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Graphics/Benchmarks

100+ Benchmarks Between Clear Linux vs. Arch-Based Manjaro Linux - Summer 2019 Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux is comparing to the Arch-based Manjaro Linux distribution, here are a number of benchmarks on the same Intel Core i7 8700K in seeing how these rolling-release distros are competing for summer 2019.

More than 100 benchmarks were run on Clear Linux and Manjaro Linux using their latest releases for providing the very latest packages.

The same Intel Core i7 8700K system with 16GB of RAM and NVMe solid-state storage was used as a good example distribution for comparing these distros. Some Debian Buster tests on the i7-8700K are also coming in shortly for adding to the comparison.

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Kernel: Systemd, DXVK, Intel and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd Is Now Seeing Continuous Fuzzing By Fuzzit

    In hoping to catch more bugs quickly, systemd now has continuous fuzzing integration via the new "Fuzzit" platform that provides continuous fuzzing as a service. 

    New this week to systemd is the continuous fuzzing integration where every pull request / push will see some quick checks carried out while on a daily basis will be fuzzed in full for all targets.

  •  

  • DXVK 1.2.2 Brings Minor CPU Overhead Optimizations, Game Fixes

    In time for those planning to spend some time this weekend gaming, DXVK lead developer Philip Rebohle announced the release of DXVK 1.2.2 that will hopefully soon be integrated as part of a Proton update for Steam Play but right now can be built from source.

    While certain upstream Wine developers express DXVK being a "dead end" and are optimistic in favor of piping their WineD3D implementation over Vulkan, for Linux gamers today wanting to enjoy D3D11 Windows games on Linux the DXVK library continues working out splendid with great performance and running many Direct3D games with much better performance over the current WineD3D OpenGL code.

  • Intel 19.23.13131 OpenCL NEO Stack Adds Comet Lake Support

    We've seen the Intel Comet Lake support get pieced together in recent months in the different components making up the Intel Linux graphics stack while the compute-runtime is the latest addition. Comet Lake as a refresher is a planned successor to Coffeelake/Whiskeylake and expected to come out this year as yet more 9th Gen hardware. But Comet Lake should be interesting with rumored 10-core designs. Though with being more processors with Gen9 graphics, the Comet Lake Linux support basically boils down to adding in the new PCI IDs.

  • AMD Wires Its New Runtime Linker Into RadeonSI Gallium3D

    RadeonSI Gallium3D has already shifted over to using this new linker. Making use of the .rodata should help with efficiencies throughout the driver (more details in this forum thread) but at this point is mostly laying the groundwork for more improvements to be made moving forward.

Initial Benchmarks Of Microsoft's WSL2 - Windows Subsystem For Linux 2 On Windows 10 Is A Mixed Bag

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the release of WSL2 as a Windows 10 Insider Preview update this week, we've been putting the new Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 under some benchmarks compared to WSL1 and bare metal Linux. While WSL2 has improved the I/O performance thanks to the new Hyper-V-based virtualization approach employed by WSL2, the performance has regressed in other areas for running Linux binaries on Windows 10. Here are our preliminary benchmark results.

In this comparison is a look at the Windows 10 WSL1 performance against that of the new WSL2 when using the same Windows 10 Insiders build as of this week that introduced the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS WSL instance was used for testing with its default packages. In addition to looking at the WSL1 vs. WSL2 performance of Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS itself was also tested bare metal on the same system for looking at the raw performance of Ubuntu on the Intel desktop being tested. Additionally, Clear Linux 29920 was also tested for what has largely become a "gold standard" for Linux performance in showing what Intel systems are capable of achieving performance-wise under Linux, so that is being used in this comparison as a reference point.

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Graphics: AMDGPU, Vulkan, Direct Rendering Manager

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • New GFX1011 / GFX1012 Targets Appear In AMDGPU LLVM Compiler Backend

    To date the open-source AMD "Navi" graphics code inside their LLVM compiler back-end has been focused on the "GFX1010" target but now it's been branched out to also GFX1011 and GFX1012.

    We now know the initial Navi/GFX10 products to be the Radeon RX 5700 and Radeon RX 5700XT. We are still waiting to see the full open-source Linux driver code in full while over the past two days we've seen more AMDGPU LLVM GFX10 code continue to drop.

