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Graphics/Benchmarks

7-Way Linux Distribution Comparison For Summer 2016

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of Fedora 24, Solus 1.2, and other GNU/Linux distribution updates, here is our latest performance testing roundabout of seven popular OS releases on the same Core i5 Skylake system.

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Radeon RX 480 Linux Testing Is Happening Right Now

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Not that I can share any early benchmark figures or anything of the Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" graphics card, but the testing commenced today... But I can at least share a couple images.

Yep, AMD sent over a Radeon RX 480 graphics card for being able to provide launch-day Linux benchmarks next week. That day is 29 June when the embargo expires and the RX 480 cards will begin to hit stores for the $199+ price-tag (or slightly more for the 8GB version).

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Kernel Space Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Trying Various OpenGL 4.x Games On Linux With An Intel Skylake Core i5

    With the imminent Mesa 12.0 release there is now OpenGL 4.3 compliance for Intel Broadwell graphics hardware and newer, rather than OpenGL 3.3 as was the upper limit in the Intel Mesa driver to this point. Now having OpenGL 4.x support with this open-source Intel driver, I decided to see how various OpenGL 4.x games are running with the Intel driver when using a Skylake CPU sporting HD Graphics 530.

  • AMDGPU Fixes For Polaris Queuing Up For Linux 4.7

    Yesterday I mentioned how the AMDGPU driver needed some important last minute fixes for the soon-to-launch Radeon RX 480 "Polaris" support. Those patches are now pending to be pulled as part of the next round of DRM fixes heading into Linux 4.7.

  • Intel Submits Another Batch Of DRM Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.8

    Just weeks after their first round of DRM updates for Linux 4.8 were submitted, the Intel crew has their second -- of a possible three -- feature updates readied for the Linux 4.8 kernel via DRM-Next.

  • Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Last RC Is Out Now

    As expected, the fourth and last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 has been announced on June 21, 2016, by Collabora's Emil Velikov.

    Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Release Candidate 4 incorporates the latest fixes and improvements that the development team behind the open-source Mesa 3D project managed to introduce during the last week, since the release of the third Mesa 3D 12.0.0 RC build.

Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Trying The Intel Vulkan Driver On Skylake With Dota 2 + Talos Principle

    With the recent report that Intel's Vulkan Linux driver should now work with Dota 2, I was curious to test out the game -- and Talos Principle -- with the latest Mesa Git code that houses this open-source "Anvil" Vulkan driver.

    With the Padoka PPA now shipping the Intel Vulkan driver by default, it's super easy on Ubuntu-based Linux systems to fetch a Mesa Git snapshot within the past day or two that does have the Vulkan driver for Intel hardware built and enabled. So that's what I went with for trying Mesa 12.1-dev state of the Intel Vulkan driver as of today on a Core i5 6600K "Skylake" box running Ubuntu 16.04.

  • Why The R9 290 & Other Select Radeon GPUs Are Performing Miserably On Linux 4.7

    With this weekend's 5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison and other tests I've done on Linux 4.7 Git with Radeon hardware, the R9 290 has regressed to the point of performing noticeably worse than other AMD GCN GPUs... Many other Phoronix readers with different Rx 200/300 graphics cards have also confirmed their graphics cards performing poorly on Linux 4.7.

  • NVIDIA Launches Tesla P100 PCI-E Card
  • Mesa Lands Support For GL_EXT_window_rectangles

    The newest OpenGL extension now supported by Mesa is GL_EXT_window_rectangles.

    GL_EXT_window_rectangles is a newer OpenGL extension and explained via the OpenGL.org registry, "this extension provides additional orthogonally aligned 'window rectangles' specified in window-space coordinates that restrict rasterization of all primitive types (geometry, images, paths) and framebuffer clears."

5-Way Mesa 12.1-dev + Linux 4.7 Git Radeon Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the massive Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With Radeon Software, AMDGPU-PRO, AMDGPU+RadeonSI article, I immediately started work on my next article... In preparation for a hardware launch Linux testing later this month, I started testing my collection of AMD cards on Linux 4.7 and Mesa 12.1-dev. Here are some of those results if you are curious, including performance-per-Watt metrics.

The cards tested so far this weekend on this bleeding-edge driver stack were the R9 270X, R9 285, R9 290, R7 370, and R9 Fury. Mesa 12.1-dev was from Git yesterday using the Padoka PPA and also built with LLVM 3.9 SVN. The Linux 4.7 kernel was from Git in the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA this week.

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Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With Radeon Software, AMDGPU-PRO, AMDGPU+RadeonSI

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I published some Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Linux gaming benchmarks using the GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards. Those numbers were interesting with the NVIDIA proprietary driver but for benchmarking this weekend are Windows 10 results with Radeon Software compared to Ubuntu 16.04 running the new AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver as well as the latest Git code for a pure open-source driver stack.

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Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 Graphics Performance With NVIDIA's GTX 1070 & GTX 1080

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

For your viewing pleasure this Friday is our largest Windows vs. Linux graphics/gaming performance comparison ever conducted at Phoronix in the past 12 years! With the brand new NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 graphics cards, their performance was compared under Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.04 x86_64 when using the very latest NVIDIA Corp drivers for each OS. A range of Steam gaming benchmarks and more were done, including some cross-platform Vulkan graphics benchmarks. Continue on for this interesting comparison.

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Mesa 12.0 3D Graphics Library to No Longer Provide a Single VAAPI Driver Backend

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Collabora's Emil Velikov has announced the release and general availability of the third and likely the last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Mesa 12.0.0 3D Graphics Library.

Mesa 3D Graphics Library 12.0.0 Release Candidate 3 arrives more than a week after the second RC version, bringing a total of 111 changes to most of the included graphics drivers and components. The full changelog has been attached at the end of the article just in case you're wondering what's new in this update.

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Also: Here's my own Linux OpenGL vs Vulkan test for Dota 2, not much difference for me

Vulkan Linux Performance

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GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • A new benchmark video shows Dota 2 with Vulkan performing better on Windows than Linux

    This is sad to see. A new benchmark video for Windows and Linux using Dota 2 actually shows Windows doing quite a lot better than Linux.

  • Running The Latest Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Benchmarks

    Now that my Linux reviews of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 have been published, next on my agenda this week are running some fresh Windows vs. Linux graphics benchmarks with these Pascal graphics cards.

    I'm planning on making this a rather interesting comparison and will include our first Vulkan benchmarks under both operating systems too. Still deciding the complete set of graphics/game tests being run under Windows and Linux, besides our usual cross-platform compatible test profiles.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more