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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Radeon RX 580 Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Benchmarks

    For those curious if the Radeon RX 580 "Polaris Evolved" graphics card is worthwhile as a Linux gamer, here are the initial Phoronix figures for the RX 580 8GB graphics card that launched yesterday. These initial tests were done with AMDGPU+RadeonSI/RADV under a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan workloads.

  • RADV Shader Prefetching Yields Minor Performance Boost

    Bas Nieuwenhuizen continues being very busy with work on the open-source (unofficial) Radeon Vulkan driver, RADV.

    The latest patch sent out by Nieuwenhuizen today is an 18 line patch for allowing shader pre-fetch support in the RADV driver.

  • Vulkan Crosses 1,000 Projects On GitHub

    For those tracking the growth of the Vulkan graphics API via GitHub, a gratifying milestone was reached today of having 1,000 projects now mentioning Vulkan.

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA 381 Linux Beta vs. Linux 4.11 / Mesa 17.1 Radeon Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how the bleeding-edge open-source Radeon driver stack is comparing to the latest NVIDIA closed-source binary blob, here are some fresh benchmarks on many different cards. Tested is the new NVIDIA 381.09 binary driver with different Maxwell/Pascal GPUs alongside various AMD GCN card tests using the Linux 4.11 Git kernel and Mesa 17.1-dev Git.

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LLVM Clang 3.9.1, Clang 4.0 & GCC 6.3 With Intel's Clear Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

A few days back Intel's Clear Linux updated their LLVM Clang compiler from 3.9.1 to the recent 4.0.0 release, following Beignet getting LLVM 4.0 support. Here are some before/after benchmarks as well as fresh GCC benchmarks.

Clear Linux ships both LLVM Clang and GCC and switches between the default compiler when building its packages/bundles depending upon which compiler is known to do the best for the particular workload. As far as the default compiler exposed, GCC is the default. I ran some tests of Clear Linux 14620 that shipped with GCC 6.3 and and LLVM Clang 3.9.1 followed by upgrading to Clear Linux 14640 to get the distribution's LLVM Clang 4.0 build. (Note there was also a small update to its Linux 4.10 kernel with that build too.)

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9-Way RadeonSI GPU Tests On Mesa 17.1 + Linux 4.11

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With the Mesa 17.1 branching now having happened plus in prepping for Radeon RX 500 series Linux graphics benchmarks this week, for your viewing pleasure now are tests on nine different AMD GCN GPUs under a range of Linux gaming tests when using the 4.11 kernel and Mesa 17.1 Git trees. NVIDIA comparison results will follow plus planned RX 560/580 Linux benchmarks.

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Graphics in Linux: Mesa 17.0.4 and More

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 On Ubuntu 17.04

    In early April AMD released the AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 driver as their first hybrid proprietary driver update in some time. With this update came support for Ubuntu 16.04.2 (and also 16.10, unofficially) but to little surprise it doesn't work out-of-the-box with this week's Ubuntu 17.04 release. But it can be made to work.

  • RadeonSI Polaris: Mesa 12.0 vs. 13.0 vs. 17.0 vs. 17.1 Git

    With Mesa 17.1 branching this weekend I figured it would be a fun Easter running benchmarks of Mesa Git compared to previous branches with a Radeon RX 470 Polaris graphics card. Here are these Mesa 17.1 benchmarks while other tests and on more GPUs is forthcoming.

  • Nouveau In Linux 4.13 Will Support HDMI Stereo 3D
  • Vulkan 1.0.48 Released

    There's another weekly update available to the Vulkan API, but this Easter update is on the small side.

Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Looking Ahead To The Polaris RX 550/560/570/580 On Linux
  • Today Is The Last Day Of Feature Development For Mesa 17.1

    In order to get Mesa 17.1 out on time, branching is happening today for this next quarterly update to Mesa.

    Mesa 17.1 is another significant update with it bringing a number of Vulkan updates to ANV and RADV, more OpenGL extensions, the GLSL/TGSI on-disk shader cache, the RadeonSI shader cache, performance improvements, and various other work. I'll provide a feature overview this weekend of the new material for Mesa 17.1.

  • AMD's Kernel Graphics Code Is Approaching One Million Lines

    With the DRM driver features settled for Linux 4.12, I was curious about the size of these Direct Rendering Manager drivers.

  • X.Org 2017 Election Results

    Quick summary: They managed to squeeze out enough voter participation and yes-votes to approve the changes to the membership agreement. The voting for the four new board seats were carried out of the five participants, but due to the by-laws mandating that not more than two board members be from the same organization/company, that clause was hit. As usual, Intel has heavy participation by X.Org developers. The newly-elected members include Daniel Vetter, Martin Peres, Rob Clark, and Taylor Campbell. Others sitting on the board who have terms expiring next year are ALex Deucher, Egbert Eich, Keith Packard, and Bryce Harrington.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • GNU Guile 2.2.1 released
    We are happy to announce GNU Guile release 2.2.1, the first bug-fix release in the new 2.2 stable release series.
  • Announcing Nylas Mail 2.0 [Ed: just Electron]
  • Cerebro Is An Amazing Open Source OS X Spotlight Alternative For Linux [Ed: also just Electron]
    You may be fed up with traditional way of searching/opening applications on your system. Cerebro is an amazing utility built using Electron and available for Linux, Windows, and Mac. It is open-source and released under MIT license.
  • Flowblade Another Video Editor for Linux? Give It A Try!
    You may have favorite video editor to edit your videos but there is no harm to try something new, its initial release was not that long, with time it made some great improvements. It can be bit hard to master this video editor but if you are not new in this field you can make it easily and will be total worth of time.
  • Get System Info from CLI Using `NeoFetch` Tool in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • Ukuu Kernel Manager Utility lets You Upgrade or Install Kernels in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are many ways to upgrade your Linux Kernel using Synaptics, command line and so. The Ukuu utility is the simply solution to manager your Ubuntu/Linux Mint kernels. If you want to test new fixes in the Linux Kernel then you can install Mainline Kernels released by Ubuntu team but mainline Kernels are intended to use for testing purposes only (so be careful).
  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Use Vi/Vim Text Editor in Linux
    While working with Linux systems, there are several areas where you’ll need to use a text editor including programming/scripting, editing configuration/text files, to mention but a few. There are several remarkable text editors you’ll find out there for Linux-based operating systems.
  • OpenShot 2.3 Linux Video Editor New Features
    It’s been quite some time since we last talked about OpenShot, and more specifically when it had its second major release. Recently, the team behind the popular open source video editor has made its third point release available which happens to come with a couple of exciting new features and tools, so here is a quick guide on where to find them and how to use them.
  • Boostnote: Another Great Note Taking App for Developers? Find Out By Yourself
    Boostnote is an open-source note-taking application especially made for programmers and developers, it is build up with Electron framework and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. Being programmers, we take lots of notes which includes commands, code snippets, bug information and so on. It all comes in handy when you have organized them all in one place, Boostnote does this job very well. It lets you organize your notes in folders with tags, so you can find anything you are looking for very quickly.
  • Collabora Office 5.3 Released
    Today we released Collabora Office 5.3 and Collabora GovOffice 5.3, which contain great new features and enhancements. They also contains all fixes from the upstream libreoffice-5-3 branch and several backported features.

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