshot
  • Open source FusionDirectory forked from GOsa project
  • Two Linux-based NAS devices reach market

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 16 Might Be A Beefy Miracle
  • Cheese in The Board
  • Have Some Cheese with that Webcam
  • Same place, slightly different way
  • Freedom through a clear governance model
  • digiKam Tricks 3.0 Released
  • People of openSUSE: Per Jessen
  • The entropy factor
  • Few days with GNOME3
  • GNU GPL Version Three Adoption Rates
  • Rooting a Nook Color: Is it Worth It?
  • A Hot-Replace Server For Wayland Is Proposed
  • Linux Outlaws 199 - Hail to the King, Baby!
  • Penguin Computing overclocks Opterons for Wall Street
  • Stunt Rally 1.1 looking awesome
  • 120 Megabits/s
  • I'm loving open source in schools
  • Why being an approved loco team doesn’t actually matter a jot
  • Legacy should never be a burden
  • Government Procurement: Great Expectations for FOSS
  • Sony PS3 'Other OS' Litigation Update
  • Linux's Own 'Canterbury' Tale: Laughing, Wishing and Hoping
  • Spiral Knights Released
  • Debian wheezy: lots of fixes, new stuff

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 169 is out
  • Exploring Software—Getting a Hang of Zope’s Grok
  • LibreOffice
  • kernel weekly news – 02.04.2011
  • Music production in linux 3
  • Securing the future of openSUSE
  • Using a monome with Ubuntu Studio
  • Ubuntu 11.04 quick review & Screenshots Tour
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.04.01
  • KDE Commit Digest for 27 March 2011
  • Gwibber lens for Ubuntu Unity available; adds social awesome to the 11.04 desktop
  • end of an era: pygtk
  • Linux: Updating BIOS on an Old SCSI Controller

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Red Hat execs pushed hard for incentives
  • Introducing snapper: A tool for managing btrfs snapshots
  • Major security hole found in Linux kernel
  • A SCO Openserver to Red Hat Linux Conversion
  • 6 Linux Pranks for April Fools' Day
  • 10 Advanced Plugins, Features for gedit
  • Coming soon: PlayOnWindows, by the creators of PlayOnLinux
  • Announcing: Fedora Cheat Ball
  • Opera Speed Dial, now with crisp thumbnails
  • Questions For Ryan Gordon, The Linux Game Porter
  • Steam for Linux confirmed
  • The kde-www war: part 3
  • Linux Outlaws 198 - GNU/Linux Outlaws
  • Free Gamer = Freeware Gamer
  • New: OOo-DEV 3.x Developer Snapshot
  • Novell not phased by Red Hat changes
  • FR: Space agency to use Apache Commons Math
  • Fuduntu Weekly Update - Improving Terminal
  • Top five datacenter stories that sound like April Fool's, but aren't
  • VIDEO: Duke Nukem Vids Feature Jetpack, Poop
  • I am Jef Spaleta
  • Install Firefox 4 on Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE)

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Hardware review I
  • Google open source guru: 'Why we ban the AGPL'
  • Linux and ARM Power New 10-Inch Netbook
  • Ryan "Icculus" Gordon Will Be Talking This Weekend
  • Red Hat the Master Packager
  • BPEL engine on Red Hat's shopping list
  • OSI: The Open Source Road Ahead
  • It isn't open source if it doesn't pass "The patch test"
  • Swiss Supremes Re-invent Catch-22
  • Firefox 4 borked by Compiz bug in Linux
  • SNAFU—Situation Normal, All Fouled Up! | The Joy of Programming
  • the book was better
  • Postal III Pushed Back, Linux Fate Unknown
  • GNOME:Ayatana – being populated
  • Is Android FUD a forebearer of Linux-like success?
  • Announcing Penny Red
  • UK: Researchers say open source lowers costs, increases security
  • The Fuduntu Programming Challenge
  • ‘Creepy’ app threatens the privacy of social network users
  • Some Thoughts on Diaspora
  • Microsoft Gives Up, Says It Can't Win
  • Ballmer: Linux Still Like Cancer
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 396

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • So I deleted Windows – but why did I have it in the first place?
  • Document Freedom Day: UK releases Government ICT Strategy in .odt
  • Unchain Yourself from Proprietary Formats
  • Here's The Special AMD Present For Ubuntu Users
  • GnomeICU is no more
  • APM, and the value in Linux
  • A year of openSUSE Collaboration ahead
  • Texas Linufest is just around the corner
  • aseigo: the fun in banging our heads together
  • On the road to GNOME 3.0
  • Slitaz Linux 3.0- An awesome Linux distribution
  • Why Ubuntu Should Not Worry About Adobe Flash
  • Indicator Applet: Applet to mount CD/DVD
  • FOSS Development Is My Full-Time Job: Patricia Santana Cruz
  • Greplin open sources Python tools
  • Snapshot coming to Linux
  • LibreOffice Portable 3.3.2 Released
  • GNOME3 live image 0.3.1 released
  • FLOSS Weekly 159: Newspeak
  • Debian Release Team - Kicking off Wheezy

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME3 Live Image version 0.3.0 released
  • The Enlightened one is here-Bodhi Linux1.0.0
  • AMD Catalyst 11.3 Drops Support For Old X.Org
  • “Open Source Governance for your Organization”
  • For Cuba Open Source Is Not A Matter Of Choice
  • Open source for sale
  • Much Ado about Nothing – Except Choice
  • The Ubuntu Alien Conspiracy [Wallpaper]
  • Buy digiKam Tricks Book, Win a Bag of Photo Goodies
  • Free as in Freedom: Episode 0x0C
  • INT: ODF 1.2 is approved as a Committee Specification
  • MeeGo and Symbian: How Long Will the Bodies Stay Warm?
  • Vi Editing Mode for Bash
  • Open Source Software Tools And Directories: Where To Find Them

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New Features in digiKam 2.0: Versioning
  • openSUSE Release versioning – Poll on last three options
  • Build a device scalable user interface
  • gnome-color-manager and profiles
  • KMail Frustrations
  • GIMP in Google Summer of Code 2011
  • GNOME 3 Hackfest, Day One
  • Fedora 15 status and so on
  • Configuration management in Drupal 8
  • Computers in the Classroom
  • Too Bad, Mr. Ballmer! Your Flock Is Decreasing...
  • LM_Sensors 3.3 Brings More Sensory Goodness
  • The Day Firefox Left IE in the Dust
  • Android and the Kernel: It is Not that Simple
  • Installing Linux to a Gateway NV53 laptop, a tail of five distros
  • Firefox 4 includes new feature for thwarting web attacks
  • Menu Button inside Window Decorations
  • Geek Of The Week: Máirín Duffy
  • The Board 0.1.2
  • Scribes interesting remote editor
  • Java Gosling goes to Google
  • Debian and Arch sittin in a tree
  • Fedora 16 naming vote delay
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