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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics: Vulkan CoC, Mesa Release, and Wayland/Weston News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Vulkan Adopts A Code Of Conduct [Ed: New way for Khronos Group to control the private lives of developers and get rid of people whom it doesn't like for nontechnical reasons]

    The latest open-source project now officially adopting a Code of Conduct is Vulkan.

    Added today to the Vulkan documentation repository is a Code of Conduct file for Vulkan.

    That Code of Conduct is referencing the main Khronos Group Contributor Code of Conduct.

  • mesa 18.1.9

    Hi List,

    Due to me just forgetting to send out the release on Friday Confused, it's one work day late. Mesa 18.1.9 is now available for general consumption, it is the last release in the 18.1.x series, consider upgrading to 18.2.x for further updates.

    This has been another busy cycle, with roughly 35 real patches (excluding maintainer patches). We've seen long standing bugs in util code fixed, patches to anv and radv, as well as fixes to the android build system, and a few patches here and there across the rest of the code.

    Now that 18.1.x is all wrapped up, I'd like to say I've appreciated working with y'all as the maintainer for this cycle, thank you for your patience as I tried to get the process figured out.

    Dylan

  • Mesa 18.1.9 Released As The Last Of The Series

    Mesa 18.1.9 is now available as the last planned point release of last quarter's release stream.

    With Mesa 18.2.1 having been released, users are encouraged to upgrade to the stable Mesa 18.2 series. But if you're holding off on upgrading for one reason or another, Mesa 18.1.9 is one last push for bug fixes.

  • Wayland's Weston Will Now Respect Your VR HMD

    Wayland's Weston compositor will no longer try to takeover your virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display.

    As was the case too with the X.Org Server up until some months back, Wayland's Weston compositor currently would try to take over VR HMDs like the HTC Vive as just another monitor output... But thanks to the work led by Keith Packard under contract for Valve to improve the X.Org and DRM components for better SteamVR handling on Linux, there is now the non-desktop bit plumbed through the Linux kernel's DRM infrastructure so VR HMDs will be treated as non-desktop display outputs. So user-space finally can know if a display output isn't intended as just another desktop display but for a special use-case like virtual reality.

Ubuntu 18.10 Performance Is Looking Up, But Clear Linux Still Leads In Many Tests

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With less than one month until Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" releases, I have begun my usual benchmarking dance in checking out how the Ubuntu performance is looking to its current release, in this case the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver". Our first performance look at Ubuntu 18.10 is with a mix of seven Intel and AMD desktop systems while using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with all updates, Ubuntu 18.10 in its current near-final form, and using Intel's Clear Linux as a gold standard reference with it generally offering the leading out-of-the-box Linux x86_64 performance of major distributions.

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Also: Ethereum Crypto Mining Performance Benchmarks On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Folding@Home Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is Folding@Home.

Folding@Home was accidentally left out of yesterday's RTX 2080 Ti CUDA/OpenCL comparison with simply forgetting to add the FAHBench test profile to the run queue. But as there is often interest in seeing the FAHBench performance on new GPUs by at least a few of the premium enablers, I ran some extra tests just looking at the Folding@Home performance and here are those results today.

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Graphics: AMDGPU, SVGA and Sway/Wayland

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • In-Progress AMDGPU Updates For Linux 4.20~5.0 Have DC Update, New Polaris ID

    -
    Last week AMD sent in their big feature pull request of AMDGPU driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.20 (or what will likely be Linux 5.0) and since then more changes have been queuing in their work-in-progress branch.

    That last pull request was a big one with AMD Raven2 support, AMD Picasso APU enablement, more Vega 20 upbringing work including initial xGMI support, AMDKFD merging into AMDGPU, VCN JPEG engine support, GPUVM virtual memory improvements, and various other changes as outlined in the aforelinked article.

  • VMware's SVGA Gallium3D Driver Enables OpenGL 3.3 Compatibility Profile Support

    In preparation for the upcoming VMware Fusion 11 and VMware Workstation 15 releases, their Mesa/Gallium3D-based driver stack for Linux guest GPU acceleration has been seeing a variety of updates.

    Earlier this month was a big code push including many new features to its "SVGA" Gallium3D driver like MSAA, a various assortment of new OpenGL extensions, and other changes in step with their latest "VMWGFX" Linux kernel DRM drivers.

  • Sway 1.0 Alpha 6 Released, Now Supports Moving/Resizing Tiled Windows With The Mouse

    Released on Friday was the sixth alpha release of the upcoming Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor release that still strives for compatibility with the i3 window manager workflow.

