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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: AMD, Intel and Hikari

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Linux Graphics Driver To Better Handle Power Savings During Compute Workloads

    This should be working for both single and multi-GPU setups and obviously benefits compute-focused systems in particular. Hopefully this BACO for KFD support will get buttoned up in time for the AMD Radeon changes for Linux 5.7.

  • Intel's Linux Graphics Stack Is Close To Landing A Code-Generator Generator

    Intel's Linux graphics stack has seen a lot of major changes in recent years besides the addition of their "ANV" Vulkan driver. The Intel Linux OpenGL driver saw their new Gallium3D driver, NIR has come about as the new intermediate representation used across their drivers, and other fundamental changes and improvements. The latest underlying work is introducing a pattern-based code generator for their graphics compiler.

    Longtime open-source Intel Linux developer Ian Romanick spoke at FOSDEM 2020 this weekend in Brussels about the automatic, pattern-based code generation he's been working on for the Intel Mesa code. This comes after more than a decade of experimenting with the idea before of a code-generator generator only to hit roadblocks.

  • Hikari Is A FreeBSD-Focused X11 Window Manager + Wayland Compositor

    Hikari is a stacking window manager with tiling support that has also work-in-progress code for serving as a Wayland compositor. However, unlike most X11 window managers and Wayland compositors being focused on Linux systems, Hikari is BSD-focused.

    Hikari was presented at this weekend's Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting (FOSDEM) in Brussels as a window manager / compositor initially targeting FreeBSD but is being ported ultimately to other platforms as well: Hikari can also be built for OpenBSD and the Wayland support should work on Linux systems.

The $199 Motile M141 With AMD Ryzen 3 3200U Offers Surprisingly Decent Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week we published benchmarks of the Motile M141, Walmart's private-label tech branch, and the M141 being a Ryzen 3 3200U powered laptop that has been retailing for just $199 USD. In those initial benchmarks was an extensive look at the Windows vs. Linux performance while this article today is looking at the performance of this AMD Ryzen 3 laptop against a number of old and new Intel laptops, all tested using a daily snapshot of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

Eight laptops I had available were tested for putting the performance of this $199 USD laptop in perspective. Though as one unfortunate item: since running the original article and all the publicity on the Motile M141, Walmart has increased its price at least temporarily to $279 USD. We'll see if it falls back to $199 in the days ahead but even at $279 is still a decent deal. The laptops I had available for testing in this comparison included...

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Nvidia 440.59 Graphics Driver Adds PRIME Synchronization Support, More

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia released today the Nvidia 440.59 long-lived graphics driver for UNIX systems to add a few enhancements and fix various bugs.

Available for Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems, the Nvidia 440.59 proprietary graphics driver disables frame rate limiting on systems without active displays when HardDPMS is enabled and fixes an X crash on systems with multi-GPU Screen configurations by restricting the maximum number of GPU Screens to one per device.

Furthermore, it improves the saving of configuration files in nvidia-settings by adding a default filename when no configuration file is detected, and patches another bug that could cause the X server to crash.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA 440.59 Linux Driver Brings DP MST Audio, PRIME Sync For Linux 5.4+

Graphics: vkBasalt 0.3, State of Nouveau and Keith Packard on X

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • vkBasalt 0.3 Vulkan Layer Adds Support For Using Reshade Fx Shaders

    The vkBasalt open-source project began as just providing Contrast Adaptive Sharpening support for Linux/Vulkan games similar to Radeon Image Sharpening. This Vulkan post-processing layer then added an option for applying FXAA anti-aliasing and then SMAA and other effects. Now vkBasalt 0.3 is out today with even more post-processing features.

    With vkBasalt 0.3 the headlining feature is that this Vulkan layer can make use of most Reshade Fx shaders. ReShade is a collection of post-processing effects from color correction to ambient occlusion to various other visual features and the software is for Windows. But with the Reshade Fx shaders being open-source, vkBasalt now supports using those as part of this Vulkan post-processing layer.

  • Nouveau Still Pushing Forward In 2020 Thanks To Red Hat But Community Developers Leaving

    While Karol works on Nouveau in an official capacity at Red Hat with a focus on SPIR-V/OpenCL compute and Red Hat also employs Nouveau DRM maintainer Ben Skeggs and other open-source graphics driver developers like Jerome Glisse, there isn't much Nouveau work outside of Red Hat. Karol did point out they do have a new Red Hat intern working on Nouveau shader cache support too. But there isn't too much left to the Nouveau developer community.

