Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

The Performance Cost Of Spectre / Meltdown / Foreshadow Mitigations On Linux 4.19

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

One of the most frequent test requests recently has been to look at the overall performance cost of Meltdown/Spectre mitigations on the latest Linux kernel and now with L1TF/Foreshadow work tossed into the mix. With the Linux 4.19 kernel that just kicked off development this month has been continued churn in the Spectre/Meltdown space, just not for x86_64 but also for POWER/s390/ARM where applicable. For getting an overall look at the performance impact of these mitigation techniques I tested three Intel Xeon systems and two AMD EPYC systems as well as a virtual machine on each side for seeing how the default Linux 4.19 kernel performance -- with relevant mitigations applied -- to that of an unmitigated kernel.

Read more

Benchmarks: 96Boards and NVIDIA Jetson TX2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Benchmarks Of The 24-Core ARM Socionext 96Boards Developerbox

    Announced last October was a 24-core ARM developer box being worked on by Linaro/96Boards, Socionext, and Gigabyte. The specifications are appealing with twenty-four ARM 64-bit cores with the SoC on a micro-ATX sized motherboard, support for a PCI Express graphics slot, and onboard Gigabit Ethernet. Here are our first benchmarks of this Socionext 96Boards Developerbox.

  • The NVIDIA Jetson TX2 Performance Has Evolved Nicely Since Launch

    Word this week of the NVIDIA Jetson Xavier Development Kit being up for pre-order reminded me of some benchmarks I had been meaning to do of seeing how the NVIDIA Jetson TX2 developer kit's performance has evolved since its launch a year and a half ago. There's actually a quite measurable improvement in performance with the latest software/drivers compared to it was at launch.

Graphics: GPUOpen, EGMDE, Vega, VKMS, Direct3D, Vulkan VirGL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • GPUOpen's Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.1 Being Prepped With Many Additions

    AMD's GPUOpen group has released their first beta of the Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.1 release after "many months of development" and as such comes with many new features.

    VulkanMemoryAllocator as a refresher is the open-source AMD effort to provide an easy-to-use and integrate Vulkan memory allocation library to ease the process of bringing up new Vulkan code. The VulkanMemoryAllocator is used by the likes of Google's Filament renderer, vkDoom3, LWJGL, the Anvil framework, and others.

  • Mir's EGMDE "Edge" Now Has Experimental X11 Support, Static Display Configuration

    Ubuntu's Mir display server that has been chasing Wayland support and earlier this year introduced EGMDE as the example Mir desktop environment has picked up some extra functionality on its "edge" channel.

    Thanks to Ubuntu's Snappy, via Snap it's now possible to have both beta and edge channels of EGMDE with easy installation. Their edge channel of EGMDE will be where they ship their experimental/bleeding-edge features. In making use of this new functionality, to the EGMDE edge channel they have introduced some new capabilities.

  • More Vega 20 Enablement Heading To Linux 4.20~5.0, No Longer Marked Experimental

    While the Linux 4.19 kernel merge window just ended this past weekend and the development cycle for Linux 4.20 (or most likely to be called Linux 5.0) won't kick off until around the middle of October, AMD has already begun staging a ton of changes for this next kernel version. In particular, it looks like with this next kernel release their Vega 20 enablement will be in order.

  • The DRM GPU Scheduler Got Beefed Up This Summer, More Improvements Possible

    In addition to the VKMS driver for virtual kernel mode-setting, the other successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project this summer under the X.Org umbrella was improving the DRM GPU scheduler.

    The DRM GPU scheduler is what was the AMDGPU scheduler before it was punted out into DRM common code so this GPU scheduler could be re-used by other Direct Rendering Manager drivers like Etnaviv and Linux-Lima. As part of GSoC 2018, Nayan Deshmukh worked on improvements to the DRM GPU scheduler with a particular focus on being able to feed one entity into multiple run queues.

  • wineSHOCK: The Automated Direct3D Game Benchmarks On Wine

    Given Valve's now public Steam Play for Linux using the Wine-derived Proton and their ongoing relationship with Code Weavers to improve the experience for Windows games on Linux, it perhaps adds better context why this summer for GSoC there was the automated Direct3D game benchmarking work with mentorship by a CodeWeavers developer.

