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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kicking Off April With An Eight-Way BSD/Linux Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

For getting April started, here is a fresh comparison of various BSDs and Linux distributions tested on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box. Tested operating systems included Antergos, Clear Linux, DragonFlyBSD 4.8, FreeBSD 11.0, Scientific Linux 7.3, TrueOS 20160322, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, and Ubuntu 17.04 20170330.

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Also: Radeon TONGA Sees Some Gains With AMDGPU DRM-Next 4.12

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • April Fools' Or Should Wayland Switch Away From Using C?

    An independent developer wrote a message on the Wayland mailing list this weekend how Wayland should "move away from C." While Rust is all the fun these days to those looking towards a "safer" programming language, it was suggested Wayland be re-implemented in Haskell.

  • More Details On The Proposed Inputfd Protocol For Wayland

    A few days ago I wrote about Inputfd as a new Wayland protocol proposal for better supporting gaming devices. Peter Hutterer who drafted the proposal has now released a larger overview on this proposed addition.

  • [Intel-gfx] [GIT PULL] GVT-g next for 4.12 (with 4.11 fix)

    Here's GVT-g update for 4.12. Major things are vGPU scheduler QoS support from Gao Ping, initial KBL support on E3 server from Han Xu.

  • Intel GVT-g Updates Slated For Linux 4.12

    Intel has queued changes for their GVT-g graphics driver stack for Linux 4.12, allowing some improvements around their newly-mainlined graphics virtualization tech support for running VMs with accelerated graphics capabilities.

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel, Graphics, and Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Vulkan vs. OpenGL For Mad Max On AMD Ryzen

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Graphics/Benchmarks

It's been fun benchmarking Vulkan vs. OpenGL with Mad Max, Feral's first Linux game port featuring a beta Vulkan renderer. With the Radeon benchmarks and many NVIDIA Pascal tests yesterday an Intel Core i7 Kabylake CPU was used while for this article is a Mad Max run with AMD's Ryzen 7 1800X.

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Also: 14-Way NVIDIA Kepler/Maxwell/Pascal OpenGL vs. Vulkan With Mad Max On Linux

Mesa and Intel Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

RadeonSI OpenGL vs. RADV Vulkan Performance For Mad Max

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Feral Interactive today released their first Linux ported game into public beta that features a Vulkan renderer. Mad Max on Linux now supports Vulkan and OpenGL, making for some fun driver/GPU benchmarking. Up first are some Radeon RX 480 and R9 Fury Vulkan vs. OpenGL benchmarks for Mad Max when using Mesa 17.1-dev Git.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu Images for Oracle

  • Certified Ubuntu Images available on Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Service
    Certified Ubuntu images are now available in the Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services, providing developers with compute options ranging from single to 16 OCPU virtual machines (VMs) to high-performance, dedicated bare metal compute instances. This is in addition to the image already offered on Oracle Compute Cloud Service and maintains the ability for enterprises to add Canonical-backed Ubuntu Advantage Support and Systems Management. Oracle and Canonical customers now have access to the latest Ubuntu features, compliance accreditations and security updates.
  • Canonical's Certified Ubuntu Images Land in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Service
    Canonical announced the official availability of Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle's Bare Metal Cloud Services, which accompany the images that the company already provides in the Oracle Compute Cloud Service. Canonical's Certified Ubuntu images in Oracle Bare Metal Cloud Services are a great addition because they promise to provide developers with dedicated, high-performance bare-metal compute instances, as well as virtual machines with up to 16 Oracle Compute Unit (OCPU). They also add the ability for Oracle's enterprise customers to access the latest and greatest Ubuntu features.

Leftovers: Software

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