    Sway 1.0 has already added a ton of new functionality like using the new wlroots Wayland library, output rotation, fractional scaling, daisy-changed DisplayPort monitors, better HiDPI support, DMA-BUF additions for screenshot capture and real-time video capturing, atomic additions, floating window improvements, better multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol support, and a heck of a lot more.

Mesa Can Finally Build With Almost No Compiler Warnings

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Quite a feat for modern open-source projects with large C/C++ code-bases developed over the years, Mesa3D can almost be compiled now without any warnings -- there's just one remaining.

When paired with the latest GCC 8 stable compiler, Mesa paired with some pending patches is down to just one compiler warning left in the build process -- quite an improvement compared to in the past with older versions of GCC and Mesa.

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Linux Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA, Mesa, and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Preparing A Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.20~5.0

    Intel open-source developers have already sent in multiple pull requests of feature work to DRM-Next that in turn will be pulled into the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel merge window and they have one final batch of feature changes on the way.

    The cut-off is quickly approaching for new feature work slated for this next kernel cycle (Linux 4.20, or renamed to Linux 5.0 if Linus Torvalds sticks to his usual versioning preference) and Intel has announced a batch of changes ready for testing ahead of issuing it as a pull request to DRM-Next.

  • NVIDIA Sends Out DRM Display Patches For Tegra's Xavier SoC

    Going back to the beginning of the year NVIDIA developers have been contributing "Tegra194" enablement to the upstream Linux kernel. They've now moved on to contributing T194 support to the Tegra Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for display support on this SoC that's better known as Xavier.

    The Tegra194 / Xavier is NVIDIA's latest SoC with the eight Carmel ARMv8 cores and Volta-based GPU. The NVIDIA Xavier Developer Kits have begun shipping and now with all of the other necessary hardware enablement bits upstream or on their way to mainline, the latest patches being published are for the display support with the Tegra DRM driver.

  • More Linux Tests & Driver Observations With The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Here are some additional notes to complement my GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux review from yesterday now that I've had more time with this card and a working Linux driver.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Is Coming This Week With Dozens Of Fixes

    As the first stable point release to the newly-christened Mesa 18.2, the Mesa 18.2.1 release is going to be a big one.

    The release candidate to Mesa 18.2.1 was issued on Wednesday and has nearly 60 patches over the recent 18.2.0 stable release. This includes Vulkan header updates for v1.1.84 and many RADV / ANV Vulkan driver fixes ranging from CTS issues to hangs to other fixes.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Released With A Number Of Fixes For The Vulkan Drivers

    Mesa 18.2.1 is out this morning as the first stable point release to the recently introduced Mesa 18.2 series. Mesa 18.2.1 marks the point at which it should be relatively safe for stable-minded users to switch over to this quarterly release stream.

    Given it's the first point release after a very active development cycle, there are a lot of fixes: around five dozen changes are making up today's release coming two weeks after v18.2.0.

  • AMD Adds A Seemingly New Polaris ID To Their Linux Driver

    It looks like another re-branded AMD Polaris graphics card might be on the way given the latest AMDGPU Linux kernel patch.

    Either there's a new AMD Radeon "Polaris" graphics card coming, some new modem for OEMs, or just very tardy maintenance in adding the necessary PCI ID for an existing Polaris graphics card revision... But two years after Polaris RX 400 cards first debuted (and a year and a half since the RX 500 series), there is now a new Polaris PCI ID being added to the AMD Linux graphics driver.

Mir Release 1.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • IoT Graphics: Mir Release 1.0

    The Mir team is pleased to announce the milestone release of Mir 1.0.0. This is the first major release targeted at IoT device makers and enthusiasts looking to build the next-generation of graphical solutions.

  • Mir 1.0 Released For "Next-Generation of Graphical Solutions"

    As we were expecting over the last few days, the long-awaited release of Mir 1.0 is now available. It's certainly a different beast now than when "Mir 1.0" was talked about in the past now that it's focused on providing Wayland support.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Shows Very Strong Compute Performance Potential

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Besides the new GeForce RTX 2080 series being attractive for developers wanting to make use of new technologies like RTX/ray-tracing, mesh shaders, and DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling), CUDA and OpenCL benchmarking so far on the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is yielding impressive performance -- even outside of the obvious AI / deep learning potential workloads with the Turing tensor cores. Here are some benchmarks looking at the OpenCL/CUDA performance on the high-end Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing cards as well as an AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 for reference. System power consumption, performance-per-Watt, and performance-per-dollar metrics also round out this latest Ubuntu Linux GPU compute comparison.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 To RTX 2080 Ti Graphics/Compute Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday were the initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux benchmarks based upon my early testing of this high-end Turing graphics card paired with their new 410 Linux graphics driver. For your viewing pleasure today is a look at how the RTX 2080 Ti compares to the top-end cards going back to Kepler... Or, simply put, it's the GeForce GTX 680 vs. GTX 780 Ti vs. 980 Ti vs. 1080 Ti vs. 2080 Ti comparison with OpenGL and Vulkan graphics tests as well as some initial OpenCL / CUDA tests but more Turing GPU compute tests are currently being conducted. For making this historical comparison more interesting are also power consumption and performance-per-Watt metrics.

