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Graphics/Benchmarks

Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Given yesterday's story about Ubuntu 16.04 LTS potentially being the last 32-bit release if that proposal goes through, and given the number of people still running 32-bit Linux distributions on Intel/AMD hardware that is 64-bit capable, here's some fresh x86 vs. x86_64 benchmarks using Ubuntu 14.10.

Using Ubuntu 14.10 with the latest daily development ISOs today -- just ahead of this week's official Utopic Unicorn debut -- I did clean installs of both x86 and x86_64 flavors and carried out the same benchmarks with the same settings. Using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite automated benchmark framework made all testing easy and effortless.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Since last month's Linux review of the GeForce GTX 980 as NVIDIA's newest high-end GPU powered by their Maxwell architecture, many Phoronix readers have been requesting Ubuntu Linux tests of the GTX 970 too. I've now got my hands on an EVGA GeForce GTX 970 and am putting it through its paces today.

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OpenGL Preview Benchmarks For NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 970

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those anxious to see how well the GeForce GTX 970, NVIDIA's new high-end, Maxwell-based graphics card will perform under Linux, here's some preview benchmarks.

As outlined yesterday, the GTX 970 Linux benchmarking is currently happening following my GeForce GTX 980 Linux review from a few weeks ago. The GTX 970 Linux testing is going well and the full review will be published in the next few days.

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AMD's Radeon R9 285 On Linux Offers Good OpenCL Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In complementing this week's Linux review of the AMD Radeon R9 285 and follow-up articles with some extra GPU scaling tests and Catalyst AI Linux benchmarks, here's some more OpenCL R9 285 "Tonga" performance numbers under Ubuntu compared to what was shared in the original Linux review.

For those interested I ran some more OpenCL benchmarks of the Radeon R9 285 with the fglrx 14.30 series driver on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with the Linux 3.15 kernel against an assortment of other NVIDIA/AMD graphics cards as used in these recent Linux hardware reviews.

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AMD Catalyst AI Performance With "Tonga" On Ubuntu Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Along with today's R9 285 GPU scaling tests from Ubuntu, other Linux graphics tests I ran from the AMD Radeon R9 285 GCN 1.2 graphics card is a check whether to see Catalyst AI is doing much on Linux.

In the past I've found the Catalyst AI feature exposed by AMD's Catalyst Linux driver to be next to useless: AMD's Catalyst A.I. Is Good For Few Linux Games and AMD Catalyst A.I. Useless Under Linux?. But with this latest Catalyst Linux driver (fglrx 14.30 series) and newest graphics card (R9 285) I decided to run the OpenGL tests again on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

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AMD Radeon R9 285 Linux GPU Scaling Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those wondering about the maximum resolution they can run given OpenGL workloads at with the AMD Radeon R9 285 "Tonga", a new ~$250 USD graphics card, here's some Linux GPU scaling benchmarks with the Catalyst driver.

If you didn't see my review from Tuesday there's a complete review of the Radeon R9 285 Tonga under Linux as the first AMD GCN 1.2 GPU on the market using Catalyst -- since the open-source driver isn't yet compatible. Following that full 12-page review I ran some GPU scaling tests. If you're curious, here's those results.

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From The Atom 330 To Haswell ULT: Intel Linux Performance Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For the past month I've been testing out the CompuLab Intense-PC2 and it's been a terrific, small, Linux PC. The Intense-PC2 is packed with a low-power "Haswell ULT" Core i7 4600U processor and for some fresh Linux benchmarks I compared it to the former Sandy Bridge Core i7 3517UE and Intel Bay Trail Celeron N2820 NUC. For making things real interesting, I also ran some new benchmarks on an aging Intel Atom 330 system to show how the Intel low-power performance has been improving in recent years.

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Allwinner reveals new octa-core and 64-bit quad-core SoCs

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Allwinner unveiled octa-core, Cortex-A7 based “A83T” and “H8″ SoCs for tablets and media-streaming boxes, respectively, plus a quad-core, 64-bit “H64″ SoC.

Allwinner system-on-chips based on the ARM Cortex-A7, such as the dual-core A20 and quad-core A31, have become the darlings of Android- and Linux-based open source single board computer projects and media players. Now, the fast growing Chinese chipmaker is increasingly going octa-core.

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AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Performance On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Announced over the summer when AMD was celebrating their 30 years of graphics celebration was the Radeon R9 285, a $250 graphics card built on the company's latest GCN graphics processor technology to replace the Radeon R9 280. We finally have our hands on a Radeon R9 285 "Tonga" for delivering the first look at its Linux performance.

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AMD's New Open-Source "AMDGPU" Linux Driver Supports The R9 285 Tonga

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The Radeon R9 285 "Tonga" graphics card is the first GCN 1.2 GPU and was launched last month. Right now I happen to be working on a Linux review of the R9 285 with Catalyst. It turns out though that there isn't open-source driver support for the R9 285 in the current open-source Radeon driver. Rather, AMD is using this GCN 1.2 GPU as the starting point for the new AMDGPU Linux driver stack.

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