    This summer we've been covering the work by student developer Dimitris Gounaridis on better Direct3D game benchmarks within Wine. After all, this Google Summer of Code project is facilitated using the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org.

  • Vulkan VirGL Ends The Summer Being Able To Execute A Compute Shader

    One of the most interesting projects we've seen attempted for Google Summer of Code 2018 was adding Vulkan support to VirGL for allowing Vulkan access within guest virtual machines.

    The VirGL stack has been getting into great shape with its OpenGL 4 support while up until this summer there wasn't much effort on getting the Vulkan graphics/compute API handled by this stack that leverages Mesa, VirtIO-GPU, and the "virglrenderer" component to make all of this magic happen.

Clear Linux Rolling Out KDE Plasma Desktop Support, Plus Some Benchmarks Against GNOME Shell

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center started out with Xfce as its lone desktop option and then added and moved over to the GNOME Shell as the default desktop. While GNOME Shell remains the default desktop choice for this rolling-release Linux distribution, KDE components have begun appearing in recent days.

On Clear Linux it's now just a swupd bundle-add desktop-kde command away from getting a Plasma 5 desktop on this high-performance Linux stack. Also new are the desktop-kde-apps and desktop-kde-libs bundles, though they are included as part of the desktop-kde bundle. Over the weekend the KDE Plasma desktop became functional on Clear Linux.

Read more

The Tighter NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon Linux Gaming Battle With 396.54 + Mesa 18.3-dev Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week NVIDIA released the 396.54 driver that has a significant performance fix for OpenGL/Vulkan Linux performance due to a resource leak regression introduced at the start of the 390 driver series. With that updated driver (also as of yesterday back-ported to 390.87 too), there is a measurable boost in performance after running a few games on NVIDIA Linux systems. But at the same time, the Mesa 18.3-dev open-source graphics driver stack with RadeonSI/RADV continues improving on the open-source AMD front. Here is a fresh look at how the latest AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards compare using these latest drivers.

Read more

Fresh NVIDIA vs. AMD Radeon OpenCL GPU Benchmarks For August 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

It has been a while since last delivering some OpenCL GPU compute benchmarks across several different graphics cards on the latest Linux drivers, so here is a fresh look.

Tests were done using the the NVIDIA 396.54 Linux driver with the GeForce GTX 1070 / 1070 Ti / 1080 / 1080 Ti graphics cards. On the AMD side was the newest AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 driver release with testing a Radeon RX Vega 56 and RX Vega 64.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA 390.87 Linux Driver Backports That Important Performance Fix

Benchmarks Of Intel's Latest Linux Microcode Update

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

With all of the confusion last week over Intel's short-lived CPU microcode license change that forbid benchmarking only for them to change it a short time later -- to a much nicer license in that the microcode files can be easily redistributed and don't curtail it in other manners (and also re-licensing their FSP too), here are some performance benchmarks when trying out this latest Intel microcode on Linux.

[...]

In the benchmarks run over the weekend, the latest Intel microcode files for August (taking Xeon Scalable CPUs to 0x200004d appeared to have only minimal impact on the system performance... Mostly in I/O cases were there some slight differences in performance, but nothing overly shocking and not as bad as the L1TF Linux kernel mitigation itself -- see those benchmarks for all the details. Going into this microcode comparison I was expecting much more volatile results given their short-lived benchmark restriction, but it looks like it may have just been an overzealous Intel lawyer who thought it would be a good idea to forbid benchmarking and further lock-down their microcode license...

Read more

The New & Improved Features Of The Linux 4.19 Kernel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The Linux 4.19-rc1 kernel is expected to be released today and with that marks the end of feature development on this next kernel version. Here is a look at the new and improved features to be found in Linux 4.19.

Linux 4.19 has been an interesting cycle and was fairly eventful but some problematic pull requests led Linus Torvalds to calling it a horrible merge window From our original reporting over the past two weeks, highlights of the Linux 4.19 kernel include:

Read more

Graphics: Jerome Glisse's Work and a Move to Gitlab

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Heterogeneous Memory Management Still Being Worked On For Nouveau / Radeon / Intel

    Longtime Red Hat developer Jerome Glisse has published his latest patches concerning the Heterogeneous Memory Management support, a.k.a. HMM.

    Heterogeneous Memory Management was merged in Linux 4.14 as one of the kernel pieces sought after by NVIDIA and other vendors. HMM allows a process address space to be mirrored and system memory to be transparently used by any device process.

  • The Linux DRM Projects Are Plotting Their Transition To Gitlab

    With many of the FreeDesktop.org projects having already transitioned from their CGit and hodgepodge of services over to Gitlab, the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) trees appear to be up next.

    Having already made the move this year to the new FreeDesktop.org Gitlab deployment has been Mesa, the X.Org Server, and many of the smaller repositories. This FreeDesktop Gitlab instance running on Google Compute Engine has been a big improvement for the project compared to their aging bare metal servers, their administration resources stretched thin, and Gitlab offering a modern UI compared to CGit and friends. Longer term, Gitlab should yield them more capabilities too around continuous integration and other modern development features.

Graphics: Wayland 1.16, Weston 5.0 and Mesa 18.1.7

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • weston 5.0.0

    This is the official release of weston 5.0.0.

  • Wayland 1.16 Released, Likely The Last Time-Based Release, Plus Weston 5.0

    Current Wayland/Weston release manager Derek Foreman of Samsung OSG today announced the release of Wayland 1.16 as well as the Weston 5.0 reference compositor.

    Wayland 1.16 brings build system updates, drops the wl_buffer definition, the protocol now supports a zero physical size output, and other small work... Really nothing too major in Wayland 1.16.

  • mesa 18.1.7

    Mesa 18.1.7 is now available for general consumption. This release has been rather small compared to the last few release, There's just a handful of fixes in total. Meson, radv, anv, gallium winsys, intel, i965, and r600 were the only recipients of fixs this go around.

  • Mesa 18.1.7 Released With Few Bug Fixes

    Mesa 18.1.7 ships with the last two weeks worth of fixes in the Mesa stable space. But overall this isn't nearly as big as past Mesa 18.1 point releases. Mesa 18.1.7 has some minor fixes to R600 Gallium3D, Intel i965, RADV Vulkan driver fixes, the Doom workaround has been back-ported to RADV, and a variety of other fixes.'

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance Against Ubuntu 18.10, Fedora 29

As the latest of our benchmarks using the newly re-released Microsoft Windows 10 October 2018 Update, here are benchmarks of this latest Windows 10 build against seven different Linux distributions on the same hardware for checking out the current performance of these operating systems. For this latest Linux OS benchmarking comparison against Windows, the following platforms were tested: - The Windows 10 April 2018 release as the previous major milestone of Windows 10. - The newest Windows 10 October 2018 build as the latest Windows 10 build from Microsoft. - OpenSUSE Tumbleweed as the openSUSE rolling-release distribution that as of testing was on the Linux 4.18.12 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.14, Mesa 18.1.7, and GCC 8.2.1 atop an XFS home file-system with Btrfs root file-system (the default partitioning scheme). Read more

Android Leftovers

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.51.0

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner. Read more Also: KDE Frameworks 5.51 Released

Linux 4.19-rc8

As mentioned last week, here's a -rc8 release as it seems needed. There were a lot of "little" pull requests this week, semi-normal for this late in the cycle, but a lot of them were "fix up the previous fix I just sent" which implies that people are having a few issues still. I also know of at least one "bad" bug that finally has a proposed fix, so that should hopefully get merged this week. And there are some outstanding USB fixes I know of that have not yet landed in the tree (I blame me for that...) Anyway, the full shortlog is below, lots of tiny things all over the tree. Please go and test and ensure that all works well for you. Hopefully this should be the last -rc release. Read more Also: Linux 4.19-rc8 Released With A Lot Of "Tiny Things"