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Graphics/Benchmarks

Imagine 128 & Matrox Linux X.Org Display Drivers See Updates For The 2018 Holidays

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Graphics/Benchmarks

If you happen to have any Number Nine Imagine 128 or Matrox graphics cards sitting around, there are new Linux X.Org display driver updates out this weekend for these vintage parts.

Should you have an Imagine 128 PCI graphics card still around, the xf86-video-i128 driver has been updated. This new open-source X.Org display driver update has just some compiler/build updates but nothing too exciting unless you just enjoying reminiscing over old display hardware.

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AMD Adding New Vega 10 & Vega 20 IDs To Their Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While we are looking forward to AMD's next-gen Navi architecture in 2019, it looks like the Vega family may be getting bigger soon.

Hot off finishing up the Radeon RX 590 Linux support as their new Polaris refresh, it looks like another Vega 20 part may be in the pipeline as well as multiple new Vega 10 SKUs.

Friday afternoon patches to the company's RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers reveal some new PCI IDs. On top of the five "Vega 20" PCI IDs already part of the Linux driver, a 0x66A4 ID is being added. So far AMD has just announced the Radeon Instinct MI50 and MI60 accelerators as being built off Vega 20 with no consumer parts at this time. As with most new product generations, it doesn't necessarily mean AMD will be launching 5~6 Vega 20 products, but sometimes PCI IDs are reserved for pre-production hardware, the possibility of expanding the product line in the future, etc.

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Graphics: NVIDIA, Allwinner and Intel

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 415.22 Linux Driver Adds Mainline Support For Vulkan Transform Feedback

    NVIDIA has released an updated stable 415 series Linux driver today. While normally their stable driver updates aren't too exciting compared to the beta development releases, this update is notable for adding VK_EXT_transform_feedback.

  • NVIDIA driver 415.22 is out for Linux, finally adding Transform Feedback support

    Finally, after waiting for a few months NVIDIA has released a new mainline driver which includes Transform Feedback support. Previously, you had to use their special Vulkan beta driver to get it.

    The "VK_EXT_transform_feedback" extension is one that was made especially for helping support translation layers from other 3D APIs. In our case, it helps DXVK plus Wine (and so Valve's Steam Play) with certain Windows games when run on Linux.

  • Cedrus Video Decode Driver Moving Along With Allwinner H5/A64 Support

    With the Linux 4.20 kernel the Cedrus VPU decoder driver was mainlined that was developed this year over at Bootlin for providing open-source accelerated video support for Allwinner SoCs. That driver continues to be ramped up to increase its usefulness.

  • Intel GVT Might Introduce Coffeelake Support In Linux 4.22

    While Coffeelake processors have been available for a year now, Intel initially didn't intend to support their open-source Graphics Virtualization Technology (GVT) with these chips but now are in the process of bringing up such support.

    This feature request has been tracking the Coffeelake GVT-g support request the past year. Initially they didn't intend to support Coffeelake nor Cannonlake but were focusing resources on Icelake and maintaining the existing Skylake/Kabylake support for this tech that allows KVM/Xen virtual machines to access the Intel HD/UHD Graphics hardware.

AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the very newest AMDGPU Linux kernel patches, the Radeon RX 590 is now working correctly on Linux. Here's a look at how this latest Polaris graphics card is performing for Linux games against seventeen other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards in a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan benchmarks.

AMD launched the Radeon RX 590 in mid-November as a Polaris shrink down to 12nm and featuring 36 compute units, a base frequency up to 1469MHz and boost up to 1545MHz, 2304 Stream processors, 8GB of GDDR5 video memory, and is rated for up to 7.1 TFLOPs of performance potential.

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Mesa 18.3.0

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.3.0

    Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

    This release consists of approximately 1700 commits from 120 developers.

    Huge thanks to all the developers, testers and users for their ongoing work and support shaping up the 18.3.0 release.

  • Mesa 18.3 Released With Intel & Radeon Vulkan Driver Improvements, New GPU Support

    Mesa 18.3 is now available as the latest quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL and Vulkan graphics drivers for Linux.

    The Mesa 18.3 features are aplenty and on the AMD side range from Raven 2, Picasso, and Vega 20 support through RADV Vulkan transform feedback, faster RadeonSI fast color clears, OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, and many RADV Vulkan additions. The Intel stack meanwhile picked up new PCI IDs, various Vulkan driver extensions, and more.

  • Mesa 18.3.0 for those of you using the open source drivers

    For those of you using Intel and AMD (and some older NVIDIA cards) Mesa 18.3.0 was officially released today.

