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Graphics/Benchmarks

The Intel Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 3.20

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As usual, the next version of the Linux kernel will bring a number of prominent changes to Intel's open-source DRM graphics driver.

For those that haven't yet caught up with their Phoronix reading with my dozens of Linux 3.20 articles already, including my always close look at the DRM driver changes, Daniel Vetter of Intel has written a new blog post about the Linux 3.20 changes for Intel. Daniel explains the changes at length and are easy to grasp for casual readers.

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Google Launches Open-Source, Cross-Cloud Benchmarking Tool

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Google
OSS

Google today launched PerfKit, an open-source cloud-benchmarking tool that, in Google’s words, is an “effort to define a canonical set of benchmarks to measure and compare cloud offerings.” The PerfKit tools currently support Google’s own Compute Engine, Amazon’s AWS and Microsoft’s Azure clouds. Google says it has worked on this project with over 30 researchers, companies and customers, including ARM, Canonical, Cisco, Intel, Microsoft, Rackspace and Red Hat.

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Linux 3.19 File-System Tests Of EXT4, Btrfs, XFS & F2FS

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Graphics/Benchmarks

If you're wondering about any file-system performance changes for XFS/EXT4/Btrfs/F2FS when operating on a single SSD, I ran the vanilla Linux 3.18 vs. 3.19 benchmarks this weekend on an ASUS Zenbook UX301LAA with Intel Core i7 4558U Haswell processor and the file-system tests targeting the secondary 128GB SanDisk SATA3 SSD with this ultrabook. A development snapshot of Ubuntu 15.04 x86_64 was used for this kernel/file-system comparison with its updated file-system user-space utilities. For this testing, the stock mount options of each file-system was used.

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9-Way Linux Laptop Performance Comparison From Intel Nehalem To Broadwell

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As the latest Linux benchmark numbers to deliver for Intel Broadwell and the new ThinkPad X1 Carbon ultrabook, here's a nine-way Linux laptop/ultrabook comparison. All nine devices in this article were tested against the latest snapshot of Ubuntu 15.04 while running a big set of benchmarks and also monitoring the CPU temperatures and battery power consumption while testing for a nice look at Clarksfield/Nehalem, Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, and Broadwell mobile hardware on Linux.

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Mesa 10.4.4 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While all exciting work going into Mesa Git is for Mesa 10.5, Mesa 10.4.4 is out for stable users sticking to tagged releases. Mesa 10.4.4 fixes just a handful of bugs rangingg from core Mesa to the i965 driver and DRI3.

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X.Org Server 1.17 Officially Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Keith Packard took a break from his new job at Hewlett Packard working on Linux support for "The Machine" to put out the official release of X.Org Server 1.17.

X.Org Server 1.17.0 was released a few minutes ago and is codenamed Côte de veau. This is a half-year update to the X.Org Server and features integration of the xf86-video-modesetting DDX driver, much improved GLAMOR support, and other improvements.

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Wayland's Weston Now Supports Maximizing XWayland Windows

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A change accepted into Wayland's Weston compositor codebase on Monday allows for maximizing XWayland windows.

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Ubuntu vs. Fedora vs. openSUSE With An Intel Broadwell Ultrabook

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The latest Linux benchmarks I have to share from the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon with Intel Broadwell processor are some openSUSE Tumbleweed tests with the results compared to Fedora 21 and Ubuntu 14.10/15.04.

One of the requested test distributions for the third-generation X1 Carbon from Phoronix readers was to see how this new, high-end ultrabook would play with openSUSE. The short story is that with openSUSE Tumblewed the level of support matched that of Fedora 21 and Ubuntu 14.10/15.04 -- it's not much of a surprise really given that Tumbleweed is using the Linux 3.18 kernel, Mesa 10.4.2, etc.

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Ubuntu vs. Fedora Linux On Lenovo's X1 Carbon With Core i7 Broadwell

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat
Ubuntu

The latest distribution I tried on the X1 Carbon (and the OS I'll ultimately use for running the X1 Carbon in a production capacity as my main system) is Fedora 21. Fedora 21 booted up on the X1 Carbon wonderfully without any issues aside from the trackpoint button clicks being wonky (though the button clicks in the corner of the trackpad works fine). Fedora 21 with Wayland also ran fine on this system with Intel HD Graphics 5500. Overall, it was a pleasant experience without any major problems.

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Intel Broadwell: GCC 4.9 vs. LLVM Clang 3.5 Compiler Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

GCC 4.9.2 and LLVM Clang 3.5.0 were benchmarked using the packages provided on Fedora 21 x86_64. The same Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon was used for all of the benchmarks, the first Broadwell laptop/ultrabook at Phoronix and it features the Core i7 5600U that's dual-core with Hyper Threading and tops out at 3.20GHz. Fedora 21 was running with the Linux 3.17.8 kernel while testing each of the provided compilers.

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More in Tux Machines

World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

Variscite unveiled a 50 x 20mm “DART-MX6″ module that runs Linux or Android on the Freescale i.MX6, with up to 64GB eMMC flash and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite’s claim that the 50 x 20mm DART-MX6 is the world’s smallest computer-on-module based on Freescale’s i.MX6 system-on-chip appears to be a valid one. It beats the smallest ones we’ve seen to date: TechNexion’s 40 x 36mm PICO-IMX6, and Solid-Run’s 47 x 30mm microSOM i4. It’s also just a hair larger than Variscite’s own 52 x 17mm DART-4460, which is based on a dual-core TI OMAP4460 SoC, and Gumstix’s slightly larger 58 x 17mm Overo modules, which use TI Sitara AM37xx SoCs. Read more

BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

The BQ Aquaris e4.5 Ubuntu Edition is not the debut Canonical must have envisaged for Ubuntu Phone, in the early days of the platform’s development. It’s a perfectly functional smartphone for the most part, and we like the concept of scopes, but the hardware is humdrum, performance is sluggish, and the software running on it is rough and ready, and full of holes. We’ll be tracking the progress of Ubuntu Phone with interest – it surely must get better than this – but this first device is one to write off to experience. Read more