  • MoltenVK 1.0.35 Brings Many Additions & Improvements For Vulkan On macOS
  • It's The Season For Cleaning & Restructuring Within The Intel Linux Kernel Graphics Code

    With Intel's Icelake/Gen11 graphics support considered production-ready when on the latest Linux graphics driver components and ahead of the real enablement around their highly anticipated Xe Graphics discrete hardware, it's making for a summer of clean-ups and restructuring within their kernel Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver.

    There's still bug fixing and other minor work going into the Intel Gen11 Linux graphics driver code (along with new PCI IDs and the like), but now with the driver developers in the period between introducing major generational work and in particular Intel's dGPU plans that will require a lot of new driver code, there's been a lot of low-level code clean-ups and restructuring going on within the i915 DRM driver.

Kernel: NNPI Support, Mesa 19.2 Commences, SDL2 Adds Wayland HiDPI Support

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Linux Kernel Starts Prepping For Intel Ice Lake NNPI Support

    Back during CES, Intel announced the Nervana Neural Network Processor for Inference (NNPI) to be powered by 10nm Ice Lake cores. Now ahead of the Linux 5.3 kernel cycle we're seeing the very first signs of the Ice Lake NNPI upbringing for the kernel. 

  • Mesa 19.2 Picks Up The Radeon R300~R500 Series On-Disk OpenGL Shader Cache

    Last week an on-disk GLSL shader cache was proposed for the vintage "R300g" open-source Gallium3D driver for this OpenGL code supporting through the Radeon X1000 (R500) series. That shader cache support has now been merged into Mesa 19.2.

  • SDL2 Adds Wayland HiDPI Support

    The ever important Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL) can now handle HiDPI window scaling under Wayland.

    Thanks to developer Sebastian Krzyszkowiak, HiDPI support is now in place for SDL2 on Wayland. This code supports drawing the window based upon a scaling factor.

Mesa 19.1

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 19.1.0
    Mesa 19.1.0 is now available.
    
    This release consists of approximately 3700 commits from 158
    developers.
    
    Huge thanks to all the developers, testers and users for their
    ongoing work and support shaping up the 19.1.0 release.
    
    The top highlights include:
    
     - GL_ARB_parallel_shader_compile for all drivers.
    -  GL_EXT_gpu_shader4 on all GL 3.1 drivers.
    -  GL_EXT_shader_image_load_formatted on radeonsi.
    -  GL_EXT_texture_buffer_object on all GL 3.1 drivers.
    -  GL_EXT_texture_compression_s3tc_srgb on Gallium and i965 drivers (ES extension).
    -  GL_NV_compute_shader_derivatives on Iris and i965 drivers.
    -  GL_KHR_parallel_shader_compile on all drivers.
    -  GL_INTEL_conservative_rasterization on Iris.
    
    
    Additional features:
    
    ANV
     - VK_EXT_buffer_device_address
     - VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable
     - VK_KHR_ycbcr_image_arrays
     - VK_EXT_inline_uniform_block
     - VK_EXT_external_memory_host
     - VK_EXT_host_query_reset
     - VK_KHR_surface_protected_capabilities
     - VK_EXT_pipeline_creation_feedback
     - VK_NV_compute_shader_derivatives
     - VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8
     - VK_KHR_shader_atomic_int64
     - VK_EXT_descriptor_indexing
     - VK_EXT_memory_budget
     
    RADV 
     - VK_EXT_buffer_device_address
     - VK_EXT_depth_clip_enable
     - VK_EXT_inline_uniform_block
     - VK_EXT_host_query_reset
     - VK_KHR_surface_protected_capabilities
     - VK_EXT_pipeline_creation_feedback
     - VK_KHR_8bit_storage
     - VK_AMD_gpu_shader_int16
     - VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float
     - VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8
    
    
    For the full log see:
           git log 19.0-branchpoint..mesa-19.1.0
    
    
    Changes since rc5:
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (1):
          radv: Prevent out of bound shift on 32-bit builds.
    
