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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux/Kernel News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Torvalds: "I'm still working on" year of the Linux desktop, "I'll wear them down"

    The phrase "year of the Linux desktop" has been uttered for so many years that for some it has lost all meaning. But the creator of the Linux operating system hasn't given up on that dream. And he's right not to give up.

  • Live Kernel Patching Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

    Live kernel patching was accepted into the Linux kernel in v4.0 in February 2015, so we can declare the 2014 LPC Live Kernel Patching Microconference to have been a roaring success! However, as was noted at the time, this is just the beginning of the real work. In short, the v4.0 work makes live kernel patching possible, but more work is required to make it more reliable and more routine.

    Additional issues include stacktrace reliability, patch-safety criteria for kernel threads, thread consistency models, porting to non-x86 architectures, handling of loadable modules, compiler optimizations, userspace tooling, patching of data, automated regression testing, and patch-creation guidelines.

  • Linux-Stable-Security Kernel Tree Announced

    Sasha Levin of Oracle has announced the formation of the Linux-Stable Security Tree.

    This new tree will be based off the mainline Linux stable tree but focus on just carrying fixes for security vulnerabilities. Other changes normally found in stable Linux point releases wouldn't be integrated.

  • Intel Has New DRM Linux Driver Code Ready For Testing: More Atomic Goodness

    Daniel Vetter of Intel OTC has sent out an announcement about another round of i915 DRM kernel driver code that's ready for testing by developers and the community.

    The latest drm-intel-testing work continues with more atomic-related driver work. One of the more prominent atomic changes in this latest Git branch is making the Intel color manager support fully atomic. Some race conditions were also fixed up in their driver, many small improvements to the GEM memory management code, GuC firmware loading fixes, PLL clean-ups for Cherryview and Valleyview, reworked DisplayPort detection, and various other improvements.

  • Dell XPS 15 Skylake Linux Benchmarks
  • The Performance Of Ubuntu Software Running On Windows 10 With The New Linux Subsystem

Benchmarking/Profiling and Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

GNU/Games: Linux vs Windows Benchmarks

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GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming

Some Early Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Vulkan Tests With NVIDIA Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Microsoft

For this early comparison were the recent results I did of OpenGL and Vulkan on Ubuntu using The Talos Principle. Those tests were two weeks ago with the NVIDIA 364.12 driver on Ubuntu 16.04 with the Linux 4.4 kernel. The system used for this old and new testing was the same Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake box with MSI C236A Workstation motherboard, 16GB of DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 120GB Samsung 850 SSD. With today's Windows 10 Pro x64 tests, the NVIDIA 364.72 driver was at play.

[...]

With regard to the Vulkan performance between Windwos 10 and Ubuntu 16.04, while both were using the NVIDIA 364 series driver, the Linux results on all three graphics cards were noticeably faster! Quite interesting considering that usually the NVIDIA graphics performance is close to each other under Windows and Linux, at least from past OpenGL comparisons. But again, this was just some very initial testing done today.

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Also: Vulkan 1.0.9 Specification Released

Early Radeon Vulkan Windows vs. AMDGPU PRO Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

On Friday I posted Some Early Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Vulkan Tests With NVIDIA Graphics while today the tables have turned to show The Talos Principle on Windows 10 and Ubuntu 16.04 Linux under AMD Radeon graphics.

The same system was used as the tests on Friday (Intel Xeon E3-1280 v5 Skylake box with MSI C236A Workstation motherboard, 16GB of DDR4-2133MHz memory, and 120GB Samsung 850 SSD). Radeon Software Crimson Edition 16.4.1 was in use on the Windows side while the inaugural AMD GPU-PRO stack with Vulkan support was at play on Ubuntu 16.04 x86_64.

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Graphics and Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

libinput News

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Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Why libinput doesn't have a lot of config options

    Most days, at least one of the bugs I deal with requests something along the lines of "just add $FOO as a config option". In this post, I'll explain why this is usually a bad solution. First, read http://www.islinuxaboutchoice.com/ and keep those arguments in mind. Generally, there are two groups of configuration options - hardware options and user options. Hardware options are those that deal with specific quirks needed on some hardware, but not on other hardware. User options are those that deal with user preferences such as tapping or two-finger vs. edge scrolling.

  • Libinput Adds A Touchpad Software Middle Button

    Red Hat's Peter Hutterer explained in a blog post, "I just pushed a patch to libinput master to enable a middle button on the clickpad software buttons. Until now, our stance was that clickpads only get a left and right software button, split at the 50% mark. The reasoning is simple: touchpads only have markings for left and right buttons (if any!) and the middle button's extents are not easily discoverable if there is no visual or haptic feedback...So the patch I just pushed out to master enables a middle software button between the left and the right button. The exact width of the button scales with the touchpad but it's usually around 20-25mm and it's centered on the touchpad so despite the lack of visual or haptic guides it should be reliable to hit. The new behaviour is hard-coded and for now middle button emulation continues to work on touchpads."

  • libinput now has a touchpad software middle button

Fedora 23/24 vs. Debian vs. Ubuntu 16.04 vs. CentOS 7 vs. Clear Linux Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For some extra benchmarks to toss out there tonight are some tests of Fedora 23 and Fedora 24 Alpha (while acknowledging it's still early in development and debug mode) compared to Debian testing, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS in its current development form, Intel Clear Linux, and CentOS 7.

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