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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME 3
  • GNU Xnee 3.10 (‘Heron’) released
  • The “App Model” and the Web
  • Dragonplayer - Simple video player
  • BEEP-Game Review and Gameolith
  • plasma active & contour demo
  • A selection of photographs from some of RMS's past events
  • Linux 3.x Matures as GNOME Fork Calls 'Grow'
  • Wallpapers from... heaven?
  • Wednesday in Fedora
  • It works: Plasma now looks up missing components through PackageKit
  • BSDanywhere: time machine
  • FLOSS Weekly 177: Delta3D

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Color It By Numbers – Flowers, Released
  • Everything is a Compiler
  • 42 percent of PCs will be running Windows 7 by year-end
  • LF Announces Linux Training Scholarship Recipients
  • Broadcom, Dell, Linux 3.0
  • Computer: How far is it to the next good interface?
  • Using a single database for KDE programs
  • .exe file on Linux
  • But wait, there’s more
  • Toasters and Pants at Day Three of Desktop Summit 2011
  • Red Hat's Most Serious Flaw Types for 2010
  • desktop summit thoughts
  • Let’s do the Time Warp… Again! [Achron]
  • OpenSuse 11.4 Woes
  • On WebKit and WebKit2

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Five awesome new themes for your gnome shell
  • Samsung Remove Ubuntu Logo From Galaxy Ad
  • TRAUMA Has Been Released
  • MariaDB Crash Course released
  • KDE World Domination
  • OSCON Round-up
  • Answering critics on Linux configuration anarchy
  • Anybody got sgv, StarDraw 2.0 examples with text?
  • How to piss off a Linux kernel subsystem maintainer - part 6
  • Thoughts on FOSS Advocates
  • Get the branding: Unofficial KDE abbreviations list
  • Firefox Extension for Anonymous Browsing Hits Version 1.0
  • Day Two at Desktop Summit 2011
  • Favorite Terminal Emulators
  • Scoregasm comes to linux
  • Monday in Fedora
  • Feature preview of Fedora 16 installer
  • Some Desktop Summit videos
  • What Would Linus Do About GNOME 3? (blog safari)
  • Linux Outlaws 222 - Don't Be Harshin' Our Mellow

today's leftovers:

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News
HowTos
  • 3D Puzzle Game 'Cubosphere' Beta Released for Linux
  • install rpm packages on other pc w/o net connection
  • Minitube 1.5 to the rescue
  • Linux Action Show s18e01: Great Linux Games
  • Mixing Debian testing and unstable packages
  • A Surprisingly Easy Tip for Upgrading Ubuntu
  • 3 Linux Apps for Converting Videos
  • Japanese in PCLinuxOS? Of course!
  • Ubuntu Membership & Tips for Applicants
  • Linux Mint: An updating tip
  • add contrib and non-free repository in Debian GNU/Linux
  • [How To] Make A Minimal-looking Narwhal Desktop

today's leftovers:

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News
  • The 5 Worst Videos on YouTube
  • Mandriva 2011 with kernel 3.0
  • RAW image processing with digikam
  • Contributions of Non-Technical People
  • Raspberry Pi Interview With Eben Upton
  • Record of KDE Donations complete
  • Bash, special parameters by examples
  • Ubuntu Photography Guidelines

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Disney to Produce Penguin Film… Called ‘Tux’
  • Recycle's Friend, Reuse
  • Sourceforge Code of Conduct and Community Contributed Docs
  • Gtk module in Vala for the onscreen positioning code
  • A Guide to Open Source Licensing
  • openSUSE Factory Progress 2011-08-05
  • Open Source Meets Systems Management
  • Rugged Individualism, Community, and Templating Systems
  • Does open source need corporate backing to succeed?
  • Going Linux Aug 05: #146 Listener Feedback
  • EU-law on re-use of public sector data may include source code
  • Atom Zombie Smasher has added to The Humble Indie Bundle #3
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.08.05
  • Open Embedded: An alternative way to build embedded Linux distributions
  • BR: Government signs up to develop OpenOffice and LibreOffice
  • Is Google too big to get anything done?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Why I returned my iPad
  • Making mountains out of molehills (DMB)
  • My View of Fedora 15
  • How is booting into runlevel 1 different from single user boots?
  • Approaching the desktop summit
  • Extending our Reach: Many Layers of User Sovereignty
  • And we are back: Mono 2.10.3
  • Red Hat Certifies 400 Virtualization Professionals
  • X.Org Server 1.11 RC2 Is Released
  • In Search Of... A Few Good Developers
  • RapidDisk, A New Linux RAM Disk Kernel Module
  • Android Is the Least Open of the Open Source Platforms
  • An Open Source Gorilla In The Mists
  • $199 Asus X101 targets Linux tablet alternative
  • Linux Outlaws 221 - My Internal DNS
  • Linux Crazy Podcast 90 Interview with Jane Trembath
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 414
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 3 Episode 15

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KVM Virtualization: Ready for the Desktop?
  • Windows is Dying… and so are Macintosh and Linux
  • openSUSE ambassadors keep rocking…
  • Linux Australia sorts out finances, keeps membership free
  • IE User Stupidy Study a Hoax
  • Red Hat completes 10 years of Linux Kernel Leadership
  • 5 great uses for your old Windows computer
  • Unity Facebook App Adds Muti-photo Uploads and Easier Installation
  • Free Software for Little People: Interview
  • Ubuntu IVI Remix receives GENIVI Alliance Complaince Approval
  • New game titles in the Ubuntu Software Center
  • BSD Magazine August Issue Ready
  • FLOSS Weekly 176: Colin Percival
  • Linux Basement - Episode 70 - Google+ or Minus

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux users pay 3x that of Windows users for Humble Indie Bundle 3
  • OpenClonk and Humble Indie Bundle updates
  • Eugeni Dodonov Takes Job at Intel
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 226
  • Improvements in KOrganizer 4.7
  • iTALC - Sourceforge POTM for August
  • OpenBox 3.5.0 Window Manager Released
  • Aseigo: wetabirific
  • In Defense of Internet Anonymity -- Again
  • Three Real-Time Animation Methods
  • State of Drupal 2011 survey
  • Doomsday Testin
  • KDE 4.7 – You didn’t think you would get off that easily, would you?
  • Link-Dead, New 2D Multiplayer Action Game Coming to Linux
  • Canonical Sees Seven Opportunities for Ubuntu Partners

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Netbook Review: ZaReason Teo Pro Netbook
  • Interview with a 0 A.D. Developer
  • Interview with Em
  • GNOME Visual Identity manual
  • Dual-boot woes
  • Pics from OSCon
  • Are you ready for RWX³ ?
  • New features for the Mollom module for Drupal
  • Samsung Has Agreed To Stop Sales Of Galaxy Tab 10.1 In Australia
  • Tablet for toddlers runs Android 2.3
  • Phonon VLC 0.4.1 – The Rise of Legacy Media
  • Linux gets a bit of good news on the Netflix front
  • Google Music Manager now Plays to Ubuntu’s tunes
  • Netatalk returns to open source
  • Photo Opportunity -- Linus and Other Hackers Don Penguin Suits 20th Anniversary
  • Debconf
  • Minetest
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