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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Reorder network devices set by udev
  • Fourth alpha release of Debian Edu/Skolelinux Wheezy released
  • Left 4 Dead 2 mutates past Linux beta
  • DoudouLinux 2.0 is out
  • Steam for Linux Gets a Shiny New Beta Update
  • DOS on Linux
  • Peppermint in Asheville's Mountain Xpress
  • Explaining Intel Rapid Start Technology
  • Linux: SSH Tunneling, Port Redirection and Security
  • Newbies Guide to Debian 7 – Part Two
  • FreeBSD begins process to support secure boot
  • How To Clear Memory Cache On Linux
  • Static Blogging With Pelican
  • Computer mouse inventor Doug Engelbart dies at 88
  • Linux Gamers Brace Yourselves, the Steam Summer Sale Starts Today
  • Open Source Never Dies

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The Last Big Lie
  • KDE 4.10.5 for Slackware 14.0
  • Inky to Update Users on Progress of Linux App
  • introducing sources.debian.net
  • Interview Concurrent's Chris Wensel
  • Firefox OS mobilises HTML5, without the added Steve Jobs
  • Mozilla Prepares to Launch First Firefox OS Smartphones
  • WattOS R7 x64 Linux Distro Review (video)
  • Blender 2.68 rc released
  • Interstellar Marines released in Early Access on Steam

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Everything in Mozilla’s new office is open source
  • Red Hat May Be a Buy After Turning the Corner
  • Intel brings Linux support to System Studio Extended

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora release days aren’t as frantic as they used to be, and why it’s mostly a good thing
  • Nouveau Changes Pulled For Linux 3.11 Kernel
  • an OpenSUSE 12.3 Minimal Server
  • Linux Tail Command Options With Examples
  • R.I.P. Altavista
  • 20 Advanced Commands for Linux Experts
  • On my movement to GRUB2
  • New To Linux Programming? Say Hello To Memory Corruption
  • Using hash tags to organize bash history
  • LibreOffice At FISL 14
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
  • 3.10 Linux Kernel Development Rate
  • XenServer Goes Open Source
  • Newbies Guide to Debian 7 – Part One
  • 22 Linux Foundation newbies slideshow
  • Interviewed: madddog answers your questions
  • Working on Pisi: Display and GRUB 2
  • Game Preview: Mad Max
  • Name your price for Shank and Shank 2
  • Go with the Best of Breed: Fedora 19
  • Linux Outlaws 316 – Sentient Sideburns

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The Linux Setup - Igor Ljubuncic, Dedoimedo.com
  • HowTo: Use ip instead of ifconfig
  • Mozilla is a community of do-ers
  • Over 100 teams registered for Software Freedom Day
  • Ubuntu Alarm Clock
  • Manage a security bug
  • Keep Journal with jrnl
  • renameutils: Underappreciated tools
  • TechBytes Episode 79: Richard Stallman Speaks
  • Some examples of how to use the paste command
  • July 2013 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released
  • What’s New In Gimp 2.8.6
  • Switching shells
  • gearhead: Saving the best for last

few leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 18 to 19 yum upgrade
  • Full Circle #74 hits the streets!
  • GhostBSD 3.1 Ditches the Nvidia Drivers
  • How to build Ubuntu packages from source the easy way
  • Use an Android Device as Screen and Input for Raspberry Pi
  • So I have a new desktop computer. I installed Wheezy
  • Make a personal wiki with DokuWiki
  • Gnome Weather 3.9.3
  • Install ‘Glances’ (system monitor) on Ubuntu 13.04

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Set Up a Secure Proxy Server in Ubuntu
  • Universal "share" button for Firefox
  • Firefox 23 Beta arrives
  • JW-11 is a cheap, Linux-friendly ARM PC with a 2.5″ drive bay
  • Five simple ways to avoid Android malware

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Xfce Composite Editor
  • Valve updates Source SDK with Linux Support
  • Nouveau Gets H.264/MPEG2 Decoding From VP2
  • SUSE Hack Week 9
  • More Good LibO Contest News
  • Dedoimedo celebrates its seventh birthday
  • Monitor Raspberry Pi with RPi-Monitor
  • Hardening Gentoo is our business… new monthly report
  • More Great Linux Awk, Sed, and Bash Tips and Tricks
  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive to Arrive Soon on Linux
  • How to reverse a string
  • Tales of tor 3
  • more vim expressions
  • Genius Math Tool gets updated
  • Linux Shell: DF and DU report different values
  • Natural Selection 2 is looking to come to Linux
  • What can you do with a headless server in 35 minutes?
  • A guide to the Unity Launcher in Ubuntu 13.04
  • Easily Create A Linux Live USB in Mac OS X
  • Change repeat rate in awesome WM
  • freesweep: I shall never understand

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • My open source 3D game engine
  • Firefox aims to develop 'self-healing' browsers
  • Avira says farewell to Linux
  • Open source projects aren't tax scams
  • Get into Linux in under an hour on a Raspberry Pi

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Two years later: Vim, Tmux and my Linux desktop
  • First contact with oss
  • Firefox gets a new logo
  • tails of tor, part 2
  • Improve security with MySQL stored procedures
  • Language Drills with Raspberry Pi
  • Cleaning up MySQL binary logs
  • Valve Opens Portal for Linux Gamers
  • Don't Like KDE's Cashew? Move it out of sight
  • systemd units vs openbsd rc.d
  • Half-Life 2 Is Now Stable On Linux
  • TLLTS Episode 511 June 26
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.