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Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 10.3.2 Has A Couple Bug-Fixes

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

For those living by stable Mesa releases rather than the exciting, bleeding-edge Mesa Git code for open-source Linux graphics drivers, Mesa 10.3.2 is available this Friday night.

Mesa 10.3.2 has fixes for Nouveauy's GM107 Maxwell and GK110 support, a handful of Intel DRI driver fixes, and also a few R600g/RadeonSI driver fixes.

Mesa stable users interested in learning more can find the 10.3.2 release announcement by Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager. For those after the latest Git developments, Mesa 10.4 will be declared stable in December.

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Mesa 10.4 Might Re-Enable HyperZ For R600g/RadeonSI

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The performance of the upcoming Mesa 10.4 might be better out-of-the-box for R600g and RadeonSI Gallium3D driver users if a new patch is accepted to re-enable HyperZ by default.

HyperZ is an important performance-boosting feature that's been available in the open-source AMD Linux drivers for years but tends to often get flipped on/off every once in a while when bugs are reported about HyperZ causing corruption or stability problems by users. Currently in Mesa Git the HyperZ support is disabled by default in the R600g and RadeonSI drivers.

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6-Way Ubuntu 14.10 Linux Desktop Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

In celebration of Ubuntu 14.10's Utopic Unicorn release today, here's some fresh benchmarks of one of the most requested topics: 2D/3D benchmarks of different desktop environments. In this article is a look at six of the popular desktop offerings found in Ubuntu 14.10.

The desktops tested in their near-final state on Ubuntu 14.10 x86_64 included Unity 7.3.1, KDE 4.14.1, Xfce 4.10, LXDE 0.6.2, Openbox 3.5.2, and GNOME Shell 3.12.2. Tests are also being done of Kubuntu's PPA for Plasma 5 packages, but those results will be saved for its own article. Testing the MATE packages in Ubuntu 14.10 was also attempted but when logging into the MATE session it was endlessly spawning a bunch of new windows and just wasn't working right at least in the configuration attempted.

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Ubuntu 14.10 XMir System Compositor Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 14.10 "Utopic Unicorn" due for release today, here's some benchmarks showing how the standard Unity 7 desktop on Ubuntu 14.10 is comparing to the still-experimental Unity System Compositor and using XMir for running traditional Linux OpenGL games.

From a standard Intel Core i7 Haswell system with HD Graphics I ran benchmarks with the development snapshot of Ubuntu Utopic as of yesterday to see how well the stock Unity 7.3.1 environment is comparing to when it's run with unity-system-compositor installed and using Mir support with XMir for running a variety of standard OpenGL benchmarks as well as some 2D X11 benchmarks.

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Mesa 10.4 Tentatively Planned For Early December

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager, has issued a straw-man proposal to release Mesa 10.4 in early December.

In sticking to the three month release cadence of Mesa, Emil is proposing the Mesa 10.4 feature freeze and release candidate for 14 November with new release candidates to come weekly until the official release. Emil is tentatively thinking about the Mesa 10.4 release for 5 December.

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Btrfs RAID HDD Testing On Ubuntu Linux 14.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Ubuntu

With the Btrfs file-system continuing to stabilize while still adding more functionality and is generating continued interest from more Linux distributions and other open-source projects, I've found it time to run some fresh Btrfs RAID benchmarks to see how the next-generation Linux file-system is performing with its built-in RAID handling.

The Btrfs file-system offers built-in support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, and RAID 10 (1+0) modes though the support for RAID 5/6 is still considered most experimental. Besides RAID, a single Btrfs file-system can span multiple devices to yield a larger file-system. In this basic Btrfs RAID benchmarking from Ubuntu 14.10, I used two identical hard drives and tested Btrfs without RAID and then in RAID 0 and RAID 1 modes. For a separate article I'm also working on a RAID 0/1/5/6/10 comparison using for solid-state drives, which should be much more interesting, so just take this article as an introduction.

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Ubuntu 14.10 Linux 32-bit vs. 64-bit Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

Given yesterday's story about Ubuntu 16.04 LTS potentially being the last 32-bit release if that proposal goes through, and given the number of people still running 32-bit Linux distributions on Intel/AMD hardware that is 64-bit capable, here's some fresh x86 vs. x86_64 benchmarks using Ubuntu 14.10.

Using Ubuntu 14.10 with the latest daily development ISOs today -- just ahead of this week's official Utopic Unicorn debut -- I did clean installs of both x86 and x86_64 flavors and carried out the same benchmarks with the same settings. Using the open-source Phoronix Test Suite automated benchmark framework made all testing easy and effortless.

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NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Since last month's Linux review of the GeForce GTX 980 as NVIDIA's newest high-end GPU powered by their Maxwell architecture, many Phoronix readers have been requesting Ubuntu Linux tests of the GTX 970 too. I've now got my hands on an EVGA GeForce GTX 970 and am putting it through its paces today.

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OpenGL Preview Benchmarks For NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 970

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For those anxious to see how well the GeForce GTX 970, NVIDIA's new high-end, Maxwell-based graphics card will perform under Linux, here's some preview benchmarks.

As outlined yesterday, the GTX 970 Linux benchmarking is currently happening following my GeForce GTX 980 Linux review from a few weeks ago. The GTX 970 Linux testing is going well and the full review will be published in the next few days.

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AMD's Radeon R9 285 On Linux Offers Good OpenCL Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In complementing this week's Linux review of the AMD Radeon R9 285 and follow-up articles with some extra GPU scaling tests and Catalyst AI Linux benchmarks, here's some more OpenCL R9 285 "Tonga" performance numbers under Ubuntu compared to what was shared in the original Linux review.

For those interested I ran some more OpenCL benchmarks of the Radeon R9 285 with the fglrx 14.30 series driver on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with the Linux 3.15 kernel against an assortment of other NVIDIA/AMD graphics cards as used in these recent Linux hardware reviews.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.