With the Linux support on the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti fairing well, one of the curiosity-driven tests was this comparison featuring the "[x]x80" series cards of Kepler, Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing for an interesting benchmarking look at the NVIDIA graphics/compute speed going back to the GTX 680 debut in 2012. The GTX 680, GTX 780 Ti, GTX 980 Ti, GTX 1080 Ti, and RTX 2080 Ti were all tested using this newest Linux driver release, 410.57 beta, while running on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS box with the Linux 4.18 kernel.

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Nouveau and NVIDIA News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Developers Begin Reverse-Engineering NVIDIA Turing Driver Support

    The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics cards are only officially beginning to ship today, but at least one independent Nouveau developer already has his hands on the hardware and beginning to work on the clean-room, driver reverse-engineering process in order to eventually get open-source "Nouveau" driver support working.

  • NVIDIA CUDA 10 Officially Released With Turing Support, nvJPEG, CUDA-Vulkan

    Coinciding with the debut of the GeForce RTX 2080 series line-up is now the official release of CUDA 10.0.

    CUDA 10.0.130 is now official after being announced back at SIGGRAPH. This NVIDIA compute architecture update provides Turing GPU support and its Tensor Cores, NVSwitch Fabric support, nvJPEG as a new library for JPEG processing, various performance tuning for its expansive library set, a new async task-graph programming model, interoperability improvements with Vulkan and D3D12, and new developer tools.

  • NVIDIA have released the 410.57 driver as well as a 396.54.06 Vulkan beta driver to help DXVK

    Along with the release of the GeForce RTX 2080 GPU series NVIDIA have put out a new 410.57 driver to support it. Additionally, there's a new Vulkan beta driver which should help DXVK.

  • Help Test Intel+Nvidia Hybrid Graphics GDM3 Fixes In Ubuntu 18.04

    Ubuntu 18.04 shipped with two issues for Intel+Nvidia hybrid graphics users: an increase in power consumption when the discrete GPU is off, and the inability to switch between power profiles with a simple logout (a restart is currently required).

    These issues are caused by changes in logind, Nvidia drivers packaging (which is now more granular), and the migration from LightDM to GDM3, and they were fixed in Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish.

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Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

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today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

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    For many years we have run these lists dedicated to developing and promoting Samba, without any set of clear guidelines for people to know what to expect when participating.  What do we require? What kind of behavior is encouraged?
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    Learning Machine is making changes to its Blockcerts Credential Issuer, Verifier and Wallet to enable native support for records issuance and verification using any blockchain. Blockcerts was launched by Learning Machine and MIT Media Lab in 2016 as new way to allow students to receive digital diplomas through an app, complementing a traditional paper degree. Blockcerts was originally designed to be blockchain-agnostic, which means that open standards can be used to anchor records in any blockchain. The Blockcerts Universal Identifier recognizes which blockchain is being used and verifies accordingly. Currently, the open source project has added support for bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains, but anyone can add support through the project's GitHub page.
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  • On the low adoption of automated testing in FOSS
    A few times in the recent past I've been in the unfortunate position of using a prominent Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) program or library, and running into issues of such fundamental nature that made me wonder how those issues even made it into a release. In all cases, the answer came quickly when I realized that, invariably, the project involved either didn't have a test suite, or, if it did have one, it was not adequately comprehensive. I am using the term comprehensive in a very practical, non extreme way. I understand that it's often not feasible to test every possible scenario and interaction, but, at the very least, a decent test suite should ensure that under typical circumstances the code delivers all the functionality it promises to. [...] Most FOSS projects, at least those not supported by some commercial entity, don't come with any warranty; it's even stated in the various licenses! The lack of any formal obligations makes it relatively inexpensive, both in terms of time and money, to have the occasional bug in the codebase. This means that there are fewer incentives for the developer to spend extra resources to try to safeguard against bugs. When bugs come up, the developers can decide at their own leisure if and when to fix them and when to release the fixed version. Easy! At first sight, this may seem like a reasonably pragmatic attitude to have. After all, if fixing bugs is so cheap, is it worth spending extra resources trying to prevent them?
  •  
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