Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

PGI 18.10 Compiler Benchmarks Against GCC 8.2, LLVM Clang 7.0

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recently release of the PGI 18.10 Community Edition compiler by NVIDIA, I was curious to see how the performance on the CPU is looking for this proprietary compiler on Linux. For those curious as well, here are some benchmarks of the PGI 18.10 C/C++ compiler against the GCC 8.2.0 and LLVM Clang 7.0 open-source compilers.

From an Intel Core i9 7980XE system running Ubuntu 18.10, I benchmarked the PGHI 18.10 compiler against GCC 8.2 and LLVM Clang 7.0 under a variety of C/C++ benchmarks to explore the performance of the resulting binaries. The PGI compiler also has great GPU offloading support with NVIDIA hardware, but for this initial 18.10 comparison was just exploring the CPU performance while maintaining the same CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS throughout testing.

Read more

The RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver Performance Over 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As the latest from our year-end Linux benchmarks, here are tests when seeing how Mesa's RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver performance has evolved for Linux gaming. With a Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card, the performance was looked at from Mesa 17.3 through Mesa 19.0-devel for showing the driver's evolution.

The RADV Vulkan driver continued maturing a lot this year with support for countless new features, many fixes, improved support/performance particularly for GFX9/Vega, and countless optimizations thanks to Valve's developers, Bas at Google, David at Red Hat, and the others involved in maintaining the RADV Mesa driver as an alternative to AMD's official Vulkan Linux driver options.

Read more

Graphics: ROCm 2.0 and Freedreno

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD's ROCm 2.0 Radeon Compute Stack Being Prepared For Release

    Last month AMD commented they would be releasing ROCm 2.0 prior to the end of 2018 and it looks like they will make good on their word. ROCm 2.0 is being prepared for release - source code is available albeit the reference Ubuntu/RHEL binaries are not yet out.

    We've been looking forward to ROCm 2.0 for months as it's the release of the Radeon Open Compute stack delivering full OpenCL 2.0 support.

  • Radeon ROCm 2.0 Officially Out With OpenCL 2.0 Support, TensorFlow 1.12, Vega 48-bit VA

    Just in time for Christmas, the Radeon Open Compute "ROCm" 2.0 Linux stack is now available for AMD GPU computing needs with OpenCL 2.0, TensorFlow 1.12, and more.

    AMD reached their goal of delivering the feature-packed ROCm 2.0 in 2018. Yesterday I covered the primary highlights on this big Radeon Open Compute stack update when there were signs of ROCm 2.0 being prepared for release this week. That milestone has now been officially released with ROCm 2.0 now being available, including the RHEL/CentOS and Ubuntu ROCm 2.0 binaries for easy installation.

  • Freedreno Gets Patches For A2xx NIR Backend

    Should you still be utilizing Qualcomm Adreno 200 series graphics hardware, the open-source graphics driver support is getting better for this hardware that was Adreno's first offering a programmable pipeline and clock speeds up to 133MHz.

    Recently A2xx support was added to the MSM DRM driver for using this mainline kernel driver with these Adreno 45nm OpenGL ES 2.0 GPUs. That complements the A2xx GL/GLES support within the Freedreno driver.

Graphics: RADV, Radeon, DRM "Fastboot"

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Driver Patches Revive shaderStorageImageMultisample - Useful For DXVK

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's open-source Linux graphics driver team has posted a set of patches implementing support for shaderStorageImageMultisample. These patches are based upon work started months earlier by David Airlie and important for DXVK and for other Vulkan use-cases.

    The nearly 400 lines of code enable Vulkan shaderStorageImageMultisample for Polaris GFX8 hardware and newer with this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver. The shaderStorageImageMultisample support is important for RADV since it's the only blocker remaining for the DXVK project to fully support Shader Model 5.0 in its effort of mapping Direct3D 11 features atop Vulkan.

  • Having Vega 10 Linux GPU Hangs? Try Rolling Back The Firmware

    If you recently installed the Radeon Software 18.50 Linux driver package or recently updated your system's firmware from the linux-firmware.git tree and experiencing GPU hangs with Radeon "Vega 10" graphics hardware, the firmware may be to blame.

  • Enabling Intel Fastboot Support By Default Brought Up, Again

    The Intel DRM "Fastboot" option is what allows skipping a mode-set upon the device initalization during the Linux boot process to allow for a slick and smooth Linux desktop boot experience free of any excess flickers. While Intel Fastboot has been an option for years, it isn't yet the default behavior for this graphics driver.

VirtualBox 6.0 3D/OpenGL Performance With VMSVGA Adapter

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With yesterday's release of Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0, one of the most pressing changes for Linux guests is the use of the new VMSVGA 3D graphics device emulation by default. VMSVGA is the SVGA II graphics adapter from virtualization competitor VMware, but allows for the mature SVGA Linux graphics driver stack to be used. Here are some benchmarks looking at the OpenGL performance on VirtualBox 6.0.

Read more

Core i9 7980XE vs. Threadripper 2990WX - The Pre/Post 2018 Linux Kernel Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this week I posted some benchmarks looking at the Linux kernel performance from the start to end of 2018 using an Intel Core i9 7980XE system. Here is the second part of that testing in looking at the same Linux 4.14 vs. 4.20 kernel benchmarking while putting the i9-7980XE performance side-by-side against the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX for seeing how its performance was impacted under the same kernel tests.

Using my two highest-end Intel/AMD HEDT systems, I benchmarked the Intel Core i9 7980XE and AMD Threadripper 2990WX systems using the Linux 4.14.4 kernel from the end of 2017 to that of Linux 4.20 Git for the current state of the mainline kernel performance with both systems equipped with quad channel memory, NVMe SSD storage, and focusing on I/O and system/CPU tests for this comparison.

