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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia 361.16 Beta Out Now for Linux, BSD and Solaris with OpenGL Vendor-Neutral Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier today, January 5, 2016, Nvidia announced the release of a new Beta version of its graphics drivers for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD and Solaris operating systems, version 361.16.

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Leftovers: Kernel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Car Makers Rev Up Automotive Grade Linux at CES

    The hottest up-and-coming auto show may very well be CES. Many of the world’s biggest automakers will be there, and they’ll be showing off more than new electric or self-driving cars. The technology inside our cars for music, infotainment, and GPS is also a big part of story. Especially with consumers expecting their “connected” car experience to be as glitzy, convenient, simple and easy to upgrade as their smart phone or wearable.

  • NVIDIA 361.16 Beta Driver Now Includes Long-Awaited GLVND

    NVIDIA's Unix graphics driver team is starting off the new year by releasing their first public beta in the 361 Linux driver series.

  • VA-API Video Acceleration Now Enabled For Nouveau Gallium3D

    For the past few months a Samsung developer has been working on VA-API support for Nouveau. After a few patch revisions, that work is finally hitting mainline Mesa.

    Landing in Mesa this morning was NVC0 driver's support for the VA state tracker (Video Acceleration State Tracker) and enabling the support for builds.

Nvidia Uses Ubuntu at CES 2016 to Show Nvidia DriveWorks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia announced at CES 2016 some really interesting new hardware that’s aimed at autonomous cars, along with NVIDIA DriveWorks, and it looks like they used Ubuntu for the demo.

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How Close Fedora Is To Switching To Wayland By Default

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GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Red Hat

Kevin Martin of the Fedora Project has written a status update and plan around the "Wayland-by-default" effort for Fedora 24.

Kevin provided a status update via this desktop list update. The current state of various Wayland features are now listed via this Fedora Wiki page.

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Also: Primary Selection Support Still Being Worked On For Wayland

NVIDIA's 2016 Tegra SoC Is Looking Even More Interesting

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Graphics/Benchmarks

At NVIDIA's CES press conference last night they announced the DRIVE PX2 as a "in-car super-computer" that's "as powerful as 150 MacBook Pros", while this SC is powered by a yet-to-be-announced SoC.

The DRIVE PX2 is designed for self-driving cars and with having so much information to process, the SoC powering this has to be a beast. NVIDIA hasn't formally announced the SoC successor to the Tegra X1, but there's speculation that this System-on-a-Chip could be a refined version of the delayed "Parker" SoC.

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Phoronix on Kernel, Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Features To Start Looking Forward To For Linux 4.5

    With Linux 4.4 expected next weekend, here's a look at some of the early features we've already been talking about on Phoronix that should be on the table for the Linux 4.5 merge window.

  • How AMD's Proprietary Linux Driver Evolved In 2015

    Last month I showed how AMD's open-source driver performance evolved in 2015 while today's article is looking at how the closed-source AMD / Radeon Technologies Group proprietary driver has evolved over the course of the year.

  • X.Org Server Development Slows To Lowest Point In A Decade

    In 2015 there were just 436 commits for the entire year -- in 2014 there were 923 commits, which was about average recently. The high point of X.Org Server's development was around 2008 when there were 2,114 commits in a single year. Except for 2015, every year saw close to a thousand or more commits going back a decade. In 2004 there were 590 commits while in 2003 there were 125 commits. Of course, prior to 2004 the X.Org Server was technically the XFree86 code-base.

Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • PCI Express Speed Changes Still Being Worked On For Nouveau

    Karol Herbst today published the fourth version of the PCI Express speed changes. These nine patches add support for parsing the capable PCI speed from the video BIOS for "tesla" GPUs and newer, wires up support for changing the PCI Express speed for Tesla/Fermi/Kepler (and newer), and then lastly hooks up support for changing the PCI-E speed based upon the performance state (pstate) level.

  • Mesa Saw The Most Commits Last Year Since 2010
  • Better Multi Indirect Draw Support Coming To Mesa

    Ilia Mirkin has seemingly not taken much time off from his Mesa hacking for the holidays. On Thursday this developer who most frequently works on the Nouveau and Freedreno drivers has published patches for better ARB_multi_draw_indirect handling.

    The GL_ARB_multi_draw_indirect extension is mandated by OpenGL 4.3. Core Mesa and all of the key drivers have already handled this extension with the exception of Nouveau NV50. However, Mirkin is hoping to enhance the implementation.

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

DragonFlyBSD Rebases Its Intel Kernel Graphics Driver Against Linux 4.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD

DragonFlyBSD's Francois Tigeot has done some more great work in allowing their open-source Intel graphics driver to be more featureful and comparable to the Linux i915 kernel DRM driver for which it is based.

While DragonFly's i915 DRM driver started out as woefully outdated compared to the upstream Linux kernel code, the work done by Tigeot and others is quite close to re-basing against the latest mainline code. With patches published recently, the DragonFlyBSD driver would now be comparable to what's in the Linux 4.0 kernel.

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Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The Open-Source NVIDIA Linux Driver Continued Evolving In 2015

    This year the open-source NVIDIA Linux driver (Nouveau) continued to evolve with improvements for re-clocking, the start of OpenGL 4 support, and other new functionality. Here's a recap along with some performance benchmarks showing how the OpenGL performance evolved over the past 12 months.

  • AMD/Radeon Has Continued Making Much Linux Graphics Progress

    AMD's open-source graphics driver stack continued maturing in 2015 while Catalyst (now known as Radeon Software) releases were rare. AMD's open-source driver stack now supports OpenGL 4.1 for GCN GPUs and select pre-GCN graphics cards plus the other driver stack also matured in other ways this year.

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