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Graphics/Benchmarks

Benchmarking Amazon Linux 2 LTS Candidate 2

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Back in December Amazon rolled out Amazon Linux 2 as a big upgrade to its Linux distribution intended for the EC2 compute cloud as well as on-site via VMware/VirtualBox/Hyper-V virtualization. Amazon Linux 2 rolled out an upgraded Linux kernel, compiler, and many other packages as well as switched to using systemd. Coming out this week was Amazon Linux 2 Candidate 2 as the next installment of this long-term support Linux platform.

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Graphics: AMDVLK's XGL Vulkan API, Vulkan On GitHub, Mesa 17.3.9, Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMDVLK's XGL Code Updated With Int16 & Shader Ballot Improvements

    AMD's XGL Vulkan API layer for their "AMDVLK" driver has been updated this week with a number of enhancements.

    The latest code drop for this AMDVLK XGL code includes supporting 16-bit integers "int16" within the AMD_shader_ballot and AMD_trinary_minmax extensions. There are also pipeline improvements, AMD_shader_ballot extension enhancements, a consistent dispatch table mechanism is now used throughout the driver, and a number of other code fixes.

  • There Are Now More Than 2,000 Projects Referencing Vulkan On GitHub

    As another milestone for the Vulkan API, as of today there are more than 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub!

    It was nearly one year ago to the day (19 April) that Vulkan had 1,000 project mentions on GitHub while overnight that threshold crossed 2,000.

    Granted, the GitHub search isn't looking at projects necessarily offering a full Vulkan code implementation, but could be a Vulkan mention within code documentation saying it's coming soon, etc. But for comparison, "Direct3D 12" has just 39 hits on GitHub (or 101 for D3D12), 207 for D3D11 / 99 for Direct 3D 11, or 33,741 for OpenGL. Overall, not bad for Vulkan's continued rise and this graphics/compute API just over two years old.

  • Mesa 17.3.9 Is Coming With About Two Dozen Fixes To End Out Mesa 17.3

    Mesa 17.3.9 is expected to be released at the start of next week as the final point release for the Mesa 17.3 driver series that was introduced back in Q4'2017.

    With Mesa 18.0 now in good shape and being out for a few weeks, the Mesa 17.3 series is wrapping up. Juan Suarez Romero of Igalia who has been serving as the 17.3 series stable release manager today announced the 17.3.9 release candidate. There are currently 23 patches for this final point release, including fixes for the RADV Vulkan driver, GL/GLES version overriding fixes, GLSL patches, NIR fixes, and other minor work.

  • Libinput Getting Support For Custom Acceleration Profiles

    The latest libinput hackery being worked on by Linux input expert Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is custom profile support for pointer acceleration.

Graphics: AMD, Wayland and Khronos Group

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Spins The Radeon RX 500X Series For Laptops/Desktops

    ollowing rumors the past few days, AMD officially confirmed the Radeon RX 500X series today for desktops and notebooks, but these effectively are just re-branded GPUs for OEM builders.

  • Wayland Gets A Meson Build System Port

    Following this week's Wayland 1.15 launch, there are now patches on the floating list to add Meson build system support to Wayland-Protocols.

    For complementing Wayland' Autotools build system, longtime GNOME developer Emmanuele Bassi is proposing Meson support for Wayland, beginning with Wayland-Protocols.

  • Khronos Officially Announces Its LLVM/SPIR-V Translator

    The Khronos Group has officially announced the long-awaited open-source availability of their SPIRV-LLVM-Translator that allows the bi-directional translation of SPIR-V and LLVM IR.

NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Benchmarks, Testing Their New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday NVIDIA released their first 396 Linux driver beta in the form of the 396.18 release and its biggest addition is a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to replace the compiler that's been hobbled together since the Vulkan 1.0 debut. Here are some fresh NVIDIA Vulkan Linux benchmarks and more on this new SPIR-V compiler.

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Graphics: Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver, X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Igalia Preps 16-bit Integer Support For Intel's Vulkan Driver

    Igalia developers have been working on shaderInt16 support Intel's open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver to provide 16-bit integer support.

