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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver

    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver.

    The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.

  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!

    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Kernel Backports and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • [Older] Backports and long-term stable kernels
  • What’s New in Wayland and Weston 1.12?

    The Wayland core protocol documentation has received numerous refinements to improve its clarity and consistency. Along with this, many blank areas of the protocol documentation have been fleshed out.

    A new wl_display_add_protocol logger API provides a new, interactive way to debug requests; along with this are new APIs for examining clients and their resources. This is analogous to using WAYLAND_DEBUG=1, but more powerful since it allows run time review of log data such as through a UI view.

    There have been improvements to how the protocol XML scanner handles version identification in protocol headers. This enables better detection and fallback handling when compositors and clients support differt versions of their protocols.

  • XDC2016 Wraps Up After Many Wayland, X.Org & Mesa Discussions

    The 2016 X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2016) wrapped up Friday in Helsinki, Finland. Here is a summary of the major happenings for those that may have missed it or didn't yet watch the video streams.

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 2D Rendering On X11 Remains Barely Faster Than CPU Rendering

    In addition to being the organizer of XDC2016, Martin Peres also participated in several presentations at this week's conference in Helsinki. One of these pesentations by Martin was concerning 2D X.Org acceleration.

    Martin basically presented on that rendering 2D on a modern X.Org Server is barely faster than CPU rendering, unless compositing. While being barely faster, it consumes more power than CPU-only rendering. But the good news is that more and more software is moving away from X-based rendering.

    With the next GTK+ release there will be the GTK Scene Kit, Qt5 already has changed its renderer, and other projects are moving over to purely CPU-based rendering or GPU rendering with projects like Servo's WebRender, Google's Skia, and the new Intel FastUIDraw project.

  • Don't Expect An Open-Source NVIDIA Vulkan Driver Anytime Soon
  • AMD's DAL Was Just Presented At XDC2016, Still Not Clear When It Will Be Mainlined

    Harry Wentland of AMD just presented at the XDC2016 conference about DAL, the big Display Abstraction Layer code-base, which many AMD Linux users have been waiting to see merged in order to have Polaris audio support and this is one of the stepping stones for seeing FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync and other modern display capabilities.

    We have been covering DAL for months since AMD open-sourced it and since then they've been trying to clean it up, remove some redundancies compared to what core DRM offers, etc. DAL is a big piece of the puzzle that's left for getting mainlined so the AMDGPU open-source kernel driver can be closer to feature parity with the closed-source driver and what's provided on Windows.

  • LunarG's Vulkan Sample Tutorials Is Easy For Learning This New Graphics API

Phoronix Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • More AMD PowerPlay Fixes Queued For Linux 4.9
  • The Open-Source Intel Vulkan Linux Driver's Anatomy

    Intel Open-Source Technology Center developer Jason Ekstrand presented earlier today at XDC2016 with a presentation entitled "The Anatomy of a Vulkan Driver" where he covers how he and fellow Intel developers brought up the first open-source Vulkan driver and had it ready for launch-day when Khronos formally unveiled the specification earlier this year.

    The early part of the presentation will be boring to anyone who frequently reads Phoronix with the dozens of articles I've written since February concerning progress on the Intel Vulkan driver, Vulkan itself, etc. The early part of the presentation just provides a basic overview of what is Vulkan, the need for Vulkan, etc etc... But the latter half of the presentation is what's interesting when he talks more about the design decisions, how he and basically three Intel developers brought up this driver (along with the support of many other Intel developers), and other commentary surrounding the Intel Linux Vulkan driver's design.

  • SPV_KHR_shader_ballot Is The First Cross-Vendor SPIR-V Extension
  • Nouveau 1.0.13 X.Org Driver Released

    The latest stable release of the Nouveau X.Org driver is now available for users of this open-source NVIDIA DDX component in conjunction with the Nouveau DRM kernel driver.

    The xf86-video-nouveau 1.0.12 release happened nine months ago so there are some changes that came together in that tine, but then again the most interesting innovations in the open-source Linux graphics stack fall outside the DDX drivers the past few years. In total since the v1.0.12 release were just seven commits.

Phoronix on Graphics

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Wayland Rising

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • How Google's Android Runtime On Chrome OS Uses Wayland, DRM

    Google developer David Reveman presented at this morning's XDC2016 conference in Finland about the Android Runtime for Chrome making use of Wayland (ARC++) and how the rest of its graphics stack looks for running Android programs on Chrome OS.

    For rendering with ARC++, Gralloc and the OpenGL ES driver are using the Direct Rendering Manager, applications have full access to OpenGL ES, and there are support for other rendering APIs. Compositing with ARC++ is handled by the Android HWComposer and then surfaces are forwarded to Chrome for compositing with the rest of Chrome OS' user-interface.

  • Wayland 1.12 Next-Gen Linux Display Server Officially Released with Many Goodies

    Today, September 21, 2016, Bryce Harrington has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability of the Wayland 1.12.0 display server for GNU/Linux operating systems, along with the Weston 1.12.0 compositor.

    Development for Wayland 1.12 and Weston 1.12 started exactly a month ago when the first Alpha build was seeded to public testers, and it already contained many of the new functionalities and improvements implemented in this final build we can install today on our GNU/Linux distributions.

Phoronix Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • ARB_ES3_2_compatibility Turned On For Intel Broadwell And Newer

    The Intel Mesa OpenGL driver now exposes the ARB_ES3_2_compatibility extension.

    The Intel i965 Mesa DRI driver has already supported the necessary extensions for OpenGL ES 3.2 support while this ARB_ES3_2_compatibility extension signifies that features found in GLES 3.2 but missing from OpenGL 4.5 are present in the desktop GL driver. This extension makes it easier for bringing mobile OpenGL ES programs to the desktop.

  • Southern Islands Support Will Come To AMDGPU On Linux 4.9

    One month after the first AMDGPU feature pull of new functionality for DRM-Next to in turn land in Linux 4.9, the second feature pull request has now been sent out and it presents experimental Southern Islands (GCN 1.0) support for AMDGPU.

  • Fun Friday For RadeonSI: Laying 64-Bit Integers, ARB_query_buffer_object
  • Windows-DRI Extension Added For X.Org Server 1.19

    In continuation of yesterday's article about Mesa Gets Improved For Running On Windows With Cygwin, the Windows-DRI extension has landed in the X.Org Server code-base.

    This is about improving the OpenGL/GLX support on Windows in a similar manner to the X.Org Server on Mac OS X, with the primary benefactor to this being applications running under Cygwin. See yesterday's article for some more details.

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