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Graphics/Benchmarks

DragonFlyBSD Continues Squeezing More Performance Out Of AMD's Threadripper 2990WX

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Graphics/Benchmarks

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 should be a really great release if you are a BSD user and have an AMD Threadripper 2 box, particularly the flagship Threadripper 2990WX 32-core / 64-thread processor.

The project leader of this long ago fork from FreeBSD, Matthew Dillon, has been quite outspoken about the Threadripper 2990WX since he purchased one earlier this summer. This prolific BSD developer has been praising the performance out of the Threadripper 2990WX since he got the system working on the current DragonFlyBSD 5.3 development builds.

Since getting DragonFlyBSD running on the Threadripper 2 hardware in August, he's routinely been making performance tuning optimizations to DragonFly's kernel to benefit the 2990WX given its NUMA design.

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Graphics: Mesa, DisplayPort's Forward Error Correction and New Driver From NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa Vulkan Drivers Move Ahead With PCI Bus Info, Calibrated Timestamps

    With this weekend's release of Vulkan 1.1.88 stealing the show was the Vulkan transform feedback capability to allow projects like DXVK to support Direct3D's Stream Output functionality. But besides VK_EXT_transform_feedback, there are other extensions also being worked on for Mesa ANV / RADV Vulkan driver coverage.

  • Intel DRM Linux Driver Working On DisplayPort Forward Error Correction

    DisplayPort's Forward Error Correction (FEC) is part of the specification since DP 1.4 and is for ensuring reliable, error-free video transport. Forward Error Correction allows for correcting link errors and a "glitch-free visual experience" by using a Reed-Solomon parity/correction check. The DisplayPort sink can detect and correct any small errors in the compressed video stream.

  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Linux Benchmarks Will Be Coming

    NVIDIA's embargo for reviews on the GeForce RTX 2070 graphics cards has now expired ahead of the expected retail availability on Wednesday.

  • NVIDIA 410.66 Linux Driver Released With RTX 2070 Support, Vulkan Ray-Tracing, Etc

    NVIDIA has released the 410.66 Linux graphics driver today as their first stable release in the 410 series and comes with support for the new GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card.

    The main addition to the NVIDIA 410 Linux driver series is the initial Turing GPU support with the GeForce RTX 2070/2080 graphics cards. Besides enabling Turing support, the NVIDIA 410 driver has initial RTX ray-tracing support with Vulkan. The NVIDIA driver ships new libnvidia-rtcore.so and libnvidia-cbl.so libraries for this ray-tracing functionality. The OptiX ray-tracing engine is also bundled as libnvoptix.so.

AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Arriving earlier this month was a Dell PowerEdge R7425 server at Phoronix that was equipped with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors, 512GB of RAM, and 20 Samsung 860 EVO SSDs to make for a very interesting test platform and our first that is based on a dual EPYC design with our many other EPYC Linux benchmarks to date being 1P. Here is a look at the full performance capabilities of this 64-core / 128-thread server compared to a variety of other AMD EPYC and Intel Xeon processors while also doubling as an initial look at the performance of these server CPUs on Ubuntu 18.10.

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Graphics: CodeXL, X.Org Server, FreeDesktop.org and SIMD32

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • CodeXL 2.6 is released!

    For current users of CodeXL, this new release may look and feel a little different. The AMD Developer Tools team has been busy working on many new tools, some of which replicate functionality found in older versions of CodeXL. Thus, to limit confusion for our users, we have removed several major components from CodeXL.

  • AMD CodeXL 2.6 Advances GPU Profiling, Static Analysis & GPU Debugging

    But what is found within CodeXL 2.6 for GPU developers are the GPU profiling features, static analysis features, and GPU debugging features.

  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.20.2

    Lots of bugfixes all over the map. Thanks to all for testing and patches!

  • X.Org Server 1.20.2 Released With A Bunch Of Bug Fixes

    It's almost been a half-year already since the release of the long delayed X.Org Server 1.20, but with no signs of X.Org Server 1.21 releasing soon, xorg-server 1.20.2 was announced today as the latest stable point release.

  • FreeDesktop.org Might Formally Join Forces With The X.Org Foundation

    FreeDesktop.org is already effectively part of X.Org given the loose structure of FreeDesktop.org, the key members/administrators being part of both projects, and FreeDesktop.org long being the de facto hosting platform from the X.Org Server to Mesa and much more. But now they may be officially joining forces.

    As a formality, the X.Org Foundation is seeking to change their foundation's by-laws to reflect that the X.Org Foundation shall also "Support free and open source projects through the freedesktop.org infrastructure. For projects outside the scope [of the X.Org Foundation] support extends to project hosting only."

  • Experimental Patches For Using SIMD32 Fragment Shaders With Intel's Linux Driver

    Existing Intel graphics hardware already supports SIMD32 fragment shaders and the Intel open-source Linux graphics driver has supported this mode for months, but it hasn't been enabled. That though is in the process of changing.

