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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA 367.44 Stable Linux Driver Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While the NVIDIA 370 Linux driver series is currently in beta, the 367 driver series has been updated as the latest long-lived branch release.

The Pascal-based TITAN X, GeForce GTX 1060 3GB, and GTX 1060 6GB are now officially supported... That's just with regards to proper product detection as I've been using the GTX 1060 fine on earlier driver releases, etc.

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Also: Nvidia 367.44 Driver Adds TITAN X (Pascal) and GeForce GTX 1060 Support to Linux

Nouveau Open-Source NVIDIA Tests On Linux 4.8, Mesa 12.1-dev

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Graphics/Benchmarks

I haven't run any Nouveau driver benchmarks recently for looking at the open-source NVIDIA Linux performance since there hasn't been too much progress, particularly when it comes to re-clocking of the desktop GPUs for delivering better performance. However, with all the testing I've been doing on the Radeon side with Linux 4.8 and Mesa 12.1-dev Git, I decided to do a comparison with a few NVIDIA GeForce GPUs under this latest open-source driver stack.

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Trying Out Fedora 25 With Wayland, Early Benchmarks Included

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

With the news from Friday that Fedora 25 will run Wayland by default I loaded up the current Fedora 25 development packages on a test system this weekend and I used that as my primary system for all of my business/production work this weekend. It went well and included are some early gaming benchmarks of Fedora 25 Workstation GNOME on Wayland and X.Org.

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Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Skylake Multi-Screen Issues On Linux Still Happening
  • Skylake EDAC Driver Is A Late Addition To Linux 4.8 Kernel
  • AMD Launches Open Source Ray Traced VR Audio Tech “TrueAudio Next”

    AMD has announced TrueAudio Next a “scalable” physics-based audio rendering engine for generating environmentally accurate, GPU accelerated audio for virtual reality.

    AMD has announced a set of key technologies to bolster its open source technology arsenal represented by GPUOpen, this time in the field of immersive VR audio. TrueAudio Next, AMD claim, provides “real-time dynamic physics-based audio acoustics rendering” and that any soundscape can now be modelled physically, taking into account reflection and occlusion.

    With GPUOpen and LiquidVR, AMD continues to pitch its tent in the open source camp, a reaction to its main rival NVIDIA’s approach which focuses largely on proprietary, GPU hardware and driver locked Gameworks VR (now known as VRWorks) initiatives and technologies – i.e. things that will only work if you develop for and buy their graphics cards.

10-Way Radeon/AMDGPU Benchmarks On Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1 Git

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Continuing off from the fresh open-source AMDGPU test data from yesterday's AMDGPU-PRO vs. open-source Polaris + Fiji comparison, here are more AMD graphics cards tested from the Linux 4.8 development code paired with Mesa 12.1 Git.

The GPUs tested for this weekend benchmarking fun were the Radeon HD 6870. HD 7950. R7 260X. R9 270X, R9 285, R7 370, R9 Fury, RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480. All tests happened from Mesa 12.1-dev via the Padoka PPA this week on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS paired with the Linux 4.8 kernel from 18 August. Note that with Mesa Git on pre-GCN GPUs there is only OpenGL 4.4 support for the Radeon HD 5800/6900 series while all other cards such as the HD 6870 are still currently bound to OpenGL 3.3 due to lacking FP64 emulation support.

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OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Performance Benchmarks Against Other Linux/BSD Distributions

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Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 was released last week and since then many Phoronix readers have inquired about benchmarks of it since it's the first major GNU/Linux distribution using the LLVM Clang compiler by default over GCC.

Thus in continuing my recent BSD and Linux OS performance comparison, here are results of OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 out-of-the-box compared to many other distributions using the same Xeon Skylake hardware platform.

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AMDGPU-PRO vs. Open-Source Gallium3D OpenGL Performance On Polaris Is A Very Tight Race

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering how AMD's hybrid "AMDGPU-PRO" Linux driver stack compares to the latest pure open-source driver stack of the AMDGPU kernel driver and RadeonSI Gallium3D driver, here are side-by-side results for the Radeon RX 460, RX 470, and RX 480 Polaris hardware as well as the R9 Fury (Fiji) graphics card.

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Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Benchmarks: 2 BSDs vs. 7 Linux Distributions

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GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

The operating systems tested for this comparison included CentOS Linux 7, Clear Linux 9710, DragonFlyBSD 4.6.0, Fedora 24, FreeBSD 11.0-Beta 4, Manjaro 16.06.1, OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, and a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 16.10. For those wondering about OpenMandriva Lx 3.0, I'll have tests of that Clang-compiled distribution later in the week. This BSD/Linux OS comparison grew out of curiosity sake when first seeking to test how well DragonFlyBSD 4.6 and FreeBSD 11 are performing.

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Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • The future is here
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  • GUADEC’16 report
    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place. It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.
  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg
    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.

Fedora News

  • UDP Failures and RNGs
  • F24-20160823 updated Live isos
    New Kernel means new set of updated lives. I am happy to release the F24-20160823 updated lives isos.
  • Curse you, Jon Masters! Why do you always have to be right!
    Long story short, Fedora 24 came out and I'm given the taste of the same medicine: the video on the ASUS is completely busted. I was able to limp along for now by using the old kernel 4.4.6-301.fc23, but come on, this is clearly a massive regression. Think anyone is there to bisect and find the culprit? Of course not. I have to do it it myself. So, how did F24 ship? Well... I didn't test beta versions, so I don't have much ground to complain.
  • Communication Anti-Patterns
  • Autocloud: What's new?
    Autocloud was released during the Fedora 23 cycle as a part of the Two Week Atomic Process. Previously, it used to listen to fedmsg for successful Koji builds. Whenever, there is a new message the AutocloudConsumer queues these message for processing. The Autocloud job service then listens to the queue, downloads the images and runs the tests using Tunir. A more detailed post about it’s release can be read here. During the Fedora 24 cycle things changed. There was a change on how the Fedora composes are built. Thanks to adamw for writing a detailed blogpost on what, why and how things changed.