Read more

Graphics: Android on DRM/KMS, NVIDIA's Proprietary Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A dream come true: Android is finally using DRM/KMS

    In the beginning, Android did not really have a graphics stack. It was just pushing frames directly to framebuffers and hoping for the best, the approach worked for quite some time.

    However, over time, the usecases became more and more complex and a new graphics stack was necessary. About 6 years ago the Android team conducted a lot of research and quickly realized that the mainline kernel was far from being up to the job - it was lacking Atomic screen updates, explicit syncronization and support for low power hardware, among other things. Google was left with no other choice than to design their own graphic stack: Atomic Display Framework (ADF).

  • NVIDIA 415.25 Linux Driver Released With Support For The TITAN RTX & Quadro RTX 8000

    Just days after the NVIDIA 415.23 Linux driver release that was published to fix 4.20 kernel issues, the NVIDIA 415.25 driver is now available with new product support.

    The NVIDIA 415.25 is out today in order to formally introduce support for the new TITAN RTX and Quadro RTX 8000 graphics cards, the newest Turing-based products. The TITAN RTX is available beginning today from the NVIDIA store at $2499 USD meanwhile the flagship RTX 8000 card will retail for about $10k USD.

  • NVIDIA's Proprietary Linux Driver Might Soon Work On Fedora Silverblue

    Fedora's Silverblue initiative formerly known as Fedora Atomic Workstation currently doesn't work with the NVIDIA binary driver, but that soon could change.

    For Fedora Silverblue to ultimately move forward and gain adoption, it will need to work with NVIDIA hardware and that means supporting their proprietary driver. It's simply a fact with the open-source Nouveau driver not being good enough for the vast majority of NVIDIA GPU owners and these green graphics processors being found in many Fedora Linux boxes. Due to how Fedora Silverblue is currently composed, the NVIDIA proprietary driver doesn't currently work but there are changes being worked on in order to support the binary blob's workflow.

Radeon Software 18.50 vs. Linux 4.20 + Mesa 19 Benchmarks On The AMD RX 590

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Just days after the NVIDIA 415.23 Linux driver release that was published to fix 4.20 kernel issues, the NVIDIA 415.25 driver is now available with new product support.

The NVIDIA 415.25 is out today in order to formally introduce support for the new TITAN RTX and Quadro RTX 8000 graphics cards, the newest Turing-based products. The TITAN RTX is available beginning today from the NVIDIA store at $2499 USD meanwhile the flagship RTX 8000 card will retail for about $10k USD.

Read more

Linux 4.14 vs. 4.20 Performance Benchmarks - The Kernel Speed Difference For 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As some additional end-of-year kernel benchmarking, here is a look at the Linux 4.14 versus 4.20 kernel benchmarks on the same system for seeing how the kernel performance changed over the course of 2018. Additionally, Linux 4.20 was also tested a second time when disabling the Spectre/Meltdown mitigations that added some performance overhead to the kernel this year.

On a Core i9 7980XE system, Linux 4.14.4 vs. 4.20 Git (with default Spectre/Meltdown mitigations and then again without) were benchmarked.

Read more

Five-Way Linux OS Comparison On Amazon's ARM Graviton CPU

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last month Amazon rolled out their "Graviton" ARM processors in the Elastic Compute Cloud. Those first-generation Graviton ARMv8 processors are based on the ARM Cortex-A72 cores and designed to offer better pricing than traditional x86_64 EC2 instances. However, our initial testing of the Amazon Graviton EC2 "A1" instances didn't reveal significant performance-per-dollar benefits for these new instances. In this second round of Graviton CPU benchmarking we are seeing what is the fastest of five of the leading ARM Linux distributions.

An Amazon EC2 a1.4xlarge instance with 16 cores / 32GB RAM was used for this round of benchmarking across the five most common ARM Linux distributions that were available at the time of testing on the Elastic Compute Cloud. The tests included:

Amazon Linux 2 - The reference Amazon Linux machine image with the Linux 4.14 kernel and GCC 7.3.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Parrot 4.5 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Metasploit 5.0, Drops 32-Bit Support

Parrot 4.5 is now available, powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.19 kernel series, preparing the project for the upcoming Parrot 5.0 LTS release. For future releases, Parrot Security plans to a support two kernels, stable kernel and a testing kernel. Parrot 4.5 also comes with the latest Metasploit 5.0 penetration testing framework, which introduces major features like new evasion modules, a new search engine, a json-rpc daemon, integrated web services, and support for writting shellcode in C. Read more Also: Parrot 4.5 release notes

GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS enabled

It’s happening, and it’s happening early. GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS has arrived. According to a recent report, Chromebooks with ‘Eve’ and ‘Nami’ baseboard should now, or very soon, be able to try GPU hardware acceleration. GPU acceleration allows applications to fully leverage the GPU of a device to better run graphic-intensive tasks, like gaming. The feature will make for a much smoother Linux apps experience for Chromebook users. Read more

Out-Of-The-Box 10GbE Network Benchmarks On Nine Linux Distributions Plus FreeBSD 12

Last week I started running some fresh 10GbE Linux networking performance benchmarks across a few different Linux distributions. That testing has now been extended to cover nine Linux distributions plus FreeBSD 12.0 to compare the out-of-the-box networking performance. Tested this round alongside FreeBSD 12.0 was Antergos 19.1, CentOS 7, Clear Linux, Debian 9.6, Fedora Server 29, openSUSE Leap 15.0, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.10. All of the tests were done with a Tyan S7106 1U server featuring two Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, 96GB of DDR4 system memory, and Samsung 970 EVO SSD. For the 10GbE connectivity on this server was an add-in HP NC523SFP PCIe adapter providing two 10Gb SPF+ ports using a QLogic 8214 controller. Read more