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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia Uses "Open Source" for Marketing of Expensive Hardware

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Nvidia to publish open source version of Quake II RTX

    HEXUS shared the Quake II RTX video as an appendage to the news about real-time raytracing coming to the GTX 1060 or higher, back in March, during the GTC 2019 event. In brief, the video was presented by Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang during the opening keynote of GTC 2019. The demo's real-time ray traced global illumination and reflections, HDR visuals, dynamic direct and indirect lighting effects, mimicked physical material light reflection properties, and volumetric lighting effects were met with rapturous applause by GTC attendees.

  • NVIDIA To Transform Quake II RTX Demo Into An Open Source Retro Gaming Classic

    Applause broke out from the crowd at GTC 2019 when NVIDIA showcased a modded version of Quake II with overhauled graphics featuring real-time ray tracing and HDR visuals. Quake II RTX, as it is called, looks almost like a completely different game than the original version that launched over two decades ago. It was an impressive demo for sure, but NVIDIA has bigger plans for the mod.

    "Our goal is to publish an open source version of Quake II RTX," Principal DevTech Engineer and Quake II RTX's lead programmer, Alexey Panteleev, told AusGamers in an interview.

  • NVIDIA To Release Open Source Version Of The Quake II RTX Demo In The Future

    Last month, during GDC 2019, NVIDIA showed an impressive Quake II RTX demo, which showed how ray tracing can improve even old games, and it seems like players will soon be able to experience it for themselves.

    Speaking with Aus Gamers, Alexey Panteleev, the lead programmer of the Quake II RTX demo, confirmed that an open source version of it will be released in the future.

NVIDIA on LInux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

    As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors.

    The NVIDIA 418.52.05 beta driver released on Friday now officially supports the company's Vulkan ray-tracing extension going back to GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. The line-up going back to the GeForce GTX 1060, including the Volta-based Titan V and Turing GTX 1600 series now has the ability to utilize Vulkan-powered ray-tracing. This is nice for developers though for Linux end-users/gamers there isn't any significant available yet utilizing Vulkan ray-tracing besides a few code samples and some early engine work for allowing the functionality; most of the ray-tracing activity has been on the Windows side and focused on DirectX 12, but hopefully that will change.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose

    In our last blogpost NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we did found out, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already pre-installed on this great ARM board.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Upgrade Docker Engine

    In our last blogposts about the NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction and NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we know, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already installed, but…

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2

    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release.

    Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.

  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN

    To all X.Org Foundation Members:

    The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019.

    Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms.

    There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/

    The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting.

    Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote:

    Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/

    If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org.

    When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference.

    For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates.

    After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button.

    After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast.

    Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members.

    Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee

  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections

    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections.

    At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

Graphics and Hardware: NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, Mesa, VirGL and Xeon Platinum

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction

    Let me introduce the brand new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which is basically a quad-core 64bit ARM Cortex-A57 CPU with 128 GPU cores - suitable for all kinds of maker ideas: AI, Robotics, and of course for running Docker Containers…

  • Mesa's Vulkan Drivers See More Extension Work Ahead Of The 19.1 Branching

    Mesa 19.1 is due to be released at the end of May and for that to be the feature freeze is in two weeks followed by the weekly release candidates. With the feature development ending soon for this next quarterly Mesa release, the Radeon "RADV" and Intel "ANV" Vulkan driver developers in particular have been quite busy on their remaining feature work.

    On the RADV front, this morning brought VK_EXT_inline_uniform_block support. This is the Vulkan extension to let uniform blocks be backed directly with descriptor sets.

  • VIRTIO 1.1 Released With 2D Graphics Support, Evdev Input Device

    The Virtual I/O Device standard has christened its VIRTIO 1.1 specification this month. This is the virtualization standard around network/storage/graphics/other-hardware in mind for cross-hypervisor compatibility.

    VIRTIO 1.1 brings a GPU device type at this stage providing 2D acceleration that pairs with the VirGL efforts.

  • Running Intel MKL-DNN On 2 x Xeon Platinum 8280 CPUs With GCC 9 "Cascadelake" Tuning

    On the dual Xeon Platinum 8280 server built on a Gigabyte Xeon Scalable barebones setup while running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, I did some quick tests of this initial MKL-DNN profile while using the current GCC 9.0.1 compiler. The GCC9 compiler will debut as stable in the next few weeks in the form of "GCC 9.1" as the first stable release and with this annual GNU compiler update is the initial "cascadelake" target that includes enabling AVX-512 VNNI support over the existing "skylake-avx512" target that is used for 1st Gen Xeon Scalable CPUs. I ran MKL-DNN benchmarks both when built by GCC9's skylake-avx512 target and then again with cascadelake while "-O3" was also part of the CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS. 

Ubuntu 19.04 Radeon Linux Gaming Performance: Popular Desktops Benchmarked, Wayland vs. X.Org

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Leading up to the Ubuntu 19.04 release, several premium supporters requested fresh results for seeing the X.Org vs. Wayland performance overhead for gaming, how GNOME Shell vs. KDE Plasma is performing for current AMD Linux gaming, and related desktop comparison graphics/gaming metrics. Here are such benchmarks run from the Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" while benchmarking GNOME Shell both with X.Org and Wayland, Xfce, MATE, Budgie, KDE Plasma, LXQt, and Openbox.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card with the stock Ubuntu 19.04 components were used for this desktop graphics/gaming benchmark comparison. Ubuntu 19.04 ships with the Linux 5.0 kernel, Mesa 19.0.2, and X.Org Server 1.20.4 as the most prominent components for this comparison. GNOME Shell 3.32.0, Xfce 4.12, MATE 1.20.4, KDE Plasma 5.15.4, Budgie, LXQt 0.14.1, and Openbox 3.6.1 are the prominent desktop versions to report. KDE Plasma with Wayland wasn't tested since on this system I wasn't able to successfully start the session when selecting the Wayland version of Plasma from the log-in manager. The Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card was running from the common Core i9 9900K used by many of our graphics tests with the ASUS PRIME Z390-A motherboard, 16GB of RAM, Samsung 970 EVO 256GB NVMe SSD, and a 4K display.

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Graphics: DRM-Next, Vulkan in Steam and GLAMOR

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • More Icelake Graphics Fixes Are On The Way With The Linux 5.2 Kernel

    Intel's open-source developers sent in another pull request this morning to DRM-Next of additional feature material they are planning on having in the upcoming Linux 5.2 kernel.

    Already for this next kernel in previous pull requests they staged the Elkhart Lake graphics support, promoted Gen11 / Icelake out of being experimental graphics along with other Gen11 graphics fixes, and a variety of other fixes and low-level improvements.

  • Stable Steam Client Gets Vulkan Pipeline Collection, Better NTFS, Steam Play Fixes

    On Wednesday night Valve issued their latest stable Steam client update and carries much of the work we've seen out of their recent beta releases.

    This Steam client update is notable for Linux users in that Steam Play configuration settings are now exposed in Big Picture Mode, the important fix for 0-byte downloads / missing data files for Steam Play titles, Steam Overlay issues, automatic update issues with these titles relying upon Proton, and other Steam Play bugs.

  • GLAMOR Sees More Improvements For What Will Eventually Be X.Org Server 1.21

    We haven't been seeing as much GLAMOR activity these days but then again the pace of X.Org Server development has certainly slowed up in recent years. GLAMOR as a reminder allows for X.Org Server 2D acceleration to happen in a generic manner via OpenGL / GLES and has been a common area for improvement.

    There hasn't been much to report on GLAMOR's development in recent months with it generally working out well already on X.Org Server 1.20, at least for desktop systems with modern OpenGL drivers. Eric Anholt of Broadcom on Wednesday landed the latest GLAMOR code into X.Org Server Git.

Graphics: GLFW, OpenGL, Vulkan and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GLFW 3.3 Adds Vulkan macOS Support Via MoltenVK, Better HiDPI & Scaling

    GLFW is the traditionally OpenGL library (now also encompassing the Vulkan graphics API) that offers a basic API for the creation of windows/contexts/surfaces across software platforms. GLFW works for both desktop and mobile, various devices, and works across all major operating systems while being under the liberal Zlib license. GLFW 3.3 is now available with some exciting enhancements.

  • Intel's New Iris Driver Gets Speed Boost From Changing The OpenGL Vendor String

    Following yesterday's Intel Iris vs. i965 OpenGL benchmarks against Windows 10, there is already an optimization out of our latest testing as a result.

    Iris driver lead developer Kenneth Graunke of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center landed a change in Mesa 19.1 today to really help out the performance in at least Valve's Portal game. In our benchmarks yesterday, Iris was coming in at 52 FPS to i965's 69 FPS and Windows 10 at 75 FPS. With the quick change in Mesa Git today, Ken finds on at least his system to get 1.8x better Portal performance where Iris equates to being 3.86% faster than the i965 driver.

  • CLVK Still Making Progress As Experimental OpenCL Over Vulkan

    We've seen many efforts like DXVK that are mapping Direct3D atop Vulkan, efforts like Zink in getting OpenGL over Vulkan, and less popular but still progressing is getting OpenCL -- at least a reasonable subset of it -- working under Vulkan. That's what the CLVK project is about and it's been making more progress since we last looked at it on Phoronix.

    [...]

