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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It

    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines.

    Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.

  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.

  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes

    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers.

    Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.

  • mesa 13.0.5

Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Ten Features You Will Not Find In The Mainline Linux 4.10 Kernel

    With last weekend mentioning ten exciting features of Linux 4.10, the tables have turned and now we are looking at ten features not found in the mainline our complete Linux 4.10 feature overview for all of the great stuff shipping in this kernel that should be out on Sunday. You may consider this article now as a bit of satire with some of these features weren't expected to appear in Linux 4.10 in the first place, but I am just mentioning several things that aren't in Linux 4.10 but some users would have found nice if they in fact happened.

  • SystemTap 3.1 has been released

    The SystemTap team has announced the 3.1 release of the tool that allows extracting performance and debugging information at runtime from the kernel as well as various user-space programs. New features include support for adding probes to Python 2 and 3 functions, Java probes now convert all parameters to strings before passing them to probes, a new @variance() statistical operator has been added, new sample scripts have been added, and more.

  • The X.Org Foundation Is Preparing For Their 2017 Elections

    This year's X.Org Foundation elections are warming up and will be getting underway shortly.

RadeonSI Mesa 17.1-dev vs. AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 OpenGL Linux Gaming

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I ran some fresh Vulkan RADV vs. AMDGPU-PRO benchmarks using the freshest AMD Linux drivers available. For getting your benchmarking fix today are some OpenGL benchmarks of RadeonSI Gallium3D on Mesa 17.1-devel plus Linux 4.10 compared to AMDGPU-PRO 16.60.

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Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • What's Still Left TODO With The Intel ANV Vulkan Driver

    With yesterday having marked one year since the release of Vulkan as well as one year since the ANV Vulkan driver code was open-sourced, here's a look at some of what's still left to be tackled by this open-source Vulkan Linux driver for HD/Iris Graphics.

  • Nouveau Changes Prepped For Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Ben Skeggs has queued up the planned open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver changes for the imminent Linux 4.11 cycle.

    He now has a linux-4.11 Git branch with the Nouveau DRM driver changes expected for this next kernel cycle.

  • A Lot Of The OpenGL Shader Cache Code Has Landed In Mesa

    Timothy Arceri, who is now working for Valve (on the open-source AMD driver stack after leaving Collabora), has landed significant portions of his work built upon others for providing an on-disk shader cache within Mesa.

A Few Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux OpenGL Benchmarks With A Core i7 7700K

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Graphics/Benchmarks

This week I've published Windows 10 vs. Linux NVIDIA gaming benchmarks and a Radeon Software Windows 10 vs. RadeonSI/RADV Linux comparison with a variety of interesting games. For this third article on the topic of Windows 10 vs. Linux performance are a few Intel HD Graphics 630 benchmark results.

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Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Linux Foundation and the National Center for Women & Information Technology Release Inclusive Speaker Orientation Course for Events
  • Automotive Grade Linux Continues Rapid Growth

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

    “We saw a 60% membership growth in 2016, and we expect that momentum to continue in 2017,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux. “Our new members represent a wide group of skills and expertise, from location-based services to digital storage, which will be valuable as we continue to enhance our UCB infotainment platform and expand into other automotive applications like telematics and instrument cluster.”

  • QXL DRM Driver Picks Up Atomic Mode-Setting Support

    Gabriel Krisman Bertazi of Collabora has published a set of 14 patches today for implementing atomic mode-setting support within the QXL DRM driver.

    The QXL DRM driver as a reminder is for Red Hat's SPICE with guest virtual machines on QEMU. QXL -- presumably with Linux 4.12 -- will join Nouveau, Intel, and other DRM drivers in supporting atomic mode-setting.

  • Intel Goes Ahead & Drops i915 Driver From OpenGL 2.1 To 1.4 By Defaultv

    Intel Linux developers have partially reverted Mesa work done years ago to drop the default OpenGL behavior with the older i915 driver from exposing OpenGL 2.0+ support to now only having OpenGL 1.4 out-of-the-box.

Linux Graphics: NVIDIA, Games, AMD, and Wayland

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

NVIDIA 378.13 Linux Driver Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA's Unix driver team is celebrating Valentine's Day by releasing their first stable driver in the 378 driver series for Linux.

Last month brought the NVIDIA 378.09 beta driver with multi-threaded GLSL shader compilation support, new Vulkan extension, Quadro M1000/M2000 support, and other changes while today's 378.13 release buttons up those beta changes.

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Also: NVIDIA Updates Legacy Drivers With X.Org Server 1.19 Support

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Almost A Decade Later, RadeonHD Stories Still Coming To Light

    This September will mark 10 years since the public launch of the RadeonHD DDX driver (xf86-video-radeonhd) that was developed by SUSE during the Radeon X1000 and HD 2000/3000 days in conjunction with ATI/AMD. While we've talked about what started AMD's open-source strategy in the past and dozens of other RadeonHD articles, new stories are still coming to light.

  • R600/RadeonSI GLSL/TGSI On-Disk Shader Cache Revised

    Last week Collabora's Timothy Arceri posted TGSI shader cache patches for Mesa that so far benefit the R600g and RadeonSI Gallium3D drivers but could also help out the other Gallium3D drivers too. The second version of those patches have now been published.

  • RADV Gets More Improvements For Mesa 17.1-dev, Lower Dota 2 CPU Usage

    While Mesa 17.0 was just released, new feature development continues building up for Mesa 17.1.

    David Airlie landed a few more RADV patches into mainline Mesa Git. One of the changes is for detecting command buffers that don't do any work and then discard them. Airlie mentioned, "If a buffer is just full of flushes we flush things on command buffer submission, so don't bother submitting these. This will reduce some CPU overhead on dota2, which submits a fair few command streams that don't end up drawing anything.

  • Mesa 17.0 Officially Released with OpenGL 4.5 Capability for Intel Haswell, More

    Today is a great day for Linux gamers as Collabora's Emil Velikov proudly announced the general availability of the Mesa 17.0.0 3D Graphics Library for all GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Yes, Mesa 17, not Mesa 14, nor 15 or 16, as the development team has decided to skip them all and jump from the Mesa 13 series straight to version 17 according to a newly adopted versioning scheme based on the current year, something that will happen at the beginning of each new year.

  • Mesa 17.0.0 has officially released and it's well worth updating

    The Mesa developers have announced the release of Mesa 17.0.0 and it's a truly incredible release. You should probably update as soon as possible.

    For those that don't know what Mesa is: you will be using Mesa if you're on Intel graphics, most likely with an AMD GPU and also some older NVIDIA models. You are not using Mesa if you install AMD/NVIDIA proprietary drivers.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

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    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.