  • [Keith Packard] Prototyping a Vulkan Extension — VK_MESA_present_period

    I've been messing with application presentation through the Vulkan API for quite a while now, first starting by exploring how to make head-mounted displays work by creating DRM leases as described in a few blog posts: 1, 2, 3, 4.

    [...]

    At first, I assumed I'd have to hack up the X server, and maybe the kernel itself to make this work. So I started specifying changes to the X present extension and writing a pile of code in the X server.

    Queuing the first presentation to the kernel was easy; with no previous presentation needing to be kept on the screen for a specified period, it just gets sent right along.

    For subsequent presentations, I realized that I needed to wait until I learned when the earlier presentations actually happened, which meant waiting for a kernel event. That kernel event immediately generates an X event back to the Vulkan client, telling it when the presentation occurred.

    Once I saw that both X and Vulkan were getting the necessary information at about the same time, I realized that I could wait in the Vulkan code rather than in the X server.

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Performance On A $199 AMD Ryzen Laptop

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Graphics/Benchmarks

When carrying out our Windows vs. Linux benchmarks we normally are doing so on interesting high-end hardware but for today's benchmarking is a look at how a $199 USD laptop powered by an AMD Ryzen 3 3200U processor compares between Windows 10 as it's shipped on the laptop against the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux distribution.

The $199 AMD laptop being used for testing is the Motile M141, a 14-inch laptop with Ryzen 3 3200U and Vega 3 graphics, 4GB of RAM, 120GB solid-state drive, and 1080p display. This 14-inch Ryzen 3 laptop is currently selling for just $199 USD at Walmart. While never hearing of Motile previously, I decided to go ahead and buy this laptop for some Linux testing... Motile is a private-label brand from Walmart.

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Graphics: Mir/Wayland, NVIDIA and RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • UBports' Unity 8 Has Working Wayland Support

    UBports has managed to upgrade their Mir support so Unity 8 can ride off the modern Mir implementation that provides Wayland support. In turn this means Unity 8 (and Ubuntu Touch) can run Wayland applications. There are also other benefits like now being able to run Unity 8 off the upstream Mesa graphics drivers without needing any Mir patches as was formerly the case. This also opens up Unity 8 to running nicely on more Linux distributions.

  • NVIDIA Retiring Their Pre-Fermi "340 Series" Legacy Linux Graphics Driver

    NVIDIA has sent out word that they no longer plan to issue anymore driver updates for their 340 series Linux legacy branch.

    This Linux 340 legacy driver series has provided extended support for the G8x, G9x, and GT2xx GPUs. Or in other words, the GeForce 8 series through GeForce 200 series. Moving forward though they will still be maintaining the NVIDIA 390 driver series that is their legacy driver for the Fermi GPUs.

  • NVIDIA end updates to the 340 series legacy driver for Linux

    If you have an older NVIDIA GPU, chances are you've been using the 340 legacy series. Well, NVIDIA have said that it's no longer getting updates. This does not affect any of their modern GPUs, just to be clear on that point.

    The 340 legacy series is the newest driver that supports NVIDIA GPUs from the GeForce 8 Series from 2006 up to the GeForce 3xx series (rebrands of the GeForce 200 series) from 2009. We're talking GPUs that can be well over ten years old, so it's only natural their support had to end at some point. NVIDIA did recently give it one last update, with the 340.108 released back in December 2019 which boosted compatibility with newer Linux Kernels so hopefully if you're still on it you will be good for a little while.

  • RADV Re-Enables NGG Geometry Shader Support

    On top of the last minute Radeon Vulkan "RADV" improvements landing on Wednesday for Mesa 20.0, another big ticket item landed... Well, re-enabled.

    Back in July shortly after the Radeon RX 5700 series unveil, RADV added NGG geometry shader support for Navi/GFX10. NGG is the Next-Gen Geometry engines found with Navi but as shown by the RADV driver work and RadeonSI OpenGL driver changes, it can be difficult/buggy to target.

mesa 20.0.0-rc1

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Hi list,

It's a day late, but mesa 20.0.0-rc1 is now available. The 20.0 branches
(staging and stable) have been created, and a new 20.0 release milestone has
also been created.

20.0.0-rc2 will follow on 02.05 per the release calendar.

Dylan

Read more

Also: Mesa 20.0-rc1 Released With Intel Gallium3D Default, OpenGL 4.6 for RadeonSI, Vulkan 1.2

DXVK 1.5.3 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Software
Gaming
  • DXVK 1.5.3 Released - Helps Games Like Skyrim + Mafia II, Direct3D 9 Fixes

    Succeeding last week's DXVK 1.5.2 is now a version 1.5.3 release with various fixes.

    Leading to this quick DXVK 1.5.3 release is a fix for a potentially critical Direct3D 9 regression introduced in the previous release. There is also a fix for Vulkan validation errors with D3D9 and on the plus side better GPU-limited D3D9 performance with some Vulkan drivers.

  • Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.5.3 is out fixing up a 'potentially' critical D3D9 regression

    A small but needed release of the Direct 3D 9/10/11 to Vulkan translation layer has been put out today fixing up some issues.

    DXVK 1.5.3 has a rather important fix in as the headliner here, as 1.5.2 had a potential "critical D3D9 regression". Additionally there's some fixed up Vulkan validation errors, improved GPU-limited D3D9 performance on some drivers, and the HUD will now properly show D3D10 when it's used rather than D3D11.

    For game specific fixes Mafia II, Skyrim and Torchlight were all mentioned so each should have a better experience under Wine with DXVK and so Proton too whenever Valve/CodeWeavers update it.

Valve's ACO Helps Put New Life Into Radeon GCN 1.0 GPUs With ~9% Better Linux Gaming Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Among many other Valve ACO back-end improvements for Mesa 20.0, one of the notable additions is this AMDGPU LLVM alternative now working for Radeon "Southern Islands" / GCN 1.0 graphics cards. With this, these original AMD GCN graphics cards may have some extra life out of Linux gaming boxes thanks to slightly higher performance some eight years after these graphics cards first launched in the Radeon HD 7000 series.

ACO is the back-end to the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver that's funded by Valve and optimized for speedy shader compilation to help with game load times and for delivering optimal gaming performance. With the upcoming Mesa 20.0, ACO works from the Radeon GFX10/Navi graphics cards back through the GCN 1.0 products. Granted, by default the Radeon DRM kernel driver is used for these graphics cards so you need to first boot the system with "amdgpu.si_support=1 radeon.si_support=0" for enabling the AMDGPU kernel driver that is needed for allowing RADV to work at all.

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Mesa 19.3.3

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 19.3.3
    Hi list,
    
    I'd like to announce mesa 19.3.3. This release was delayed due to bugs caught in
    CI that needed to be resolved before the release could be made. Due to the
    slightly longer cycle there's slightly more patches than would normally be
    present in the release.
    
    I've also started using a new script to find the patches in master to pick, so
    please ignore any .pick_status.json: commits, they're generated by the new
    script.
    
    There's plenty of changes here, but intel, docs, radeonsi, and aco are the
    biggest sets of changes.
    
    Dylan
    
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Adam Jackson (1):
          drisw: Cache the depth of the X drawable
    
    Andrii Simiklit (1):
          mesa/st: fix a memory leak in get_version
    
    Bas Nieuwenhuizen (2):
          radv: Disable VK_EXT_sample_locations on GFX10.
          radv: Remove syncobj_handle variable in header.
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (1):
          intel/fs: Only use SLM fence in compute shaders
    
    Daniel Schürmann (2):
          aco: fix unconditional demote_to_helper
          aco: rework lower_to_cssa()
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          docs: add SHA256 sums for 19.3.2
          cherry-ignore: Update for 19.3.3
          .pick_status.json: Update to c787b8d2a16d5e2950f209b1fcbec6e6c0388845
          docs: Add relnotes for 19.3.3 release
          VERSION: bump version to 19.3.3
    
    Eric Anholt (1):
          mesa: Fix detection of invalidating both depth and stencil.
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          meson: use github URL for wraps instead of completely unreliable wrapdb
    
    Erik Faye-Lund (8):
          docs: fix typo in html tag name
          docs: fix paragraphs
          docs: open paragraph before closing it
          docs: use code-tag instead of pre-tag
          docs: use code-tags instead of pre-tags
          docs: use code-tags instead of pre-tags
          docs: move paragraph closing tag
          docs: remove double-closed definition-list
    
    Francisco Jerez (3):
          glsl: Fix software 64-bit integer to 32-bit float conversions.
          intel/fs/gen11+: Handle ROR/ROL in lower_simd_width().
          intel/fs/gen8+: Fix r127 dst/src overlap RA workaround for EOT message payload.
    