    Since June the Intel Mesa driver's fragment shader code has supported the SIMD32 mode supported by the past number of generations of Intel graphics hardware, but it hasn't actually been turned on. That enabling wasn't done over not having the heuristics in place for determining when to enable it over the other code paths.

Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance Against Ubuntu 18.10, Fedora 29

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As the latest of our benchmarks using the newly re-released Microsoft Windows 10 October 2018 Update, here are benchmarks of this latest Windows 10 build against seven different Linux distributions on the same hardware for checking out the current performance of these operating systems.

For this latest Linux OS benchmarking comparison against Windows, the following platforms were tested:

- The Windows 10 April 2018 release as the previous major milestone of Windows 10.

- The newest Windows 10 October 2018 build as the latest Windows 10 build from Microsoft.

- OpenSUSE Tumbleweed as the openSUSE rolling-release distribution that as of testing was on the Linux 4.18.12 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.14, Mesa 18.1.7, and GCC 8.2.1 atop an XFS home file-system with Btrfs root file-system (the default partitioning scheme).

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Graphics: NVIDIA's New Vulkan Driver and Intel's Vulkan Driver Is Working On A NIR Cache

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 396.54.09 Vulkan Driver Released With Transform Feedback, Intel ANV Gets TF Too

    Today is certainly a very exciting day in the Vulkan space.

    Following the release of Vulkan 1.1.88 that brings initial support for the much anticipated transform feedback support, to help projects like DXVK and VKD3D for mapping Direct3D (or even OpenGL) atop Vulkan, there has been a slew of driver updates.

  • anv: Add a NIR cache

    This patch series adds a simple NIR shader cache that sits right after spirv_to_nir and brw_preprocess_nir and before linking. This should help alleviate some of the added overhead of link-time optimization since most of the NIR-level optimization is now cached prior to linking.

  • Intel's Vulkan Driver Is Working On A NIR Cache

    As a possible performance win, Jason Ekstrand as the lead developer of the Intel ANV open-source Vulkan driver has been developing a NIR cache.

Release of DXVK 0.90 and Vulkan API News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Hot on the heels of the latest release of the Vulkan API, DXVK 0.90 is now out with Stream Output support

    DXVK [GitHub], the awesome Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation that's used in Wine and Steam Play's Proton has just put out version 0.90 after the latest release of the Vulkan API.

  • DXVK 0.90 Released With Stream Output, Several Game Fixes

    Hot off merging transform feedback into DXVK for supporting Direct3D 11 Stream Output, Philip Rebohle released DXVK 0.90.

    The main addition with DXVK 0.90 is the support for Stream Output via Vulkan Transform Feedback -- of course, you'll need the updated/patched Vulkan drivers. At this stage this Stream Output support helps games running on Unity Engine, The Witcher 3 (especially with NVIDIA Hairworks support), Final Fantasy XV, Quake Champions, Overwatch, and other games with different rendering issues or missing elements.

  • DXVK Already Lands Vulkan Transform Feedback Support, RADV Posts Patches

    With the newly-announced Vulkan 1.1.88 that brings VK_EXT_transform_feedback, the DXVK Direct3D-on-Vulkan layer has already implemented the transform feedback support.

    DXVK developer Philip Rebohle working under contract for Valve has already merged his transform feedback implementation into the mainline code-base. He didn't magically write all of the necessary code for Direct3D 11 stream outputs mapped to Vulkan and the like today, but had written it in advance -- presumably thanks to Valve's involvement with the Vulkan working group. This is good news as working out the DXVK transform feedback support prior to firming up the VK_EXT_transform_feedback extension ensured that this new extension would work out for DXVK's needs.

  • Vulkan 1.1.88 Released With Transform Feedback As A Big Win For VKD3D / DXVK

    Vulkan 1.1.88 is out this morning and it's an exciting Vulkan update. Say hello to Vulkan transform feedback!

New Wine With Graphics Work/Latest Changes, NVIDIA's GPU Work, and Intel's Work on Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Wine Announcement
  • Wine 3.18 Brings FreeType Subpixel Font Rendering, Wine Console DPI Scaling

    A new bi-weekly Wine development release is out for those wanting to try the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience (outside of Steam Play / Proton) or running other Windows applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    The key features of Wine 3.18 include sub-pixel font rendering in conjunction with FreeType 2.8.1+, support for the OAEP algorithm within the RSA encryption code, array marshalling fixes in DCOM, improved DPI scaling for the Wine console, and various bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA Accelerates Server Workloads with RAPIDS GPU Software

    GPUs, or Graphics Process Units, are somewhat of a misnomer in the modern age for many of the applications where there are deployed. While GPUs are an important component for graphics, high-end gaming and design, they are also being widely used to accelerate High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) workloads.

