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Graphics/Benchmarks

18-GPU NVIDIA/AMD Linux Comparison Of BioShock: Infinite

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The results in this article contain more NVIDIA GeForce Linux results than what was shared last week when showing how BioShock Infinite runs much faster with the NVIDIA Linux driver than AMD Catalyst. The NVIDIA test line-up today spans from the GeForce GTX 550 Ti Fermi to the newest GeForce GTX 960/970/980 Maxwell graphics cards.

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Radeon DisplayPort MST Queued For Linux 4.1

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The Linux 4.1 kernel will feature support for Radeon DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport so that this open-source AMD Linux graphics driver can work with the latest high resolution DP displays and modern laptop docking stations.

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Older: HDMI CEC Framework Revived For The Linux Kernel

A Look At BCache vs. LVM Cache For HDD+SSD Linux Systems

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

For those thinking about potentially running a Linux system with a combination of SSD and HDD so that the solid-state drive would be able to act as a performance cache for commonly used data, BCache and LVM-cache/dmcache are two of the commonly used solutions.

For those interested in LVM Cache or BCache, Fedora developer Vratislav Podzimek has written a lengthy blog post comparing these two hybrid caching solutions for Linux -- including setup procedures and steps for Fedora users.

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GTC 2015: Nvidia Digits DevBox is a Linux-powered mini supercomputer

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

NVIDIA HAS ANNOUNCED Digits DevBox, a Linux-powered mini supercomputer, at its annual GPU Technology Conference (GTC) in California today.

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Linux Performance Analysis: New Tools and Old Secrets

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

At the last USENIX/LISA conference, I gave a talk on new Linux performance tools: my open source perf-tools collection. These use existing kernel frameworks, ftrace and perf_events, which are built in to most Linux kernel distributions by default, including the Linux cloud instances I analyze at Netflix.

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A look at Android 5.1: speed, security, tweaks

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks

5.1 also makes many small interface changes, documented in the gallery above. Notification and volume controls have seen improvement, and the OS has been tweaked and polished all over.

In addition, 5.1 brings built-in support for dual SIMs (previously something OEMs had to add) and HD Voice support.

Android 5.1 is one of the smaller minor version Android updates, down there with versions 4.2 and 4.3. But it brings a few nice changes and thankfully seems to solve many of the Nexus 6 performance problems.

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Raspberry Pi 2: Raspbian (ARMv6) v Linaro (ARMv7) - Benchmarking

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation make it pretty clear that Raspbian is the recommended operating system for the Raspberry Pi series of computers. Most of the Foundation's documentation and support directs users to Raspbian. The downloads section of their website does list other operating system images. But there are many more images available, and one really piqued my curiosity; a Ubuntu 14.10 / Linaro 15.01 "developer" image. Unlike Raspbian, this image is compiled for ARMv7/armhf.

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X.Org Server 1.17 Makes It Into Ubuntu 15.04

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

X.Org Server 1.17 has made it into Ubuntu 15.04.

While Mir will power the Ubuntu Touch devices, X.Org Server 1.17.1 will be used as the default desktop display server for this next Ubuntu Linux release due out in May. Xorg-server 1.17.1 was uploaded to the Ubuntu Vivid archive yesterday to replace the old 1.16 series.

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Latest Nvidia Shield player runs Android TV on Tegra X1

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks

Nvidia’s $199 STB version of Nvidia Shield runs Android TV on a Tegra X1, and boasts 4K video, 50 optimized games, and game streaming from a “Grid” service.

The 2015 set-top box version of the Nvidia Shield follows two earlier models, including 2013’s original handheld Shield game console, now called the Nvidia Shield Portable, which was based on the Nvidia Tegra 4 system-on-chip. Last year, the chip designer-cum-hardware developer released an Nvidia Shield Tablet built around a more powerful Tegra K1 SoC with Kepler graphics, and featuring new stylus and WiFi Direct gaming controller.

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Also: NVIDIA 346.47 Linux Drivers Launched with Support for New GPUs

openSUSE Tumbleweed vs. Manjaro vs. Debian 8.0 vs. Fedora 21 vs. Ubuntu 14.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The latest Linux benchmarks for your viewing pleasure are a comparison of five Linux distributions tested on the new Intel Core i3 Broadwell NUC with a variety of performance tests.

