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Graphics/Benchmarks

Wayland/Weston 1.6 Release Candidate 1 Is Out

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Wayland 1.6 is finally close to materializing and should be officially released later this month.

Pekka Paalanen of Collabora has been handling Wayland 1.6 release management in the absence of Wayland founder Kristian Høgsberg. There was a Wayland 1.6 Alpha in late August while out today is Wayland 1.6 RC1 along with a release candidate to the Weston compositor.

If all goes well a second release candidate to Wayland will be out next week and then the final Wayland / Weston 1.6 releases the following week. The Wayland/Weston 1.6 RC1 announcement can be found on the Wayland mailing list.

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Canonical Has Joined The Khronos Group To Contribute To The Creation Of Mir/Wayland Drivers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

For now, both Mir and Wayland are under massive development, none of them being used on desktop yet. While Mir is testable via the Ubuntu Touch Next Image, Wayland will be added to the default repositories of Fedora, but will not be used as default.

At first, Canonical intended to use Red Hat’s Wayland on their Ubuntu Touch, but it was difficult for them to submit patches and customizations for the mobile device and so, they decided to do the work themselves and created Mir.

Recently, Canonical has joined the Khronos Group to contribute to the creation of Mir/Wayland drivers.

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More Linux Benchmarks Of The AMD FX-8370E / FX-8370 / FX-9590

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In adding some extra tests besides what was shared in our large Linux review of the new AMD FX CPUs from earlier in the week, that included a fairly big comparison of Intel and AMD CPUs, here's some more Linux test results for just the FX-8370E, FX-8370, and FX-9590 processors.

This latest article are some more results conducted from the ASRock 990FX Killer AM3+ motherboard for all three eight-core CPUs. The Cooler Master Seidon 120XL water cooler was used for keeping the CPUs running well. Ubuntu 14.04 was still the host on the system while using the Linux 3.17 development kernel and Mesa 10.4-devel via the Oibaf PPA. GCC 4.8.2 was the host compiler.

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GCC 5.0 Outruns LLVM 3.5 Compiler By A Bit On Core-AVX2

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Development
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks

In anticipation of the LLVM 3.5 release that brings a number of new compiler features -- including possible performance improvements from our benchmarking done earlier today -- here's some benchmarks comparing LLVM Clang 3.5 RC3 to a recent SVN snapshot of the GCC 5.0 compiler that's presently under development.

GCC 5.0 is still under heavy stage one development and isn't anticipated for release likely until H1'2015, so there's still a ways to go with the GNU Compiler Collection, but these brief benchmarks today should provide some nice perspective for how it's shaping up against LLVM Clang 3.5. Of course, as GCC 5.0 nears, we'll have plenty more compiler benchmarks over the months ahead.

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Intel Lands More Graphics Changes For Linux 3.18

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For the Linux 3.18 kernel Intel has ready some more DRM graphics driver changes beyond the exciting work already sent into drm-next.

Intel already landed in the drm-next tree improved Cherryview support and many other changes while this week another patch series sent in by Intel OTC's Daniel Vetter just landed into drm-next. The changes outlined by Vetter include:

- basic code for execlist, which is the fancy new cmd submission on gen8. Still disabled by default (Ben, Oscar Mateo, Thomas Daniel et al)
- remove the useless usage of console_lock for I915_FBDEV=n (Chris)
- clean up relations between ctx and ppgtt
- clean up ppgtt lifetime handling (Michel Thierry)
- various cursor code improvements from Ville
- execbuffer code cleanups and secure batch fixes (Chris)
- prep work for dev -> dev_priv transition (Chris)
- some of the prep patches for the seqno -> request object transition (Chris)
- various small improvements all over

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Ondemand vs. Performance CPU Governing For AMD FX CPUs On Linux 3.17

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In the tests shared yesterday of looking at the AMD FX-9590 CPU on Linux and other CPU benchmarks from this weekend, some Phoronix readers raised concerns about the CPU scaling governor differences between the AMD and Intel hardware. The AMD FX CPUs continue to use the CPUfreq driver by default to handle their scaling while modern Intel CPUs have the new Intel P-State driver. Beyond the Intel-specific P-State vs. CPUfreq, the AMD CPUs generally default to using the "ondemand" governor while with Intel desktop CPUs on P-State it generally ends up with the "performance" mode. Some Phoronix readers found performance vs. ondemand differences to be unfair, but for AMD FX CPUs, there isn't much of a difference in our common CPU torture test benchmarks found in the Phoronix Test Suite.

