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Filed under
  • secret sauce to rapid release apps in the enterprise
  • participate in openSUSE HCL Week
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.07.08
  • Scoregasm New Trailer
  • CentOS 6.0 Released to External Mirrors
  • Steel Storm: Burning Retribution 2.00.02814
  • Amarok 2.4.2 Beta 1 “Nightshade” Released
  • How open source tools can create balanced learning environments
  • Is Red Hat Breaking Out?
  • Oracle Expands Virtual Desktops for Linux
  • KDE Games: Towards an “Active” interface
  • openSUSE 11.4 KDE installation screen capture tour
  • Opera Next and auto-update
  • New Session Manager
  • Blender 2.5 HOTSHOT book review
  • Cool Dock for GNOME Shell: Unity 2D Launcher

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • Dungeons of Dredmor release date
  • Linux Network Video Recorders utilize 2 TB disks for storage
  • The Linux desktop should be an alternative to XP and not a religion
  • Investing In Open Source
  • Linux New Media to ship thousands of Fedora DVDs
  • Introducing Opera “Wahoo”
  • Xen, KVM and the Linux Choice
  • DAISHO Productivity Software for Linux
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 3 Episode 13
  • Red Hat Inc. Reports Operating Results (10-Q)
  • RHEV 3.0 management: No Windows, new opportunities
  • Improve Network Security with Open Source Monowall: Part 2
  • Whats in store for Minecraft

some odds & ends:

Filed under
  • FreeDOS 1.1 released – nostalgia
  • Debian Squeeze minimal text based install - screenshot tour
  • QED: A New, High Performance QEMU Disk Format
  • Pardus 2011.1 Final: Now Scheduled for July 10
  • Watch for shares of Red Hat to approach resistance at 46.77
  • What to do with your USB flash drive: Run Linux
  • Mono Project: Next Steps
  • GNOME 3 Mailnag 0.1 Released
  • Unity Progress Report – Irish Edition
  • Could you do Linus "Linux" Torvalds job?
  • Delicious Inkscape mockup export script
  • Freshly squeezed: the Juice open source 'Media Aggregator'
  • FLOSS Weekly 173: Lesson Learned From FLOSSing Weekly

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • Webian Shell: Prototype Web-Based Shell
  • Unity 2d on openSUSE almost there: screenshot
  • Lightspark Flash Player Sees Some Improvements
  • FabFi: An open source wireless network built with trash
  • Thinkpad is not as durable as before
  • DRM Changes Coming Up For Linux 3.1 Kernel
  • Potential Red Hat (RHT) Trade Targets 26.55% Return
  • Microsoft patent division taking cash from at least 5 Android vendors
  • Bacon: Free Official Ubuntu Book For Approved LoCo Teams
  • Linux gaming handheld targets $10-$20 price -- but is it for real?
  • Interview with Libre Graphics Magazine at Libre Graphics Meeting 2011

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • First Public Alpha Released for Linux Game 'The Platform Shooter'
  • Getting secure with Mantra: An open source penetration testing kit
  • Shed Skin: Another Way To Compile Python Code
  • Intel Releases New Open Source Packages
  • Blender 2.58a released
  • A quick look at Indie Games on Linux
  • AriOS 3.0 Released
  • Burn CD, DVD and Blu-Ray in Ubuntu Linux using Silicon Empire
  • New OpenOffice.Org One Month On
  • Game Drift Linux – Distribution For Gamers
  • ClassicMenu Indicator
  • A Super key you will want to press
  • Modal Dialogs Land in Ubuntu 11.10
  • New Linux-64-bit-Option in LibO-ExtensionCenter

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • Automounting NTFS flash drives in Gentoo
  • Dr. Bill Netcast – 195 – (07/02/11)
  • Fedora and laptops - only a brief look ...
  • WebOS 3.0 In-Depth | LAS | s17e06
  • Linux Outlaws 216 - Jaffa Cakes
  • Automake and cmake revisited
  • Installed Fedora 15
  • LXDM: the wannabe Login Manager
  • Going Linux Jul 05: #143 Listener Feedback
  • The Kernel Graphics Interface (KGI) Is Effectively Dead
  • HOWTO : Yet Another Back|Track 5 on Dell Streak 5
  • Bash builtins
  • Game Drift Linux – Distribution For Gamers
  • Hidden Linux : Hardware reports
  • Stability Adventures Part 1 – Adding unit tests to compiz

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
  • Executive offers peek under the Red Hat
  • Cross-Distro Mini-Conf for 2012
  • Reading news the way I like it
  • Ubuntu: how to deal with (or not) Unity
  • Interview with Keith Poole from Desura part 2!
  • Bodhi Linux for ARM Alpha 1
  • Inner City Boston Ubuntu Hour 2
  • PCLinuxOS 2011 Review (video)
  • Put your site under Siege
  • Quiz: Input/Output Redirection
  • Install Arch Linux On Your Computer [Part 2]

some howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
  • 7 Useful Commands For Ubuntu Linux Newbies
  • Install Ubuntu without burning LiveCD from Windows 7 dual-boot (not wubi)
  • Two monitors. Different resolutions. One desktop.
  • Unknown Horizons 2011.2 – available for openSUSE and Fedora
  • Linux IT to underwrite open-source adoption
  • Light Desktop Environment for Fedora 15
  • Valve Makes The Source SDK Free Of Charge
  • No need to worry as open source contributions decline
  • Install Python 2.5 on CentOS/4
  • Linux Shell Introduction
  • First teaser trailer for Dirk Dashing 2: E.V.I.L. Eye!
  • Unified Messaging Menu / MeMenu Mockup
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 26th June
  • PCLinuxOS 2011.6 Review / Thoughts (video)
  • Newlooks – a classic touch for GNOME 3

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • Gameolith The Linux® Game Download Store
  • BlueBubble: What I learned
  • Compile and Run Syncany on Ubuntu 11.04
  • Rollback, a barrel of fun
  • Larry the Cow Embraces Freedom
  • Running GNOME apps in Kubuntu
  • Battery Drain Problem? : Bumblebee to the rescue
  • How to start contributing to Debian?
  • What To Do If Still Seeing Poor Linux Battery Life
  • Untangle your network
  • Red Hat Exec's $1 Million Sale
  • Mono Consultants
  • New Plasma Active Window Switcher
  • A Python Front-End To GCC Is Brewing This Summer
  • A quick note about Mandriva 2011 UI

today's leftovers:

Filed under
  • Top 10 supercomputers in numbers
  • Ubuntu Community Week Collector Card #1
  • FLOSS Weekly 172: MediaFront
  • Bridge Construction Set lands on the Software Center
  • Firefox tries, and fails, to make business amends
  • Mike Kestner Leaves Xamarin
  • Linux Outlaws 215 - Bitcoin Discussion
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