    Since last writing about CLVK, it's picked up support for Talvos as a Vulkan emulator/interpreter for handling SPIR-V modules on the CPU and thus allowing CLVK to operate without a Vulkan-enabled GPU.

  • Mesa 19.1 Likely To See Radeon "RADV" Vulkan FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync Support

    Mesa 19.1 is now even more exciting as RADV's co-lead, Bas Nieuwenhuizen has requested the Radeon Vulkan's FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync support be a blocker bug for this quarterly Mesa update.

    As explained last week, RADV's FreeSync support has been held up by lacking a configuration system to selectively enable the functionality when not dealing with any compositor, multimedia program, or other applications where this variable rate refresh technology could intefere and to only enable FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync for full-screen games. That's been the blocker while a patch has been available for flipping on VRR for RADV.

Vulkan 1.1.107 Released and Mesa 19.1.0 Has a Schedule

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan 1.1.107 Released With Support For Headless Surfaces

    Vulkan 1.1.107 is out today as the newest version of the Vulkan graphics/compute API.

    Vulkan 1.1.107 contains the usual work on different documentation clarifications/corrections while a new extension is VK_EXT_headless_surface, which was contributed by Arm.

  • Mesa 19.1.0 release plan
  • Mesa 19.1 Enters Feature Freeze In Two Weeks, Releasing Around 21 May

    Juan A. Suarez Romero of Igalia is serving as the release manager for Mesa 19.1 and sent out a reminder on Monday of the planned release schedule for this quarterly driver update.

    The release schedule calls for the feature freeze and initial release candidate to happen on 30 April. Following that will be weekly release candidates until the final release is ready. The hope is Mesa 19.1.0 can ship on 21 May, but as we've seen very frequently out of recent release cycles, there is often times release delays of days if not weeks. But long story short, Mesa 19.1.0 should be released around late May or early June.

The Current Intel "Iris" Gallium3D OpenGL Performance Against i965 Mesa, Windows 10 OpenGL

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Graphics/Benchmarks

It's been quite fascinating to watch the development of the Intel Iris Gallium3D driver that has now been in development by their open-source team for more than one year while back in February is where this currently experimental driver was merged into Mesa. It's been over one month since last looking at the Intel Iris Gallium3D performance relative to Intel's default "i965" Mesa OpenGL driver. Here are fresh benchmarks looking not only at their current and next-gen OpenGL Linux driver options but also how that performance compares to their current Windows 10 OpenGL driver.

[...]

The Iris Gallium3D driver is picking up more wins than in our previous rounds of testing for this experimental open-source OpenGL driver. Additionally, in cases where i965 is still delivering better performance is at least closer between these two Mesa drivers than we've seen in the past. So overall the performance is looking up for Iris but there is still more performance optimizations and maturing needed before we'll see Intel switch over the Linux OpenGL driver default. Nevertheless, it should be interesting to see how Iris matures this year as well as their ANV Vulkan driver. Stay tuned for more benchmarks when further Mesa Git commits warrant some additional tests.

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Graphics: Wayland, Nouvea and Unigine Superposition

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Wayland Has A Color Manager Calibration Protocol In The Works

    The latest Wayland protocol in the works is a color manager calibration protocol.

    This experimental protocol is designed to allow a compositor to calibrate a given output, an interface for a calibration/profiling application to send the needed colors to the display, an interface to inform the application of the display depth, setting a specific color on an output, loading an ICC profile for a compositor, and saving the last profile loaded.

  • Nouveau Developer Working On OpenGL Extension To Help With Reverse-Engineering

    Longtime open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver developer Ilia Mirkin is drafting a new OpenGL extension proposal for helping out in driver reverse-engineering efforts.

    The proposed GL_MESA_debug_operations extension is about making it easier to insert arbitrary commands into existing shaders to better understand these operations in different combinations. This extension is designed to help reverse engineering activities like Nouveau as they try to understand NVIDIA's hardware behavior but could have use-cases by other reverse-engineered OpenGL drivers like Freedreno, Panfrost / Lima, Etnaviv, and others. It's also possible this could be used as a sorts of testing/fuzzing different shader operations/behavior.

  • Unigine Superposition 1.1 Adds Linux SteamVR Support, Up To 16K Rendering

    It's already been two years since Unigine Corp introduced their very fascinating Superposition graphics benchmark. Today they have rolled out Unigine Superposition 1.1 as the next installment of this demanding GPU benchmark to showcase the Unigine 2 engine's abilities.

    While most of you were probably hoping this Unigine benchmark update would bring Vulkan API support, sadly it does not. The Unigine 2 engine doesn't yet support Vulkan but the company is said to still be working on that support to complement OpenGL on Linux systems. Unigine Superposition 1.1 still relies upon OpenGL but with this release now supports up to 16K x 16K rendering.

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