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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Stabilising performance after a major kernel revision

    A topic related to upstreaming patches on kernel forks related to embedded platforms is currently being discussed for Kernel Summit 2016. This is an age-old topic related to whether it is better to work upstream and backport or apply patches to a product-specific kernel and worry about forward-porting later. The points being raised have not changed over the years and still comes down to getting something out the door quickly versus long-term maintenance overhead. I’m not directly affected so had nothing new to add to the thread.

  • SLPC-Based Power Management Still Being Worked On For Intel's DRM Driver
  • NVIDIA Releases 370.28 Drivers for Linux

    Unfortunately, I don't tend to notice when Linux drivers get released; it's something I want to report more frequently on. Luckily, this time, I heard about NVIDIA's 370.28 graphics drivers while they were still fresh. This one opens up overclocking (and underclocking) for GeForce 10-series GPUs, although NVIDIA (of course) mentions that this is “at the user's own risk”. It also fixes a bunch of Vulkan bugs.

  • Input threads in the X server

    A great new feature has been merged during this 1.19 X server development cycle: we're now using threads for input [1]. Previously, there were two options for how an input driver would pass on events to the X server: polling or from within the signal handler. Polling simply adds all input devices' file descriptors to a select(2) loop that is processed in the mainloop of the server. The downside here is that if the server is busy rendering something, your input is delayed until that rendering is complete. Historically, polling was primarily used by the keyboard driver because it just doesn't matter much when key strokes are delayed. Both because you need the client to render them anyway (which it can't when it's busy) and possibly also because we're just so bloody used to typing delays.

  • The Threaded Input Support In X.Org Server 1.19

Intel Xeon E5-2609 v4 Broadwell-EP Linux Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Recently I purchased a Xeon E5-2609 v4 Broadwell-EP processor as a $300 Xeon with eight physical cores but clocked at just 1.7GHz and without any Turbo Boost while the TDP is 85 Watts. Here are some benchmarks compared to other LGA-2011 v3 CPUs in my possession under Linux along with an AMD FX reference point too and followed by some Skylake Xeon benchmarks.

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Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 370.28 Linux Driver Has Pascal Overclocking, PRIME Sync, PixelShiftMode

    NVIDIA's Unix team today released the 370.28 driver as their newest Linux/BSD/Solaris driver in their short-lived branch.

    The NVIDIA 370.28 driver most notably adds over/under-clocking support for GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. This Pascal clock adjustments via CoolBits was previously added to the NVIDIA 370 beta Linux driver from last month.

  • Nvidia 370.28 Linux Video Driver Available for Download with Vulkan Improvements

    Today, September 8, 2016, Nvidia released a new short-lived graphics driver for Linux and other UNIX-like operating systems, including FreeBSD and Solaris, the Nvidia 370.28.

    Looking at the release notes, we can notice that Nvidia 370.28 is here to add many fixes for bugs that have been reported by users since the last stable release, and it also looks like it contains that changes implemented during the Beta stages of development of the Nvidia 370.x graphics driver series.

    Yes, that's right, Nvidia 370.x was in Beta until today, and now Nvidia promoted it to the stable channel, but it's a short-lived branch, which means that it won't be supported for long until a new version will see the light of day, so our recommendation is to always stay on the long-live branch of the Nvidia video driver.

  • The Interesting Wayland/Vulkan/Graphics Talks Happening This Month At XDC2016
  • XWayland Pointer Confinement & Warping

    X.ORG --
    Playing legacy/X11 games on Wayland via XWayland may soon be in better shape with the latest slew of X Server patches.

    Jonas Ådahl today published a set of 12 patches for implementing pointer confinement and warping within XWayland.

  • Intel Has Been Working On A Fast 2D GPU Renderer Focused On Web Content

Phoronix Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Kernel and Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Next steps for Gmane

    We’ve rebuilt the storage system using ElasticSearch as the document store. We have used it for many projects and have nothing but a good. The site is currently a mixture of Python and PHP, the priority has been given to get the original functionality back in place; then work with the community to decide which of the Gmane interfaces are relevant and what we need to change to bring it up-to-date.

    We’ll do our utmost to continue in Lars’ footsteps, his hardwork and dedication to maintain this valuable Internet resource.

    Thank you Lars for the hardwork that you’ve put into Gmane over the past nearly two decades, all of the Gmane users are greatful to you!

  • Audio workshop accepted for Linux Plumbers Conference and Kernel Summit

    Audio is an increasingly important component of the Linux plumbing, given increased use of Linux for media workloads and of the Linux kernel for smartphones. Topics include low-latency audio, use of the clock API, propagating digital configuration through dynamic audio power management (DAPM), integration of HDA and ASoC, SoundWire ALSA use-case managemer (UCM) scalability, standardizing HDMI and DisplayPort interfaces, Media Controller API integration, and a number of topics relating to the multiple userspace users of Linux-kernel audio, including Android and ChromeOS as well as the various desktop-oriented Linux distributions.

  • Mainline Explicit Fencing – part 1
  • Improved Tear-Free Rendering For Radeon DDX With PRIME

    For those making use of the xf86-video-ati DDX driver in a PRIME-capable system with Radeon GPU, there's more effective tear-free rendering support with the latest development code.

  • A Mesa Fix Lands To Take Care Of The R9 290 Issue, Intel/Radeon Performance Problems

    A fix landed in Mesa Git today that should address various performance issues people have been seeing in different rare setups. The fix mostly seems to be for Radeon/Intel users seeing low performance recently with glxgears but also appears to help those affected by the much talked about R9 290 regression.

    The fix by Michel Dänzer is loader/dri3: Always use at least two back buffers. Michel commented on the simple change, "This can make a significant difference for performance with some extreme test cases such as vblank_mode=0 glxgears."

Kernel Space: Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver One Step Closer To Being Merged In Mesa

    While the ultimate vision of the open-source Radeon Vulkan driver isn't yet clear with RADV being the front-runner so far as the community-based driver while AMD has yet to open up their official Vulkan driver and there's been few remarks about RADV from AMD employees (aside from John Bridgman in our forums), RADV inched forward today in moving closer to being merged in mainline Mesa.

  • libinput and the Lenovo T450 and T460 series touchpads

    I'm using T450 and T460 as reference but this affects all laptops from the Lenovo *50 and *60 series. The Lenovo T450 and T460 have the same touchpad hardware, but unfortunately it suffers from what is probably a firmware issue. On really slow movements, the pointer has a halting motion. That effect disappears when the finger moves faster.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix and Others on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • RadeonSI Gets Another OpenGL 4.5 Extension: ARB_cull_distance
  • GCN 1.0 / Southern Islands On AMDGPU Takes Another Step Forward
  • Testing The Open-Source "RADV" Radeon Vulkan Driver vs. AMDGPU-PRO

    With word coming out last week that the RADV open-source Vulkan driver can now render Dota 2 correctly, I've been running some tests the past few days of this RADV Vulkan driver compared to AMD's official (but currently closed-source) Vulkan driver bundled with the AMDGPU-PRO Vulkan driver.

  • Keyboard Grabbing Protocol Proposed For Wayland
  • Wayland 1.12 Beta Released

    Bryce Harrington announced the release today of Wayland 1.12 beta and the associated Wayland compositor update.

    Ahead of next month's official Wayland/Weston 1.12 debut, version 1.11.92 was released today. The Wayland 1.12 beta has no new changes over the earlier alpha while Weston has some shell fixes, dropping shell_interface from libweston, and a DRM compositor change. The bare release announcements can be found here.

  • New xserver driver sort order - evdev < libinput < (synaptics|wacom|...)

    In the X server, the input driver assignment is handled by xorg.conf.d snippets. Each driver assigns itself to the type of devices it can handle and the driver that actually loaded is simply the one that sorts last. Historically, we've had the evdev driver sort low and assign itself to everything. synaptics, wacom and the other few drivers that matter sorted higher than evdev and thus assigned themselves to the respective device.

    When xf86-input-libinput first came out 2 years ago, we used a higher sort order than all other drivers to assign it to (almost) all devices. This was of course intentional because we believe that libinput is the best input stack around, the odd bug non-withstanding. Now it has matured a fair bit and we had a lot more exposure to various types of hardware. We've been quirking and fixing things like crazy and libinput is much better for it.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Releases

  • The Changes So Far For The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    We are now through week one of two for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window. I've already written a number of news posts this past week covering features I find interesting for Linux 4.11. If you are short on time and behind in your Phoronix reading, here's a quick overview of the material so far for this next major kernel bump.
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    A proposal floated this week on an OpenJDK mailing list calls for porting the JDK (Java Development Kit), including the Java Runtime Environment, Java compiler and APIs, to both the distribution and the musl C standard library, which is supported by Alpine Linux. The key focus here is musl; Java has previously been ported to the standard glibc library, which you can install in Alpine, but the standard Alpine release switched two years ago to musl because it’s much faster and more compact.
  • Linux From Scratch 8.0 Released, Brings New Changes And Features

today's howtos

Jolla inks exclusive license to kick-start its Android alternative in China

Mobile OS maker Jolla, whose Sailfish platform remains one of the few smartphone alternatives in play these days, has signed an exclusive license to a Chinese consortium to develop a Sailfish-based OS for the country. Jolla says the Chinese consortium will be aiming to invest $250M in developing a Sailfish ecosystem for the country, though it’s not specifying exactly is backing the consortia at this point, nor over what timeframe the investment will happen — beyond saying one of its early investors, a local private equity investor Shan Li, will take a “leading role” in building it up. “There are very big players behind it,” Jolla chairman Antti Saarnio tells TechCrunch, speaking ahead of a press conference held to announce the news here at the Mobile World Congress tradeshow in Barcelona. Read more

Khronos and Vulkan