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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA OpenCL Benchmarks 6-Way With The 396.45 Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks

It's been a while since last delivering any benchmarks focused on the NVIDIA OpenCL compute performance, but for those curious, here are some fresh GPGPU performance numbers using the latest NVIDIA Linux driver release while testing from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Tested for this brief NVIDIA OpenCL performance update were the GeForce GTX 1050, GTX 1050 Ti, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, GTX 1070 Ti, and GTX 1080 Ti.

Tests were done from an Intel Core i7 8086K box running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the Linux 4.17 kernel. The NVIDIA binary driver remains officially at OpenCL 1.2 but with support for some OpenCL 2 capabilities.

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GCC 8/9 vs. LLVM Clang 6/7 Compiler Benchmarks On AMD EPYC

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following the GCC 9.0 benchmarks earlier this week I ran some tests seeing how the GCC 8 stable compiler and GCC 9 development state compare to the LLVM Clang 6.0.1 stable compiler and LLVM Clang 7.0 development. Here are those benchmarks using the AMD EPYC 7601 32-core / 64-thread processor.

Up for benchmarking in this Linux C/C++ compiler comparison were GCC 8.2 RC1, GCC 9.0.0 SVN as of 20 July, LLVM Clang 6.0.1 stable, and LLVM Clang 7.0 SVN as of 22 July. With each of these compilers, they were tested when setting the CFLAGS/CXXFLAGS to -O2, -O3, and -O3 -march=native for a variety of common optimization levels.

The test system for the duration of the comparison was the AMD EPYC 7601 "Zen" server processor within a Tyan 2U platform and running an Ubuntu 18.10 development snapshot with the Linux 4.16 kernel.

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20-Way NVIDIA/AMD Vulkan Linux Gaming Performance Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

For those curious about the current performance state for the recent wave of Vulkan-powered Linux games, which so far are primarily Linux game ports from Feral Interactive, aside from Valve's Dota 2 and Croteam's games, here are some fresh benchmarks using twenty different graphics cards on the latest drivers.

The AMD Radeon graphics card testing was using Mesa 18.2-devel via the Oibaf PPA as of 22 July. The Linux 4.17.8 kernel was in use for the latest stable AMDGPU DRM driver support. The Radeon graphics cards tested -- based upon what I had available -- were the Radeon HD 7950, R7 260X, R9 285, R9 290, RX 560, RX 580, R9 Fury, RX Vega 56, and RX Vega 64. Note that with the GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics cards they were booted with the AMDGPU DRM driver support being enabled in order to attain RADV Vulkan driver compatibility.

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Kernel and Graphics: PECI, AMDVLK, Vulkan and Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Continues Prepping PECI Support For The Linux Kernel

    PECI is a new one-wire bus interface being developed at Intel for communication between Intel CPUs and chipset components to external monitoring/control devices. The Linux support for this Platform Environment Control Interface continues to be worked out by Intel's open-source Linux kernel developers.

  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Stack Updated With Fixes

    Less than one full week after their previous code drop, the AMD developers maintaining the AMDVLK Vulkan Linux driver today pushed out their freshest code.

  • Frame Timing & Fixing Game Stuttering With Display Timing Extensions

    Back during GDC 2018, Alen Ladavac serving as the CTO of Croteam presented on their research and testing into frame timing for helping uncover why some games are stuttering even when being rendered at high frame-rates. The short story is the issue can be addressed by just not measuring the time for rendering each frame in a game but to measure the time needed to actually present that frame on a display output. For that there is VK_GOOGLE_display_timing for Vulkan and other similar extensions.

  • The Elusive Frame Timing

    Your pre-order has finally unlocked and has just finished installing. Nervously, you are starting it for the first time. So far, so good — the game is running at 60 frames per second. Or at least the frame counter from the latest GPU tuner overlay says so. But, something is not right. You flick your mouse around in sharp, deliberate movements. You side-strafe left and right quickly… and… It stutters! IT FRIGGIN’ STUTTERS! Argh, how can it be? How can it stutter at 60 frames-per-bloody-second?

  • Mesa 18.2 Is On The Final Days Of Development With Many New Features Coming

    Mesa 18.2 is going to be branched at the end of the month to mark the end of feature development for this quarterly Mesa feature release. This is a few weeks later than originally scheduled and has allowed for some extra features to land. Here is a look at some of the Mesa 18.2 changes on the way.

A Look At The Linux vs. Windows Power Use For A Ryzen 7 + Radeon RX Vega Desktop

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I have been posting a number of Linux laptop battery benchmarks including how the power consumption compares to Windows 10. If you are curious how these numbers play out on the desktop side and when using AMD hardware, here are some results for your viewing pleasure with a Ryzen 7 2700X and Radeon RX Vega 64 desktop system.

While working on some recent Windows/Linux benchmarks from the AMD side given the number of recent Intel operating system benchmarks, I took the opportunity to also run some fresh power consumption tests. The system under test was an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X with an ASUS ROG CROSHAIR VII HERO motherboard, 2 x 8GB DDR4-3400 memory, 256GB Samsung 950 PRO 256GB NVMe SSD, and Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics.