    The consulting firm Igalia has been tasked with getting the 16-bit integer support in Vulkan shaders ready for the Intel Vulkan Linux driver. This 16-bit int support is available for "Gen8" Broadwell graphics hardware and newer.

  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.19.99.904
  • X.Org Server 1.20 RC4 Released, EGLStreams For XWayland Might Still Land

    On Tuesday a new X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate was issued by Red Hat's Adam Jackson for this prolonged development cycle now stretching well more than one and a half years.

    This latest X.Org Server 1.20 release candidate has around three dozen fixes, mostly involving Direct Rendering Infrastructure 3 (DRI3) and GLAMOR 2D acceleration.

  • AMD Posts KFD Support For GFX9/Vega

    With the in-development Linux 4.17 kernel there is the long-awaited discrete GPU support in good shape at least for hardware like Polaris and Fiji. While the latest and greatest AMD GPUs are the Vega family, more work has been needed for AMDKFD support. Unfortunately those Vega changes didn't make it in for Linux 4.17, but those patches are now available.

Graphics: DRM and NVIDIA 396.18 (Blob) Beta

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Finally A Discussion Is Back Concerning FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR DRM Support

    While AMD has plumbed in FreeSync variable-rate refresh support with their AMDGPU DC display code stack, it's not yet all happy on the open-source mainline kernel as the missing piece has been over having a unified API for the Direct Rendering Manager drivers that can be used for supporting Free-Sync or the VESA-approved AdaptiveSync or HDMI VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). The discussion over having this common API for DRM drivers is back to being discussed.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 Linux Driver Reaches Beta With New Vulkan SPIR-V Compiler

    NVIDIA has rolled out an exciting beta Linux driver today, the first in their upcoming 396 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 396.18 Linux beta driver is now available and it's quite exciting. Exciting me the most with the NVIDIA 396 driver series is the introduction of a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. The goal of this new compiler is to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. This new SPIR-V compiler is enabled by default but for now the old compiler is still around and can be toggled with the __GL_NextGenCompiler= environment variable.

  • NVIDIA 396.18 beta driver is out with a new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler to reduce shader compilation time

    The new NVIDIA 396.18 beta is officially out and it's one of the more interesting driver releases from NVIDIA.

    The biggest thing included in the driver, is the brand new Vulkan SPIR-V compiler. NVIDIA say this will help to reduce shader compilation time and shader system memory consumption. Their older compiler will be removed in a future driver version, but if you have issues with the new one which is on by default, you can use the "__GL_NextGenCompiler=" (0 or 1) environment variable to disable it.

Mesa: NIR Compile Times and Broadcom VC5 Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NIR Compile Times Are Being Lowered Thanks To Latest Mesa Patches

    The latest driver optimization work by Timothy Arceri on Valve's Linux GPU driver team has been working on function inlining within NIR rather than within the GLSL IR optimizations. The net result is faster NIR compile times that benefit the Intel OpenGL driver and also help with RadeonSI Gallium3D.

    Arceri has been working to improve the compile times for NIR since right now with RadeonSI the compile times are slower than using the TGSI code-path. This latest patch series is a step in the right direction and it also happens to help the i965 NIR performance too.

  • Broadcom VC5 Driver Making Good Progress With Using AMDGPU's DRM Scheduler

    Last month I wrote about Broadcom's Eric Anholt exploring the use of AMDGPU's DRM scheduler within the in-development Video Core V (VC5) DRM driver. That work has panned out and looks like it will eventually work out for this open-source Broadcom graphics driver.

    Eric Anholt has spent the past two weeks wiring up the AMDGPU DRM scheduler now known as DRM_SCHED to the driver, similar to Etnaviv also now using this scheduler code that provides a serial run queue to each client and also easier support for some new features.

Graphics: Vulkan, AMD, Wayland 1.15 and Weston 4.0, NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan CTS 1.1.1 Adds 26,272 New Test Cases

    The Vulkan CTS as the conformance test suite for ensuring drivers are properly and fully implementing the Vulkan graphics and compute API continues getting even more in-depth and attempts to cover as many corner-cases as possible.