    Hyunjun Ko (1):
          turnip: fix invalid VK_ERROR_OUT_OF_POOL_MEMORY
    
    Jan Vesely (1):
          clover: Initialize Asm Parsers
    
    Jason Ekstrand (8):
          anv: Flag descriptors dirty when gl_NumWorkgroups is used
          intel/vec4: Support scoped_memory_barrier
          intel/blorp: Fill out all the dwords of MI_ATOMIC
          anv: Don't over-advertise descriptor indexing features
          anv: Memset array properties
          anv/blorp: Rename buffer image stride parameters
          anv: Canonicalize buffer formats for image/buffer copies
          anv: Stop allocating WSI event fences off the instance
    
    Jonathan Marek (1):
          st/mesa: don't lower YUV when driver supports it natively
    
    Kenneth Graunke (2):
          intel/compiler: Fix illegal mutation in get_nir_image_intrinsic_image
          intel: Fix aux map alignments on 32-bit builds.
    
    Lasse Lopperi (1):
          freedreno/drm: Fix memory leak in softpin implementation
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (4):
          anv: fix intel perf queries availability writes
          anv: only use VkSamplerCreateInfo::compareOp if enabled
          intel/perf: expose timestamp begin for mdapi
          intel/perf: report query split for mdapi
    
    Marek Olšák (4):
          ac/gpu_info: always use distributed tessellation on gfx10
          radeonsi: work around an LLVM crash when using llvm.amdgcn.icmp.i64.i1
          radeonsi: clean up how internal compute dispatches are handled
          radeonsi: don't invoke decompression inside internal launch_grid
    
    Nataraj Deshpande (1):
          egl/android: Restrict minimum triple buffering for android color_buffers
    
    Pierre-Eric Pelloux-Prayer (8):
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_retile_dcc
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_expand_fmask
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_clear_render_target
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_copy_image
          radeonsi: release saved resources in si_compute_do_clear_or_copy
          radeonsi: fix fmask expand compute shader
          radeonsi: make sure fmask expand is done if needed
          util: call bind_sampler_states before setting sampler_views
    
    Rhys Perry (8):
          aco: set vm for pos0 exports on GFX10
          aco: fix imageSize()/textureSize() with large buffers on GFX8
          aco: fix uninitialized data in the binary
          aco: set exec_potentially_empty for demotes
          aco: disable add combining for ds_swizzle_b32
          aco: don't DCE atomics with return values
          aco: check if multiplication/clamp is live when applying output modifier
          aco: fix off-by-one error when initializing sgpr_live_in
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (2):
          radv: only use VkSamplerCreateInfo::compareOp if enabled
          radv: fix double free corruption in radv_alloc_memory()
    
    Samuel Thibault (1):
          meson: Do not require libdrm for DRI2 on hurd
    
    Tapani Pälli (1):
          egl/android: fix buffer_count for applications setting max count
    
    Thong Thai (1):
          mesa: Prevent _MaxLevel from being less than zero
    
    Timur Kristóf (1):
          aco/gfx10: Fix VcmpxExecWARHazard mitigation.
    
    
    
    
    git tag: mesa-19.3.3
    
  • Mesa 19.3.3 Released With Many Fixes

    While Mesa 20.0 will be entering its feature freeze this week and branching ahead of the stable release expected in about one month, for now the Mesa 19.3 series is the newest available for stable users.

    Among the fixes to find with Mesa 19.3.3 are listed below while mostly amounting to the usual AMD Radeon and Intel churn along with other core work.

  • Mesa 19.3.3 Released with Improvements for Dead Rising 4, Many Fixes

    The Mesa 3D graphics library has been updated today to version 19.3.3, another bugfix release in the Mesa 19.3 series that addresses various crashes and other issues.

    Mesa 19.3.3 arrives two weeks after version 19.3.2 and it’s here to fix a crash with the Dead Rising 4 action-adventure video game on GFX6 and GFX7 family of AMD GPUs, improve compiling support with GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 10, and a memory leak in the softpin implementation of the Freedreno DRM driver.

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  • Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Xubuntu 20.04 Beta. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 625

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 625 for the week of March 29 – April 4, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu to Fix 4 Flaws

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