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Graphics/Benchmarks

Raspberry Pi 3 Benchmarks vs. Eight Other ARM Linux Boards

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Graphics/Benchmarks

On Friday my Raspberry Pi 3 arrived for benchmarking. For our first benchmarks of this Cortex-A53 64-bit ARM $35 development board is a comparison against eight other ARMv7 and ARMv8 development boards running their official Linux distributions while carrying out a range of benchmarks. Here are those raw performance results along with a performance-per-dollar comparison for additional insight into this low-cost ARM development board.

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Why Wayland anyway ?

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

The Fedora Workstation working group decided this week that we’re not quite there yet for making the Wayland session the default in Fedora 24.

That is a bit of a disappointment for me, since we have worked very hard this cycle to close the gaps; you can see the progress we’ve made here: primary selection, kinetic scrolling, drag-and-drop, startup notification, pointer confinement have all landed this cycle. Not to mention countless smaller bug fixes and robustness improvements. But gaps are gaps, so we will take one more cycle to address them.

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Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

GCC vs. Clang Benchmark Comparison At Varying Optimization Levels

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I posted various LLVM Clang and GCC compiler benchmarks using packages available on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and with the testing from a Xeon Skylake system. Today are some complementary tests when benchmarking GCC 5.3.1 and LLVM Clang 3.8 while testing each compiler with a variety of different optimization levels.

Rather than testing GCC vs. Clang compilers with just one set of CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS, for this comparison I tested each of these open-source compilers with a variety of different optimization levels. GCC 5.3.1 and LLVM Clang 3.8 were each tested at -O0, -O1, -O2, -O2 -march=native, -O3, -O3 -march=native, and -Ofast -march=native.

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Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • OpenSWR High Performance Software Rasterizer Lands In Mesa

    Intel's OpenSWR high-performance software rasterizer that's an alternative to LLVMpipe has landed in mainline Mesa.

    OpenSWR is a performant software rasterizer developed by Intel that in their workloads is much faster than using LLVMpipe for rendering OpenGL on x86 CPUs. If this is your first time hearing about OpenSWR, read our earlier articles on the matter: Intel Is Making A High-Performance Software Rasterizer For Mesa and OpenSWR High-Performance Software Rasterizer Revised For Mesa.

  • AMD Sends Out Big Patch Series For HSA/OpenCL Interop Support

    AMD's Marek Olšák sent out a set of 26 patches this morning for preparing the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver to have interoperability support between OpenGL and HSA/OpenCL.

  • AMD Publishes OpenVX AMDOVX Open-Source Beta

    The latest fruits of AMD's GPUOpen initiative is the open-sourcing of a beta of AMDOVX.

Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 16.04 On The Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake Workstation

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With Clear Linux continuing to outperform other Linux distributions on Intel hardware, I was curious to see how the Intel OTC Linux distribution was performing when trying it with one of the new Xeon CPUs at our disposal for testing.

For some quick Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS development benchmarks I compared some of the original benchmarks for the Xeon E3-1280 v5 to that of a fresh install of Clear Linux 6470 as the latest build of this rolling-release-like distribution at the time of testing.

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Linux 4.1 Through Linux 4.5 Kernel Benchmarks On An Intel Xeon E3 v5

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For your viewing pleasure to get our March 2016 Linux benchmarking started is a Linux 4.1 through Linux 4.5 kernel benchmark comparison when testing with a 4GHz Intel Xeon E3 v5 Skylake CPU and using a RadeonSI-supported graphics card and SSD for storage.

Used for today's kernel benchmark comparison was the new Xeon E3-1280 v5 with 3.7GHz base clock frequency and 4.0GHz turbo frequency, MSI C236A Workstation motherboard, 16GB of DDR4 system memory, 120GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD, and Radeon R7 370 graphics card. Thanks to MSI for making this motherboard and CPU testing possible.

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The Performance Impact Of Turbo Boost On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

After the tests this weekend of Intel Hyper Threading and core scaling with the new Intel Xeon E3 "Skylake" processor, I proceeded to do some Turbo Boost benchmarking.

Namely, I ran a set of open-source Linux benchmarks when the Xeon E3 1280 v5 was running in its default mode with four cores plus Hyper Threading and Intel EIST+TB enabled and then again when disabling Turbo Boost support from the BIOS. The Xeon E3 1280 v5 has a 3.7GHz base frequency and 4.0GHz boost frequency. The 80 Watt TDP processor was cooled by a Arctic Freezer i11.

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Also: GCC Optimization Level Benchmarks With A 4GHz Intel Skylake CPU On Ubuntu 64-bit

Phoronix Benchmarks and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

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More in Tux Machines

Linux on Servers

Debian, Devuan, and Ubuntu

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2016
    I handled a new LTS sponsor that wanted to see wheezy keep supporting armel and armhf. This was not part of our initial plans (set during last Debconf) and I thus mailed all teams that were impacted if we were to collectively decide that it was OK to support those architectures. While I was hoping to get a clear answer rather quickly, it turns out that we never managed to get an answer to the question from all parties. Instead the discussion drifted on the more general topic of how we handle sponsorship/funding in the LTS project.
  • Initial Planning For Ubuntu 16.10 Today At UOS
    Beyond the announcement that Ubuntu 16.10 won't ship with Mir and Unity 8 by default, many other items were discussed for the Ubuntu 16.10 release due out in October.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Isn't Going To Use Mir / Unity 8 By Default
    Well, another setback for Unity 8 and Mir. Kicking off the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10, it's been confirmed that the Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server will not be the default for the desktop spin. Similar to the current situation with existing Ubuntu releases, Unity 8 and Mir will be available as an opt-in feature for users wanting to upgrade their desktop, but Unity 7 and the faithful X.Org Server is planned to be the default for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.
  • Devuan Beta Release
    After two years in development, a beta release of the Devuan distro has made it into the world (Devuan is a registered trademark of the Dyne.org foundation). Devuan is a very Debian-ish distro. In fact, it basically is Debian, with one notable absence. Devuan doesn't use systemd. In fact, that's its main claim to fame. Devuan was created to offer an alternative to Debian fans who were alienated by the controversial switch to systemd.

Leftovers: OSS

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