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Graphics/Benchmarks

GPUs and Graphics: Nvidia, X.Org Developers' Conference, vRt and ROCm

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

A Look At Linux Application Scaling Up To 128 Threads

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Arriving last week in our Linux benchmarking lab was a dual EPYC server -- this Dell PowerEdge R7425 is a beast of a system with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors yielding a combined 64 cores / 128 threads, 512GB of RAM (16 x 32GB DDR4), and 20 x 500GB Samsung 860 EVO SSDs. There will be many interesting benchmarks from this server in the days and weeks ahead. For some initial measurements during the first few days of stress testing this 2U rack server, here is a look at how well various benchmarks/applications are scaling from two to 128 threads.

This article with these benchmarks is mainly intended for reference purposes for those curious how well different Linux workloads scale up to 128 threads with these multi-core benchmarks available via the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org. Tests were done with 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 cores enabled and then the default configuration of 64 threads plus SMT to yield 128 threads of jaw-dropping power.

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DragonFlyBSD 5.3 Offering Some Performance Improvements

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the release of DragonFlyBSD 5.2 this past April there have been many improvements to this popular BSD operating system, including on the performance front. I recently wrapped up some fresh benchmarks of DragonFlyBSD 5.3-DEVELOPMENT for seeing what the performance is looking like in what will eventually be released as DragonFlyBSD 5.4.

A lot of recent DragonFlyBSD coverage has been around its support/optimizations for Threadripper 2 with lead DragonFlyBSD developer Matthew Dillon being a big fan of these new high-core count CPUs. In this article though tests are being done from an Intel Xeon "Skylake" CPU for looking at the performance work outside of that scope.

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Graphics/Hardware: CUDA, AMD, Intel and Phoronix Test Suite

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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti To GTX 980 Ti TensorFlow Benchmarks With ResNet-50, AlexNet, GoogLeNet, Inception, VGG-16

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those curious about the TensorFlow performance on the newly-released GeForce RTX 2080 series, for your viewing pleasure to kick off this week of Linux benchmarking is a look at Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing graphics cards in my possession when testing the NGC TensorFlow instance on CUDA 10.0 with the 410.57 Linux driver atop Ubuntu and exploring the performance of various models. Besides the raw performance, the performance-per-Watt and performance-per-dollar is also provided.

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Graphics: DRM-Next, RadeonSI and Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The Great Work In DRM-Next: More Icelake, Vega 20, xGMI & Other Additions

    Whether it's called Linux 4.20 or Linux 5.0, the next kernel cycle is bringing a heck of a lot of improvements for the open-source graphics/display drivers on the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) front.

    With the period for merging new feature work into DRM-Next ahead of this next Linux kernel cycle effectively being over, here's a look back at the mass amount of new feature code that's queued and waiting for this next kernel merge window to begin within a week or two.

  • RadeonSI Fast Color Clears Should Now Be Even Faster

    Prolific Radeon Mesa contributor Marek Olšák of AMD started off his Sunday by posting another set of RadeonSI driver patches.

    These four patches for now are just on the mailing list but will presumably soon be part of Mesa 18.3-dev. One of the patches is worth noting in that compute shaders are now used for clear and copy buffers. Marek noted that fast color clears as a result should be much faster. If you happen to hit fast color clears on evicted buffers, he noted they should now be 200x faster on GFX8 hardware and older. GFX8 covers Polaris going back to Fiji and Tonga, so basically any GCN GPUs pre-Vega should be helped out with this latest patch work.

  • Vulkan 1.1.87 Released But Not Yet Any Experimental Transform Feedback

    Vulkan 1.1.87 is another Sunday morning update to the Vulkan graphics/compute specification.

    This time around, however, there are no new Vulkan extensions... Most notably we have been looking forward to the unofficial Vulkan transform feedback extension for helping out projects like DXVK and VKD3D for mapping Direct3D with Stream Outputs on top of Vulkan. This is expected within "weeks" but didn't make the cut for the Vulkan 1.1.87 specification update.

Graphics: Mesa 18.2.2 Released and Kazan Vulkan CPU/Software-Based Implementation Being Rewritten In Rust

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.2.2

    Mesa 18.2.2 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    Different patches for the DirectX9 and DRI state trackers.