    It has been three months since the last major release, so as expected this new and improved version comes with all the latest bells and whistles.

The Radeon RX 590 Is Finally Running Strong On Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

It took the better part of a month since the debut of the latest Polaris hardware refresh, but with the latest AMDGPU kernel driver patch posted today, the AMD Radeon RX 590 now appears to be in great shape with the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack for Linux.

A few days ago I wrote about a few kernel patches and new firmware binaries for getting the Radeon RX 590 working on Linux. That was the case only to find that under 3D load, there were GPU hangs. With a new patch posted today, those hangs under load are corrected.

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Also: A Final Batch Of DRM-Misc-Next Updates Before Linux 4.21

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Linux Gaming Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While we have delivered many Linux benchmarks the past number of weeks from the GeForce RTX 2070 and GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, up until recently we didn't have access to the RTX 2080 that is the card positioned between those two current consumer Turing graphics cards. In kicking off our RTX 2080 Linux benchmarking, here is a look at the Linux gaming performance compared to an assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards tested on Ubuntu Linux while in the days ahead will be the OpenCL/CUDA tests and more.

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It Looks Like We Won't See An Open-Source NVIDIA Vulkan Driver This Year (Nouveau)

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Graphics/Benchmarks

While at the start of the year Nouveau developers expressed their hope to create a basic open-source NVIDIA Vulkan driver this calendar year, it doesn't look like it's panning out.

There is work certainly progressing in that direction thanks to Red Hat's Karol Herbst and others working on SPIR-V/compute support for Nouveau, which is the fundamental IR also needed by Vulkan. In fact, back in August Karol Herbst did publish some early bits of a Nouveau Vulkan driver, but there hasn't been any direct public activity to report on since that point.

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Graphics: AMD, Vulkan and ARM

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Linux 4.20 Picks Up 6 x 4K Display Support For Vega 20, Initial RX 590 Support Fixes

    Usually this late into a current Linux kernel development cycle the DRM graphics driver fixes don't tend to be too notable, but that's certainly not the case with today's batch of AMDGPU and TTM fixes sent off to the DRM tree.

    Highlights of the AMDGPU Linux kernel driver fixes today come down to:

    - Support for being able to drive six 4K displays with the upcoming Vega 20 GPUs... Up until now Vega 20 would top out at 4 x 4K displays due to the minimum dcf clock value set, but now that's been corrected with a one line patch that will allow up to six 4K displays to function with the upcoming Radeon Instinct Vega 20 products.

  • VK_KHR_shader_float_controls and Mesa support

    Khronos Group has published two new extensions for Vulkan: VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and VK_KHR_shader_float_controls. In this post, I will talk about VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which is the extension I have been implementing on Anvil driver, the open-source Intel Vulkan driver, as part of my job at Igalia. For information about VK_KHR_shader_float16_int8 and its implementation in Mesa, you can read Iago’s blogpost.

    The Vulkan Working Group has defined a new extension VK_KHR_shader_float_controls, which allows applications to query and override the implementation’s default floating point behavior for rounding modes, denormals, signed zero and infinity. From the Vulkan application developer perspective, VK_shader_float_controls defines a new structure called VkPhysicalDeviceFloatControlsPropertiesKHR where the drivers expose the supported capabilities such as the rounding modes for each floating point data type, how the denormals are expected to be handled by the hardware (either flush to zero or preserve their bits) and if the value is a signed zero, infinity and NaN, whether it will preserve their bits.

  • ARM Posts New "Komeda" Linux DRM/KMS Display Driver

    ARM developers have posted their first public patches for the new "Komeda" display driver for the Linux kernel that offers DRM/KMS integration.

    ARM's Komeda display driver is for supporting the D71 and later display processors. The Mali D71 is a big redesign to ARM's display IP that is more modularized and offers new functionality compared to their older display processors. Those unfamiliar with the D71 hardware and features but curious can learn more via community.arm.com.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 & FreeBSD 12.0 Performance Benchmarks, Comparison Against Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Coincidentally the DragonFlyBSD 5.4 release and FreeBSD 12.0 lined up to be within a few days of each other, so for an interesting round of benchmarking here is a look at DragonFlyBSD 5.4 vs. 5.2.2 and FreeBSD 12.0 vs. 11.2 on the same hardware as well as comparing those BSD operating system benchmark results against Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, Clear Linux, and CentOS 7 for some Linux baseline figures.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 introduced NUMA optimizations, upgrading from GCC5 to GCC8 as the base compiler, HAMMER2 file-system improvements, and many other enhancements built up over the past half-year.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more