    Charmaine Lee (1):
          svga: Remove unnecessary check for the pre flush bit for setting vertex buffers
    
    Deepak Rawat (2):
          winsys/drm: Fix out of scope variable usage
          winsys/svga/drm: Fix 32-bit RPCI send message
    
    Emil Velikov (3):
          egl/dri: flesh out and use dri2_create_drawable()
          mapi: add static_date offset to MaxShaderCompilerThreadsKHR
          mapi: correctly handle the full offset table
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          util/os_file: actually return the error read() gave us
    
    Jason Ekstrand (1):
          nir/propagate_invariant: Don't add NULL vars to the hash table
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (2):
          Update version to 19.1.0
          docs: Add release notes for 19.1.0
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          egl/x11: calloc dri2_surf so it's properly zeroed
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (2):
          intel/perf: fix EuThreadsCount value in performance equations
          intel/perf: improve dynamic loading config detection
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv/cmd_buffer: Initalize the clear color struct for CNL+
    
    Nataraj Deshpande (1):
          anv: Fix check for isl_fmt in assert
    
    Rob Clark (2):
          freedreno/a6xx: fix issues with gallium HUD
          freedreno/a6xx: fix hangs with newer sqe fw
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: fix alpha-to-coverage when there is unused color attachments
          radv: fix setting CB_SHADER_MASK for dual source blending
  • Mesa 19.1.0 Release Notes / June 11, 2019

    Mesa 19.1.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.1.1.

    Mesa 19.1.0 implements the OpenGL 4.5 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.5. OpenGL 4.5 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver.

  • Mesa 19.1 Released With Experimental Intel Gallium3D, Other New GL/VLK Drivers Too

    After being delayed by a few weeks due to a few blocker bugs, Mesa 19.1 as the quarterly feature update to this open-source multi-vendor graphics driver stack has been released! Mesa 19.1 is a huge update with several new drivers, performance optimizations, more mature support for existing Vulkan drivers, and other changes.

  • Mesa 19.1 is officially out plus NVIDIA 430.26 is available now

    Two sets of driver releases for you recently, with Mesa 19.1 now officially out as quite a big upgrade and a minor NVIDIA driver change.

    First up, NVIDIA 430.26 is out as an update to their stable long-lived driver series. It adds support for various Quadro GPUs, as well as fixing a bug in 415.13, that caused audio over DisplayPort to not work in some configurations.

    The bigger one is for AMD/Intel with Mesa 19.1 being officially released today. As usual, the Mesa team note that since it's brand new you might want to wait for Mesa 19.1.1 to have a fully stable experience.

Kernel: Bcachefs, ROCm and New NVIDIA Linux Driver (Blob)

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Bcachefs Completes Core Feature Work, Could Merge Soon If Review Goes Well

    Kent Overstreet who has been developing the Bcachefs out of the BCache code has announced core feature work has wrapped up, he's very happy with how the work has panned out, and potentially could be merging the code into the Linux kernel soon if the review is pleasant.

    Overstreet shared in a status update yesterday that he's run out of things to polish and "excuses to keep tinkering" with core feature work being done and known bugs getting much less. There still are some additions to make and optimizations to be had, but he's feeling like the code is in a state where it could be mainlined.

  • Radeon ROCm 2.6 To Support Intel Vega M Chips

    The Radeon Open Compute (ROCm) stack will begin to support the Intel Kabylake-G chips with the "Vega M" graphics.

    A simple kernel patch adding the VEGA M ID to the device probe function was the last bit needed to allow ROCm to work on Vega M for this open-source compute stack with OpenCL.

  • NVIDIA Releases 430.26 Linux Driver With New Quadro Support

    NVIDIA just released a new stable Linux driver in the 430 long-lived series.

    The NVIDIA 430.26 is out to but being another stable point release isn't the most exciting update. There is just one fix mentioned and then just formally supporting a handful of new graphics cards.

    The fix in this driver build is audio DisplayPort being broken for some configurations since the NVIDIA 415 series.

The Current Radeon RX Vega 64 / Radeon VII Linux OpenCL Performance Against NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I provided a fresh look at the Radeon VII Linux gaming performance (as well as comparing AMDVLK vs. RADV) now that I have a Vega 20 graphics card running great under Linux after the pre-production VII had failed. One of the other areas I was curious to see how the Linux performance evolved in the few months since the original Radeon VII Linux benchmarks was checking on the ROCm OpenCL performance. Here are those results up against NVIDIA with their proprietary Linux graphics driver.