  • Mesa 18.2.2 Released With RADV GTA V Fix, Vulkan Additions & D3D9 Patches

    Mesa 18.2.2 is out this morning as the second point release to the Q3'2018 stable release series.

  • The Kazan Vulkan CPU/Software-Based Implementation Being Rewritten In Rust

    Remember Kazan, the project originally known as Vulkan-CPU? That was the Google Summer of Code 2017 project to implement a CPU/software-based Vulkan driver. It had been dormant since GSoC 2017 ended, but now work on it has been restarted.

    Kazan development stalled shortly after GSoC 2017 when the student developer Jacob Lifshay was busy again with university. But now after a year he's decided to working on Kazan.

RADV vs. AMDVLK vs. Radeon Software Vulkan Driver Performance - October 2018 Linux Gaming

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Gaming

Given AMD's weekly updating of the public AMDVLK Vulkan driver source tree as their official open-source Vulkan Linux driver while RADV continues to be maintained as the popular open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within the Mesa source tree, here is a fresh look at how those competing drivers perform. Additionally there are the results from Radeon Software / AMDGPU-PRO using its closed-source Vulkan driver that is derived from the same sources as AMDVLK but built against AMD's proprietary shader compiler.

This round of benchmarking is a look at the fresh AMD Vulkan Linux driver performance on these three options when testing with a Radeon RX 580 and RX Vega 64 graphics cards. The same Core i7 8086K system was used the entire time (obviously) and it was running with Ubuntu 18.04 on the Linux 4.19-rc6 kernel. The Vulkan driver configurations came down to...

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Graphics: Linux GPU Drivers, Mesa, Freedreno and Intel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Google Still Doesn't Trust Linux GPU Drivers Enough To Enable Chrome Video Acceleration

    It's 2018 and while Linux GPU drivers have improved a lot in recent years, Google engineers still don't find them reliable enough to ship the Chrome web-browser with GPU video decoding enabled.

    There was a discussion once again about shipping Chrome with Linux GPU video acceleration enabled. But once again Chrome developers feel that the cons and increased maintenance burden of having to deal with Linux GPU video acceleration problems outweigh the benefits of a better Linux video playback experience and possible power-savings. Of course, that's unless talking about Chrome OS where they do have GPU video acceleration within their Linux-based OS.

  • RADV In Mesa 18.2.2 Gets Steam Play + GTA V Fixes, SteamVR Hang Fix

    It's time for another two-week Mesa 18.2 point release, which is v18.2.2 and preparing for release on Friday.

    Mesa 18.2.2 is a much smaller update than Mesa 18.2.1 with just under two dozen fixes queued at this point, but there are some notable changes.

  • Freedreno Enables Hardware Binning For Adreno A6xx GPUs - Yields Better Performance

    The open-source 3D driver support for Qualcomm Adreno A6xx series hardware has taken another step forward with the latest Mesa 18.3-devel Git.

    The reverse-engineered Freedreno Gallium3D driver has enabled support for hardware binning on the A6xx series hardware, the latest generation of GPUs found in Qualcomm SoCs. It was just back in August that the initial A6xx support landed inside this Gallium3D driver.

  • Proposed Changes To Intel GPU Top Would Make It A More Useful Utility

    Among the developer/enthusiast tool-set of the Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developers has been Intel GPU Top (the command intel_gpu_top) that is distributed with the Intel-GPU-Tools collection. This GPU information utility inspired by Linux's well known top command reports for Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics hardware the usage information, but does require root privileges to operate. Intel GPU Top is about to get a major overhaul.

    Intel GPU Top hasn't been the most useful utility particularly among non-developers, but Intel's Tvrtko Ursulin is proposing a set of changes he entitled the "21st century intel_gpu_top." These 13 patches add a lot of useful reporting to the command-line based utility.

The Ubuntu Linux Performance Over The Past Six Years On An Intel Xeon Server

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

In needing to make some room in the racks for some new hardware and some other interesting platforms on the way, I've retired the last of the Intel Nehalem era hardware at Phoronix that was still used for occasional historical Linux performance tests... I decided to take this Sun Microsystems SunFire X4170 server with dual Intel Xeon E5540 (Nehalem EP) processors for a final spin before pulling it from the racks. Here is a look at how the near-final Ubuntu 18.10 Linux performance compares to that of Ubuntu 12.10.

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BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.