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Nouveau X.Org Driver Released With DRI3+Present, Maxwell, GLAMOR

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The Nouveau development community released the xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.11 driver update to kick off the start of September. While you wouldn't guess it from the version number, this driver update is actually very significant and introduces a lot of new functionality and other improvements.

First up, this new Nouveau DDX adds GLAMOR support as long as you're on X.Org Server 1.16 or newer (it doesn't use the external GLAMOR library). The GLAMOR support is optional for all NVIDIA hardware as a means of accelerating 2D over OpenGL while for Maxwell hardware and future generations it's now a requirement. Like AMD with their GCN HD 7000 series hardware and newer, they're no longer writing 2D code-paths but letting their OpenGL enablement take care of everything.

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Mesa 10.3 release candidate 2

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 10.3 release candidate 2 is now available for testing. The current
plan of record is to have an additional release candidate each Friday
until the 10.3 release on Friday, September 12th.

The tag in the GIT repository for Mesa 10.3-rc2 is 'mesa-10.3-rc2'. I
have verified that the tag is in the correct place in the tree.

Mesa 10.3 release candidate 2 is available for download at
ftp://freedesktop.org/pub/mesa/10.3/

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Ubuntu 14.10's Lack Of X.Org Server 1.16 Gets Blamed On AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday I wrote about Ubuntu 14.10 not yet having X.Org Server 1.16 even though the first beta was issued this week and there's been a testing package repository for more than one month. This lack of X.Org Server 1.16 thus far is apparently due to AMD with not yet having a supportive Catalyst driver.

In the comments to yesterday's story, Timo Aaltonen of Canonical and part of their X/graphics team responded. "no fglrx, can't force people to switch to radeon and likely regress, on newer hw at least."

So Canonical is keeping away from using the latest X.Org code since the Catalyst (fglrx) driver doesn't yet support it and they don't want to regress users by forcing them to use the improving but still less than perfect open-source driver. Canonical's effectively bowing down to a binary blob.

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How Intel HD Graphics On Linux Compare To Open-Source AMD/NVIDIA Drivers With Steam On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As earlier this week I did a 20-way AMD Radeon open-source comparison, looked at the most energy efficient Radeon GPUs for Linux gaming, and then yesterday provided a look at the fastest NVIDIA GPUs for open-source gaming with Nouveau, in this article is a culmination of all the open-source graphics tests this week while seeing how Intel Haswell HD Graphics fall into the mix against the open-source Radeon R600/RadeonSI and Nouveau NV50/NVC0 graphics drivers.

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Fedora Notifications, 0.3.0 Release

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ChromeOS vs Linux: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Anyone who believes Google isn't "making a play" for desktop users isn't paying attention. In recent years, I've seen ChromeOS making quite a splash on the Google Chromebook. Exploding with popularity on sites such as Amazon.com, it looks as if ChromeOS could be unstoppable. In this article, I'm going to look at ChromeOS as a concept to market, how it's affecting Linux adoption and whether or not it's a good/bad thing for the Linux community as a whole. Plus, I'll talk about the biggest issue of all and how no one is doing anything about it. Read more

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FOSS Around the World: Latin America

Too often coverage of free/open source software news and commentary tends to focus on either developments and activities in North America or in Europe. While much of the news is made on these two continents, there’s a wider world out there where folks are doing some substantial things, and promoting FOSS in their own way in their own areas. Periodically, we at FOSS Force will be looking at areas of the world which have been either overlooked or neglected in digital news coverage. Today we’ll start south of the U.S. border with Latin America — Mexico, along with Central and South America, for those of you keeping track on maps at home. Read more