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Most Secure Operating Systems, VPN for GNU/Linux, and Latest GNU/Linux FUD

  • What’s the most secure operating system?
    Linux has a family of different free versions (known as distributions, or distros) to choose from, based on users’ computer skills. If you’re just getting started, check out Mint or Ubuntu. And because Linux is open-source, users can make copies of modified systems and give them away to friends in need.
  • Choose the Right VPN for Linux in 2019
  • Cryptomining campaign pulls new ‘Linux Rabbit’ malware out of its black hat [Ed: No, it's not ‘Linux Rabbit’ but ‘Weak Password Rabbit’; calling it Linux is rather misleading, distracts from the real problem.]
  • Linux malware: is it so hard to get it right? [Ed: Recognising Catalin Cimpaun for what he really is (and has always been): a clickbaiting troll. For CBS to employ him for ZDNet says a lot about the agenda.]
    Once again, so-called security researchers and tech writers have combined to provide misinformation about trojanised SSH scripts which can be run on a Linux server after said server is compromised through a brute-force attack and root status attained. And they call it Linux malware! Security firm ESET and ZDNet writer Catalin Cimpanu have both got it wrong in the past — the latter on numerous occasions as he simply does not seem to understand anything about the Linux security model — but both continue to persist in trying to pursue the topic. ESET has gone in the wrong direction on torrent files and clients too. Arguably, there is reason to do so: Linux and malware in the same headline do still serve as some kind of clickbait. [...] Cimpanu was more descriptive, but again made the same fundamental mistake. Malware can be created for any operating system, but the crucial question is how do you get it onto that system? [...] Cimpanu's former employer, Bleeping Computer, was also prone to screw-ups of this nature. Here is the editor of Bleeping Computer, Lawrence Abrams, expounding on ransomware targeting Linux servers. But then Bleeping Computer is a relatively small operation. One would have thought that ZDNet, which has tons of resources, would have a little more editorial quality control.

Most Secure Operating Systems, VPN for GNU/Linux, and Latest GNU/Linux FUD

  • What’s the most secure operating system?
    Linux has a family of different free versions (known as distributions, or distros) to choose from, based on users’ computer skills. If you’re just getting started, check out Mint or Ubuntu. And because Linux is open-source, users can make copies of modified systems and give them away to friends in need.
  • Choose the Right VPN for Linux in 2019
  • Cryptomining campaign pulls new ‘Linux Rabbit’ malware out of its black hat [Ed: No, it's not ‘Linux Rabbit’ but ‘Weak Password Rabbit’; calling it Linux is rather misleading, distracts from the real problem.]
  • Linux malware: is it so hard to get it right? [Ed: Recognising Catalin Cimpaun for what he really is (and has always been): a clickbaiting troll. For CBS to employ him for ZDNet says a lot about the agenda.]
    Once again, so-called security researchers and tech writers have combined to provide misinformation about trojanised SSH scripts which can be run on a Linux server after said server is compromised through a brute-force attack and root status attained. And they call it Linux malware! Security firm ESET and ZDNet writer Catalin Cimpanu have both got it wrong in the past — the latter on numerous occasions as he simply does not seem to understand anything about the Linux security model — but both continue to persist in trying to pursue the topic. ESET has gone in the wrong direction on torrent files and clients too. Arguably, there is reason to do so: Linux and malware in the same headline do still serve as some kind of clickbait. [...] Cimpanu was more descriptive, but again made the same fundamental mistake. Malware can be created for any operating system, but the crucial question is how do you get it onto that system? [...] Cimpanu's former employer, Bleeping Computer, was also prone to screw-ups of this nature. Here is the editor of Bleeping Computer, Lawrence Abrams, expounding on ransomware targeting Linux servers. But then Bleeping Computer is a relatively small operation. One would have thought that ZDNet, which has tons of resources, would have a little more editorial quality control.

Now you can run nginx on Wasmjit on all POSIX systems

Wasmjit team announced last week that you can now run Nginx 1.15.3, a free and open source high-performance HTTP server and reverse proxy, in user-space on all POSIX system. Wasmjit is a small embeddable WebAssembly runtime that can be easily ported to most environments. It primarily targets a Linux kernel module capable of hosting Emscripten-generated WebAssembly modules. It comes equipped with a host environment for running in user-space on POSIX systems. This allows you to run WebAssembly modules without having to run an entire browser. Getting Nginx to run had been a major goal for the wasmjit team ever since its first release in late July. Read more

Nextcloud 15 goes social, enforces 2FA and gives you a new generation real-time document editing

Nextcloud 2018 ends the year with a big announcement: Nextcloud 15 is here! This release marks a big step forward for communication and collaboration with others in a secure way, introducing... Read more