This article is to serve as some fresh Radeon VII OpenCL benchmark figures on Linux while also tossing in the Radeon RX Vega 64 and Radeon RX 580 as some reference figures. These tests were done on ROCm 2.4 while just before the weekend ROCm 2.5 shipped. Unfortunately due to an E3 event I didn't have the time to test ROCm 2.5 yet, but no OpenCL performance changes are noted. Anyhow, as soon as I'm back will be some ROCm 2.5 tests. The NVIDIA tests meanwhile were using the current 430 series driver while testing the GeForce GTX 1060, GTX 1080, GTX 1650, GTX 1660 Ti, RTX 2060, RTX 2070, RTX 2080, RTX 2080 Ti, and TITAN RTX for a wide-range of NVIDIA OpenCL Linux performance metrics.

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AMD Zen 2 + Radeon RX 5700 Series For Linux Expectations

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Graphics/Benchmarks

This weekend I was out the AMD E3 event learning more about their third-generation Ryzen processors as well as their equally exciting AMD Radeon RX 5700 series Navi hardware. Being at the event, one could reasonably deduce the Linux support will be great and it does appear to be that way building upon their improvements of earlier GPUs and Zen processors. It does appear to be that way while obviously we will begin testing soon of these new processors and graphics cards. At least for the Zen 2 processors, I am confident in their Linux support while on the Navi side we are awaiting Linux driver support but I am optimistic it will work out nicely. Now that the initial embargo has expired, here are more details on these new AMD products launching 7 July and my Linux information at this time.

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Linux Kernel: Zstd, Linux and UNIX Comparison (Ignoring GNU), AMDVLK, Vulkan and Gallium3D

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Zstd-Compressing The Linux Kernel Has Been Brought Up Again

    Using the Zstd compression algorithm to compress the Linux kernel image has been brought up again with new patches expected in the coming weeks. 

    It's been brought up multiple times before to allow Zstd compression for the Linux kernel image. But to date the patches have been rejected from mainline on the basis of almost yearly there being some hot new trend in compression algorithms and the desire to add them immediately to the mainline kernel. It's been brought up that if Zstd were to be added or some other compression algorithm, an existing alternative should at least be deprecated or removed.

  • Unix Vs Linux: How These Two Operating Systems Are Different

    We all know that Linux is “free and open source”. Meaning, one can download it from the internet without any hassle and also, redistribute it under GNU licenses. One can make any changes to the source and modify as per user convenience.

    Talking about Unix, it has several derivatives, and not every derivative is free and open source. For example, MacOS is one of the derivatives and it is neither free nor open sourced. However, it is fast changing, and many Unix derivatives are emerging as open source.

    Fact: When Unix was first introduced, it was not open source —the Unix source code was licensable via agreements with AT&T. Also, the first Unix license was sold to the University of Illinois in 1975.

  • AMDVLK 2019.Q2.5 Brings Fixes For World War Z, F1 2018, Other Optimizations

    The AMDVLK 2019.Q2.5 driver was released this morning as the newest open-source Radeon Vulkan driver for Linux systems wishing to use this official driver as an alternative to the Mesa RADV driver. 

    AMDVLK 2019.Q2.5 is the latest routine update for the driver. AMDVLK 2019.Q2.5 updates against the Vulkan SDK 1.1.109 headers, enables scratch bounds checking for GFX9/Vega, attachment image memory type support for VK_MEMORY_OVERALLOCATION_BEHAVIOR_ALLOWED_AMD, and optimizations for the acquire-release barrier.

  • Vulkan 1.1.111 Released With Various Fixes

    Released for E3 week is Vulkan 1.1.111, but it's not particularly exciting. 

    Vulkan 1.1.110 was released last week and brought with it two new extensions while Vulkan 1.1.111 is a more mundane update focused on documentation corrections/clarifications.

  • R300 Gallium3D Driver Finally Wired Up For On-Disk Shader Cache

    Continuing on from the story a few days ago about R300 Gallium3D seeing a big performance fix after being regressed in recent years, another potential bonus is in store. 

    Potentially helping out performance or at least smoothing out frame-rates is a tentative patch wiring up Mesa's on-disk GLSL shader cache to the R300g driver. The GLSL shader cache is shared among the Mesa drivers so it actually took just a few dozen lines of code extending it to R300g. But with no upstream Mesa developers actively advancing R300g, this shader cache functionality hadn't come until an independent contributor stepped up to the plate.

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