Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Fedora vs. Ubuntu vs. openSUSE vs. Clear Linux For Intel Steam Gaming Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With this week Clear Linux now being able to run Steam, I was excited to see how this performance-minded Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center would compare to other more popular Linux distributions when it comes to Intel Linux gaming performance. Here are some benchmarks of this traditionally workstation/server-oriented Intel Linux distribution running some Steam Linux games.

For those that haven't read our past articles with Clear Linux benchmarks, it tends to perform very well for a variety of reasons. Delivering the best Linux performance possible on Intel hardware is one of their driving forces and include features like aggressive CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS by default, using CPUFreq over P-State for CPU frequency scaling, building software packages with function multi-versioning to support both older and newer processors, selectively choosing Clang vs. GCC compilers for each package based upon the performance, carrying some out-of-tree patches, and various other optimizations/tweaks as outlined at ClearLinux.org.

Read more

Linux Graphics: Nouveau, NVIDIA and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Benchmarking Radeon Open Compute ROCm 1.4 OpenCL

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month with AMD/GPUOpen's ROCm 1.4 release they delivered on OpenCL support, albeit for this initial release all of the code is not yet open-source. I tried out ROCm 1.4 with the currently supported GPUs to see how the OpenCL performance compares to just using the AMDGPU-PRO OpenCL implementation.

Read more

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

RADV Improved

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan Driver Support For Multiple Devices

    Open-source driver developer Bas Nieuwenhuizen has posted a patch for allowing the open-source Radeon Mesa Vulkan driver (RADV) to support multiple devices.

  • The open source Vulkan driver for AMD 'radv' now supports using multiple GPUs

    A commit that just landed in Mesa-git allows for 'radv', the open source Vulkan driver for AMD GPUs to use multiple devices.

    This will likely be useful in future for people who have two (or maybe even more) GPUs to really push their games.

    Support for things like that on Linux should improve as Vulkan evolves and is adopted by more developers. Just how useful this will end up being is the real question.

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A Look At The Huge Performance Boosts With Nouveau Mesa 17.0-devel On Maxwell

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Landing this week in Mesa 17.0-devel Git was OpenGL 4.3 for NVC0 Maxwell and a big performance boost as well for these GeForce GTX 750 / 900 series NVIDIA "Maxwell" graphics processors. Here are some before/after benchmarks of the performance improvements, which the patch cited as "1.5~3.5x better", when testing a GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 980.

Read more

Also: Fresh Tests Of Intel Beignet OpenCL

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Etnaviv Gallium3D Driver Lands, Premiering With Mesa 17.0

    In time for this weekend's feature freeze of Mesa 17.0, the Etnaviv Gallium3D driver has landed in Mesa Git after years of work on this reverse-engineered, open-source driver stack.

  • Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Lands Last Minute HiZ Improvements

    Some more exciting last minute work landing in Mesa Git before this weekend's Mesa 17.0 branching are the potentially performance-improving HiZ work within the Intel Vulkan driver.

  • Google releases 'Draco' 3D graphics open source compression library on GitHub

    Google is a significant contributor to the open source community. This is notable, as the company is wildly successful and its products are used by many. It incorporates open source code in its offerings, and then contributes back too. The search giant's visibility lends credibility to open source ideology.

    Today, Google announces yet another open source project. Called "Draco," it is a compression library designed for 3D graphics. The project can dramatically reduce the size of 3D graphic files without significant visual impact to the person viewing.

  • Introducing Draco: compression for 3D graphics

    3D graphics are a fundamental part of many applications, including gaming, design and data visualization. As graphics processors and creation tools continue to improve, larger and more complex 3D models will become commonplace and help fuel new applications in immersive virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Because of this increased model complexity, storage and bandwidth requirements are forced to keep pace with the explosion of 3D data.

  • Google Announces "Draco" For 3D Graphics Compression

    Google's Chrome Media team has developed Draco as an open-source compression library designed for 3D graphics.

  • Fedora 25 Switching Over To Using GLVND For Mesa, Happier NVIDIA Driver Installation

    A Mesa update coming down the pipe for Fedora 25 Linux users will see GLVND support enabled by default.

    GLVND, of course, being the OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch library. This is the NVIDIA-led effort that was also supported by upstream Mesa/X.Org developers for in effect a "new OpenGL Linux ABI" for allowing multiple Linux OpenGL drivers to happily co-exist on the same system. This makes things much easier than having different drivers overwriting the libGL files, complications with driver installation/uninstall, etc. It was long overdue but finally was seeing upstream support in 2016.

  • Wayland 1.13 Planned For Release Next Month

    Wayland 1.13 has been in development since September while the plans today were firmed up for releasing it in February.

  • Tegra/Nouveau Render-Only Gallium3D Support
  • Building Mesa from source, a guide

    If you are using Mesa (FOSS OpenGL/Vulkan drivers on Linux), you can be in situation when it introduces some new features upstream, but it didn't make it into your distribution yet and it can take quite a long time for that to happen. Certain games can become playable with that change, or it can be a performance optimization that speeds up already working games, or may be you simply want to test the newest Mesa itself - either way, you might be interested in running the latest development version of Mesa for various reasons. At the same time you don't want to mess up your system with an unstable graphics stack.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Voyager 9 Linux Distro Enters Development, Now Based on Debian 9 "Stretch"

The developers of the Voyager Linux OS announced the availability of the first Beta build of the upcoming Voyager 9 release, which will be based on the soon-to-be-announced Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system. Read more

Black Lab Linux Gets First Weekly ISOs, Adds Linux Kernel 4.8 from Ubuntu 16.10

Earlier this week, we told you that Black Lab Software, the developers of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux distribution, published the roadmap of the next Black Lab Linux releases. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Linux 4.9.13

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.13 kernel. All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more Also: Linux 4.4.52 Linux 4.10.1