    This week, NVIDIA announced its RAPIDS open source software for GPUs, alongside multiple partners, including Oracle, HPE and IBM.

  • Intel Whiskey Lake Support Formally Added To Mesa 18.3

    The recently posted patch for Intel Whiskey Lake support in Mesa has now been merged for Mesa 18.3.

    Intel announced Whiskey Lake and Amber Lake in late August. While Intel is usually many months or even years ahead of schedule with their open-source driver enablement for new graphics generations, Whiskey Lake basically comes down to re-branded Coffeelake UHD Graphics... Some of the PCI IDs in fact have already been present in the Intel Linux driver as reserved Coffeelake PCI IDs.

Graphics: Mir, X.Org Foundation, and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Ubuntu's Bring-Up Of NVIDIA's Driver With Mir Continues

    The Ubuntu developers continuing to work on the Mir display server stack have made headway in their NVIDIA driver enablement effort.

    The code isn't yet merged nor even ready to be merged, but they at least have got the NVIDIA proprietary driver working with Mir to the extent that EGL clients are working, rendering is working without major issues, it doesn't regress the stack for the non-NVIDIA drivers, etc.

  • XDC2019 X.Org / Mesa / Wayland Conference To Be Hosted In Montreal

    The X.Org Foundation Board of Directors decided today that their next annual X.Org/Mesa/Wayland conference will be held in Montreal, Canada.

    X.Org decided to head up to Quebec, Canada for next year's X.Org conference after the successful XDC2018 held last month in Spain. Those bidding to be the XDC2019 host city were between Montreal and Hutchinson in Minnesota.

  • AMD Posts Latest Open-Source Linux Patches For FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / VRR

    One of the few features not yet provided by the mainline open-source Radeon Linux graphics driver will soon be crossed off the list... FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync / HDMI Variable Refresh Rate support.

    It's been a heck of a long time coming to say the least, but last month AMD began posting new patches for VRR / Adaptive-Sync / FreeSync for their open-source Linux graphics driver. Part of the reason why it's taken so long getting to this point was reaching a consensus with the Intel Linux graphics driver developers and other Linux DRM stakeholders over the design/properties to use in exposing this functionality to user-space so eventually other Linux graphics drivers can choose to implement this support similarly.

A Look At The Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance With WSL

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Graphics/Benchmarks

As the first of our Linux vs. Windows benchmarks coming around Microsoft's Windows 10 October 2018 Update, today we are exploring the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) performance to see if they have finally managed to improve the I/O performance for this Linux binary compatibility layer and how the WSL performs compared to Ubuntu and Clear Linux.

For those that have missed my previous rounds of Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) benchmarking, this Linux binary compatibility layer for Windows is surprisingly performant for most workloads... Microsoft all around has done a surprisingly good job on WSL with its support and performance. The big exception to the strong WSL performance though has been for I/O workloads struggling a great deal due to WSL needing to track the various meta-data separately, backing the I/O by their long-standing NTFS file-system, and other complications between Linux/Windows I/O handling. But they continue to express they are working on improving the I/O performance and as such I was anxious to see if there are any improvements with this October 2018 Update.

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Today in Techrights

Security: Cracking, Elections and Apache

  • Hack [sic] on 8 adult websites exposes oodles of intimate user data

    A recent [crack] of eight poorly secured adult websites has exposed megabytes of personal data that could be damaging to the people who shared pictures and other highly intimate information on the online message boards. Included in the leaked file are (1) IP addresses that connected to the sites, (2) user passwords protected by a four-decade-old cryptographic scheme, (3) names, and (4) 1.2 million unique email addresses, although it’s not clear how many of the addresses legitimately belonged to actual users.

  • Professors discuss election security, voting systems at panel

    Amid questions of election security and potential system hacking in the upcoming midterm elections, Engineering prof. J. Alex Halderman spoke at the University of Michigan Alumni Center Thursday night about vulnerabilities in U.S. voting systems. Last June, Halderman appeared before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to testify about such.

    [...]

    “If an attack takes place, we won’t necessarily see the physical evidence," Halderman said. "The physical evidence that it took place is a discrepancy between what’s written on a piece of paper and what a computer total of that paper says. Because elections are so complicated, they’re so noisy, because the [crackers] can hide their traces in various ways, we won’t necessarily see when something like this happen for the first time. We've got to be ready.”

  • Apache Access Vulnerability Could Affect Thousands of Applications
    A recently discovered issue with a common file access method could be a major new attack surface for malware authors. Vulnerabilities in Apache functions have been at the root of significant breaches, including the one suffered by Equifax. Now new research indicates that another such vulnerability may be putting thousands of applications at risk. Lawrence Cashdollar, a vulnerability researcher and member of Akamai's Security Incident Response Team, found an issue with the way that thousands of code projects are using Apache .htaccess, leaving them vulnerable to unauthorized access and a subsequent file upload attack in which auto-executing code is uploaded to an application.