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32-Bit Linux Prepares For Performance Hit Due To KPTI For Meltdown Mitigation

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since January there has been KPTI in the x86_64 Linux kernel as Kernel-based Page Table Isolation for mitigating the Meltdown CPU vulnerability. On the back-burner since then has been KPTI support for the Linux x86 32-bit kernel to protect those using older 32-bit-only processors. With the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel, KPTI is landing for Linux x86 32-bit. Here are sone benchmarks showing the performance penalty when upgrading to this new kernel on an Ubuntu i686 laptop.

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Graphics and Kernel: Latest

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Graphics/Benchmarks

OpenGL Graphics on Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

An Early Look At The GCC 9.0 Performance On AMD EPYC

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Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

While GCC 9 has just been under development for a relatively short period of time, here are our initial benchmarks of GCC 9.0 SVN on and AMD EPYC server compared to the GCC 8.2 stable release candidate when tested at various optimization levels as well as PGO (Profile Guided Optimizations).

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Graphics: Radeon/AMDGPU, Vulkan and The Khronos Group

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon/AMDGPU DRM Drivers Get HD Audio Component Support

    If there is one part of the Radeon/AMDGPU open-source graphics driver stack that feels like it's been somewhat neglected over time has been the HDMI/DP audio support. Fortunately, another improvement is on the way for bettering it.

    The AMDGPU audio issues have ranged from having to wait a long time on some GPUs for having HDMI/DP audio support that works due to being held up by the AMDGPU Display Code (DC / formerly DAL) to be merged into the kernel, various audio formats not being supported, and bugs seeming more prevalent than other areas of the driver stack. Fortunately, SUSE's Takashi Iwai who is also the maintainer of the sound subsystem in the mainline kernel has volleyed a set of new Radeon/AMDGPU DRM patches today.

  • Vulkan 1.1.81 Released, Deprecates VK_NV_glsl_shader

    Vulkan 1.1.81 is now available as the latest minor update for this graphics/compute API.

    Vulkan 1.1.81 doesn't change much but mostly boils down to small documentation clarifications and corrections. There are a few fixes in the specification and some minor adjustments but nothing really notable nor very different from recent revisions.

  • Magic Leap Joins The Khronos Group

    The latest company joining The Khronos Group to promote cross-platform industry APIs is Magic Leap.

    Magic Leap is the company that has already raised more than $1.4 billion USD from the likes of Google, AT&T, and Alibaba for their head-mounted virtual retinal display. Their technology is really slick and has been in development now for eight years.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Intel and AMD Developments

  • Intel Has Quietly Been Working On A New Gallium3D Driver Being Called "Iris"
    After resisting Gallium3D for the past decade with a preference on continuing to maintain their "i965" Mesa classic driver and all they've invested into its compiler stack and more, it seems times are changing as the open-source Intel team has been starting up development of a modern Gallium3D driver. This is not to be confused with the former i915g or i965g efforts from about a decade ago that were the experiments of Tungsten/LunarG for driver research/experimentation purposes or in the case of i915g to handle some features with LLVM in software, but this is a modern Gallium3D driver targeting their current hardware.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Linux Graphics Driver Released with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and RHEL / CentOS Support
    The long awaited AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 driver update for the AMD Linux graphics driver package has finally been released, with a driver installation option for both “all open” and closed / proprietary driver modules. What is great about this driver package update is that it is supported on the latest Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS as well as Ubuntu 16.04.5, and RHEL / CentOS 6.10 and 7.5 respectively for their Enterprise Linux support targets.
  • AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 Released With Ubuntu 18.04.1 Support & WattMan-Like Functionality
    AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 is now available as the long desired update to this official AMD Linux graphics driver package that consists of the driver installation option for both the "all-open" and closed/proprietary driver modules. Notable to the AMDGPU-PRO 18.30 release is that Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS is now supported as well as Ubuntu 16.04.5. Additionally, RHEL/CentOS 6.10 and 7.5 release series round out their enterprise Linux support targets.

Wine 3.14 Released

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 3.14 is now available.
  • Wine 3.14 Adds DXTn Texture Decompression, Other Improvements
    Due to the summer holidays it's been four weeks since Wine 3.13 but it has now been succeeded by Wine 3.14 as the newest feature release. Wine 3.14 adds support for DXTn texture decompression, deferral support for MSI install actions, Japanese keyboard support within DirectInput, improvements to the standard task dialog, more Shell32 icons, and a total of 36 bug fixes. Those bug fixes range from Adobe CS4 issues to problems with Wargaming, Chromium, Guild Wars, Civilization V, Chaos League, and other software.
  • Grab a glass as Wine 3.14 is out today with DXTn texture decompression support and plenty of fixes
    The latest and greatest in fine Wine [Official Site] is out today with Wine 3.14 filled with features and the usual bug fixes including support for DXTn texture decompression

Android Leftovers

Zephyr Project Embraces RISC-V with New Members and Expanded Board Support

The Linux Foundation’s Zephyr Project, which is developing the open source Zephyr real-time operating system (RTOS) for microcontrollers, announced six new members, including RISC-V members Antmicro and SiFive. The project also announced expanded support for developer boards. Zephyr is now certified to run 100 boards spanning ARM, x86, ARC, NIOS II, XTENSA, and RISCV32 architectures. Antmicro, SiFive, and DeviceTone, which makes IoT-savvy smart clients, have signed up as Silver members, joining Oticon, runtime.io, Synopsys, and Texas Instruments. The other three new members -- Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, The Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS), and Northeastern University – have joined the Vancouver Hack Space as Associate members. Read more