  • AMD Posts VP9 VA-API Video Acceleration For Gallium3D

    Hitting the Mesa mailing list today from AMD developers are a set of twenty-two patches providing VP9 video acceleration support via the Gallium3D VA-API state tracker.

    Before getting too excited though, this VP9 GPU-based video acceleration is just for "VCN" hardware. The only "Video Core Next" hardware out at the moment are the Raven Ridge APUs. With the next big Radeon discrete GPU launch though it should be safe to assume it will be VCN-based and thus with VP9 video support.

  • Wayland 1.15 & Weston 4.0 Officially Released

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of Wayland 1.15 and the Weston 4.0 reference compositor.

  • Mir Wayland Cut/Copy/Paste Support Being Worked On

    When it comes to Mir acting as a Wayland compositor, feature support continues to be extended for making this a more viable offering for those looking to have full Wayland support.

  • NVIDIA dropping support for 32bit Linux this month, also dropping Fermi series support

    If you're an NVIDIA user still on 32bit, you might want to think about finally updating as this month NVIDIA will be moving to only providing critical security updates for 32bit systems.

Graphics: RADV, vGPU, Libinput, Etnaviv

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • VK_AMD_shader_core_properties Now Supported By RADV

    Thanks to Samuel Pitoiset of Valve's Linux driver team, the RADV open-source Radeon Vulkan driver supports the new VK_AMD_shader_core_properties extension.

    A few days back Vulkan 1.1.72 was released and one of three new extensions was VK_AMD_shader_core_properties. This AMD shader core properties extension to Vulkan exposes physical device characteristics like the number of shader engines, SIMDs per compute unit, threads per wavefront, and other shader related hardware details.

  • Making Use Of Intel vGPU Support On Linux 4.16 & QEMU 2.12

    As of the Linux 4.16 kernel that was released one week ago, the kernel-side bits are in place for Intel Virtual GPU support and in user-space the upcoming QEMU 2.12 has the necessary code for the GTK and SPICE code-paths.

  • Libinput 1.10.4 Makes Touchpads A Bit Snappier

    Libinput 1.10.14 is now available and while it's just a point release, there is at least one change sure to catch your attention.

  • Etnaviv Performance Counter Support Merged Into Mesa 18.1

    Landing in Linux 4.15 was performance counters support in the Etnaviv DRM driver as the low-level bits for exposing the hardware counters with this reverse-engineered, open-source Vivante graphics driver. The user-space/Mesa side code has now landed too.

    With Mesa 18.1 paired with Linux 4.15 or newer will now be support for exposing the hardware performance counters for seeing more characteristics about the GPU's performance in working to optimize your game/application or the driver itself for efficient usage on Vivante GC hardware.

Graphics: Sway 1.0 Reaches Alpha, NVIDIA Preparing To Drop Fermi Support, VKVG: Vulkan Vector Graphics

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  • Sway 1.0 Reaches Alpha For This Popular Wayland Compositor

    The Sway Wayland Compositor that is known for its compatibility and inspiration from the i3 tiling window manager is nearly out with its version 1.0 release.

    Sway 1.0 Alpha was released this Saturday evening as the first step towards the big 1.0 milestone. This release is now based on the wlroots Wayland compositor library and the code-base itself to the compositor was completely overhauled. In the process, the NVIDIA proprietary driver support was also removed.

  • NVIDIA Preparing To Drop Fermi Support From Their Mainline Drivers

    NVIDIA is in the process of retiring GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" GPU support from their mainline graphics drivers on Windows and Linux/BSD/Solaris.

    Yesterday NVIDIA announced that critical security updates for Fermi series GPUs will continue through January 2019, but after that be cut off while for now they will still be issuing "Game Ready Driver" (Windows) drivers with Fermi support included.

  • VKVG: Vulkan Vector Graphics With A Cairo-Like API

    The latest nifty open-source Vulkan project we have come across worthy of a shout-out is VKVG. VKVG is short for Vulkan Vector Graphics and is a C library for drawing 2D vector graphics using the Vulkan graphics API.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

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GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers