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Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel Core i7 8700K Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

2017 has been an interesting year for processors with AMD's long awaited introduction of the Zen-based Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processors, Intel's Core X-Series processors for high-end desktops, the Xeon Scalable processor family introduction, and now the launch of Coffee Lake as a "Kaby Lake Refresh" step before the Cannonlake desktop processors expected in 2018. While another 14nm CPU, Coffee Lake is interesting is that Intel has now upped their desktop core counts in response to Ryzen. With the Core i7 series is now six cores plus Hyper Threading, compared to 4 cores plus HT with previous i7 models. The Core i5 CPUs are also now six core but sans Hyper Threading and there is also the just-published Core i5 8400 Linux benchmarks. This article serves as our first look at the Coffee Lake Core i7 CPUs in the form of the 8700K.

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Graphics: X.Org Server 1.19.4 and RADV

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Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS, openSUSE, Debian, Clear & Antergos Linux Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

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I've just wrapped up trying out nine different Linux distributions on AMD's EPYC in the form of the EPYC 7601 housed in the TYAN Transport SX TN70A-B8026. Like our initial testing with Ubuntu on EPYC, the other modern Linux distributions all played nicely with AMD's re-entry into the server market with their Zen-based offerings. But as with any new CPU platform, the out-of-the-box performance can vary greatly depending upon the Linux operating system being used. Here are benchmarks including Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS, openSUSE, Debian, Clear Linux and Antergos.

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Some Fresh Intel Core, AMD Ryzen Benchmarks On Ubuntu 17.10 + Linux 4.13

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For those wanting to see some fresh Linux CPU benchmarks with various AMD Ryzen and Intel Core processors, here are some benchmarks with Ubuntu 17.10 paired with its Linux 4.13 kernel build.

I've been working on some tests as part of a larger comparison for our upcoming Intel Coffeelake benchmarks. For those just wanting to see how various Intel/AMD CPUs are running on Ubuntu 17.10, here are those numbers. This is also with the latest BIOS on all of the motherboards, including the most updated AGESA code, for those interested in the evolving Ryzen performance.

More benchmarks and more CPU tests coming up shortly on Phoronix in our Coffeelake reviews, so just take this as a teaser or however you wish.

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Also: Considering AMD desktop card

Games and Graphics: Warhammer 40,000, Polaris, NVIDIA

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Gaming

How Ubuntu Laptop Performance Has Evolved Over Three Years From 14.10 To 17.10

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Ubuntu

With the upcoming release of Ubuntu 17.10, I was curious to see how its performance compares to that of the three-year-old Ubuntu 14.10. Here are some benchmark results showing how an Intel ultrabook/laptop performance has evolved on Linux during that time.

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Graphics: Gallium3D, OpenGL, S3TC and NVIDIA

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Mesa 17.2.2 and S3TC Support in Mesa

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  • mesa 17.2.2

    Mesa 17.2.2 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    In build and integration system, we add a dependency on libunwind when running make distcheck, as this is optional for libgallium but we want to catch any problem. As consequence, also force LLVM 3.3 in Travis when building Gallium ST Other, as this is the minimum required version we want to test. On the other hand, we link libmesautil into u_atomic_test, as this is required by platforms without particular atomic operations. In this sense, there's a patch to implement __sync_val_compare_and_swap_8, required by 32-bit PowerPC platforms. Finally, there is also a fix to build in armel devices.

  • Mesa 17.2.2 Released

    As expected, Mesa 17.2.2 was released today by Igalia's Juan Suarez Romero.

  • S3TC Support Will Land In Mesa Now That The Patent Has Expired

    As mentioned last week, the S3TC patent has now expired. With the S3 Texture Compression no longer encumbered by a patent, support for it is being added to mainline Mesa.

Our Last Time Benchmarking Ubuntu 32-bit vs. 64-bit

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Over the years we have looked at the 32-bit vs. 64-bit x86 Linux performance for curiosity sake, showing how x86_64 can be much faster than i686, and just providing these values for a reference look and if for some reason are still running 32-bit Linux software including the OS while the hardware is 64-bit capable. For this final benchmarking look are fresh numbers when doing a clean install of Ubuntu 17.10 32-bit compared to Ubuntu 17.10 64-bit.

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Graphics: Radeon, Intel, Mesa

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers