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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Kernels 4.10.9, 4.9.21 LTS and 4.4.60 LTS Bring Many XFS Improvements

    Renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman had the pleasure of announcing the release of three new maintenance updates for the long-term supported Linux 4.9 and 4.4 kernels series, as well as Linux kernel 4.10.

    The Linux 4.10.9, 4.9.21 LTS and 4.4.60 LTS kernels are now the latest versions of the kernel branches mentioned above, and they come exactly one week after the release of their previous maintenance updates, namely Linux kernels 4.10.8, 4.9.20 LTS and 4.4.59 LTS. The difference is that these are bigger patches, changing 91 files, with 1229 insertions and 1067 deletions for Linux kernel 4.10.9, and 87 files, with 1332 insertions and 1109 deletions for Linux kernel 4.9.21 LTS.

  • Kernel lockdown

    These patches provide a facility by which a variety of avenues by which userspace can feasibly modify the running kernel image can be locked down.

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 Proprietary Graphics Driver Adds Support for Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS

    AMD quietly released a few days ago a new stable version of its proprietary graphics driver for Linux-based operating systems, supporting various AMD Radeon graphics.

    AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 is here a little over two months after the AMDGPU-PRO 16.60 release, which added support for AMD Radeon HD 7xxx/8xxx graphics cards. This version, however, appears to add support for Canonical's latest Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, but only for the 64-bit version of it.

  • Intel Has A Last Feature Pile Of Work For Linux 4.12 DRM

    On Friday, Intel's Daniel Vetter submitted a final pile of feature material for DRM-Next that will target the Linux 4.12 kernel, with the deadline for 4.12 DRM-Next being this weekend.

    Already this cycle for DRM-Next we have seen from Intel atomic mode-setting by default, GPU reset improvements, power management improvements, continued work on Geminilake enablement, better context switching, refactoring of GuC and HuC firmware code, vGPU enhancements, and other changes.

  • Nouveau Gets Patches For OpenGL AZDO ARB_shader_ballot

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • You'll Need To Wait Until Next Week To Torture Your Linux GPU With Superposition

    Unigine's first public Unigine 2 tech demo, Superposition, was due to be released yesterday (6 April) but was delayed at the last minute. But next week Linux (and Windows) users -- including RadeonSI drivers -- should be able to have fun torturing your hardware with this demanding OpenGL benchmark.

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 Released With Ubuntu 16.04.2 Support

    AMD has released the AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 hybrid Linux graphics driver.

    The only "highlight" listed for AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 is Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS support. But that itself is significant since if they are referring to 16.04.2's hardware enablement stack, then AMDGPU-PRO is now working on at least the Linux 4.8 kernel without issues. I am in the process of setting up AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 on my Radeon test systems to see if Linux 4.8 is working nicely and if Linux 4.10~4.11 will work. This should also mean AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 should play nicely now on Ubuntu 16.10 due to sharing the same components of the 16.40.2 HWE stack.

  • AMDGPU-PRO 17.10 driver released

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

AMDGPU vs. Radeon DRM With GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs On Linux 4.11, Mesa 17.1-dev

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With the upcoming Linux 4.11 kernel release as well as for the next cycle (Linux 4.12), the Radeon DRM driver remains the default for AMD GCN 1.0/1.1 GPUs while the newer AMDGPU DRM driver continues offering "experimental" support for these earlier generations of GCN GPUs. As it's been a while since our last Radeon vs. AMDGPU GCN 1.0/1.1 benchmarks, here are some fresh tests today with Linux 4.11 Git.

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Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server 1.19 Finally Lands in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) for Better Gaming

    After a long wait, it finally happened, Canonical pushed today the latest X.Org Server 1.19 display server to the main repositories of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) operating system.

    In mid-March, Canonical's Timo Aaltonen announced the availability of the X.Org Server 1.19.2 packages in the proposed repositories of Ubuntu 17.04, along with the Mesa 17.0 3D Graphics Library. It took about a month of testing, but the X.Org Server packages were finally upgraded from the old 1.18.4 release to version 1.19.3.

  • OpenGL vs Vulkan in Mad Max, re-tested

    Since Feral Interactive have fixed up the OpenGL renderer in the Mad Max [Steam] Beta, here are some fresh OpenGL vs Vulkan tests.

    I already cleared up the issue before and included some manual testing, see here.

    These new tests are re-done using their benchmark feature, which is unique to the Linux version. This should now give a much more accurate look at how OpenGL fares against Vulkan in some heavy areas of the game.

  • The EU Is Funding Work Into Low-Power GPU Tech

    LPGPU is a new research initiative funded by the European Union to explore low-power GPU technologies.

    When first hearing of "LPGPU" from a Phoronix reader I figured it was another project like the failed Project VGA and other incomplete efforts around having an open-source GPU design. But this LPGPU effort is backed by the EU and has the involvement of some notable members for their research into low-power GPU tech and isn't about delivering a new GPU itself. LPGPU appears to be largely focused on software advancements for bettering today's low-power GPU hardware.

CPUFreq vs. P-State CPU Scaling Governor Tests On Various Vulkan/OpenGL Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the recent release of some new Linux games like the Serious Sam 2017 update and Max Max, also with featuring Vulkan renderers, here are some fresh Intel P-State vs. ACPI CPUFreq frequency scaling driver and governor comparisons with a variety of Linux games.

Particularly on the P-State side, our CPU scaling driver tests over the years have showed the potential for big swings in performance depending upon the governor/driver, but in other games there are minimal differences. The Intel CPU generation can also play a role with sometimes the newer Intel hardware having a tougher time performing well with the Intel P-State powersave mode that's commonly the default on many Linux distributions.

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Kicking Off April With An Eight-Way BSD/Linux Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

For getting April started, here is a fresh comparison of various BSDs and Linux distributions tested on an Intel Core i7 6800K Broadwell-E box. Tested operating systems included Antergos, Clear Linux, DragonFlyBSD 4.8, FreeBSD 11.0, Scientific Linux 7.3, TrueOS 20160322, Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS, and Ubuntu 17.04 20170330.

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Also: Radeon TONGA Sees Some Gains With AMDGPU DRM-Next 4.12

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 17.04: Unity's swan song?

For the most part, not much has changed on Ubuntu's Desktop edition in the past year. Unity 7 has more or less remained the same while work was progressing on the next version of the desktop, Unity 8. However, now that both desktops are being retired in favour of the GNOME desktop, running Ubuntu 17.04 feels a bit strange. This week I was running software that has probably reached the end of its life and this version of Ubuntu will only be supported for nine months. I could probably get the same desktop experience and most of the same hardware support running Ubuntu 16.04 and get security updates through to 2021 in the bargain. In short, I don't think Ubuntu 17.04 offers users anything significant over last year's 16.04 LTS release and it will be retired sooner. That being said, I could not help but be a little wistful about using Unity 7 again. Even though it has been about a year since I last used Unity, I quickly fell back into the routine and I was once more reminded how pleasant it can be to use Unity. The desktop is geared almost perfectly to my workflow and the controls are set up in a way that reduces my mouse usage to almost nothing. I find Unity a very comfortable desktop to use, especially when application menus have been moved from the top panel to inside their own windows. While there are some projects trying to carry on development of Unity, this release of Ubuntu feels like Unity's swan song and I have greatly enjoyed using the desktop this week. While there is not much new in Ubuntu 17.04, the release is pretty solid. Apart from the confusion that may arise from having three different package managers, I found Ubuntu to be capable, fairly newcomer friendly and stable. Everything worked well for me, at least on physical hardware. Unity is a bit slow to use in a virtual machine, but the distribution worked smoothly on my desktop computer. Read more

FOSS in European Public Services

  • France: How a high school association finally obtained a source code
    In October 2016, the association Droit des Lycéens, which represents French high school students and helps them assert their rights, finally obtained the source code of an algorithm that influences students’ choice of university after the Baccalauréat exam. This puts an end to a conflict lasting more than seven months between the association and the Ministry of Education, which until then had refused to publish the source code of its tool. The opening of algorithms and calculators is a flagship measure in the French law for a digital republic that was passed in 2016. Since then, France has started to publish some source codes, such as the personal tax calculator in April 2016. This may have created a precedent for the present case, according to the association. The algorithm in question forms the core of the APB (Admission Post-Bac) online platform, which is used by all students in France. It allows them to enter their preferences in terms of universities and syllabus, and helps match applicants to available places. But Droit des Lycéens believes that the calculation method has been kept secret by the Ministry, and lacks transparency.
  • OFE welcomes continued emphasis on openness in EIF
    The OpenForum Europe (OFE) think tank welcomes the publication of the European Interoperability Framework (EIF). This document continues to emphasise the importance of openness, the organisation writes on its blog.
  • Czech Finance Ministry app boosts open data, source
    A data visualisation application developed in 2015 by the Czech Ministry of Finance, is helping to promote the publication of open data, and is making the case for open source software development across the government. The tool, called Supervizor, was one of the winners of the European Commission’s Sharing and Reuse Award. At the Sharing and Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal), on 29 March, Supervizor was awarded EUR 15,000 - to help the project expands its reach.

Leftovers: Gaming

Kernel Space/Linux