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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today

    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12.

    AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.

  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements

    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.

  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git

    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.

This Week's Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 Radeon Performance vs. NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given all the recent performance work that's landed recently in Mesa Git for Mesa 17.1 plus the Linux 4.11 kernel continuing to mature, in this article are some fresh benchmarks of a few Radeon GPUs with Mesa 17.1-dev + Linux 4.11 as of this week compared to some GeForce graphics cards with the latest NVIDIA proprietary driver.

Basically this article is to serve as a fresh look at the open-source Radeon vs. closed-source NVIDIA Linux gaming performance. The Radeon tests were using the Linux 4.11 kernel as of 20 March and the Mesa 17.1-dev code also as of 20 March. The NVIDIA driver used was the 378.13 release. Ubuntu 16.10 was running on the Core i7 7700K test system.

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Vulkan News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Yaakuro shows off SteamVR on Unreal Engine 4 using Vulkan on Linux

    Previously Yaakuro worked to make Unreal Engine 4 work with SteamVR using OpenGL on Linux, but now he's moved onto making it work with Vulkan!

  • Unreal Engine 4 Making Progress On Linux With Vulkan & SteamVR

    Thanks to the work of community UE4 developer Yaakuro, Unreal Engine 4 on Linux with SteamVR support is advancing and can now be used with Vulkan rendering.

    Earlier this month the developer got UE4 with SteamVR on Linux running but using the OpenGL renderer. But today he's shared a video showing off UE4 on Linux SteamVR with Vulkan.

  • Khronos Clarifies That Vulkan Multi-GPU Isn't Limited To Windows 10

    With the big Vulkan 1.0.42 update came a number of new extensions, including for Vulkan multi-GPU/device support. There was some confusion by some that Vulkan's multi-GPU support was limited to Windows 10, but that is not at all the case.

    It appears some confusion came up about Vulkan's multi-GPU support when some Game Developers Conference (GDC17) slides had referenced the Windows Display Driver Model (WDDM). Thus some thought the Vulkan multi-device capabilities were somehow tied to using Windows' WDDM.

More on Radeon Vega

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Vega Changes For Libdrm, Plans For Merging Prior To Kernel Support

    The latest in the hardware enablement work for adding support for the upcoming Radeon RX Vega to the open-source Linux graphics driver are the patches to libdrm for this Mesa DRM library that sits between the DRM kernel drivers and Mesa / xf86-video / other user-space graphics code.

  • More Radeon Vega Work Lands For LLVM 5.0

    Yesterday we saw 100 patches adding Vega support to the Radeon DRM driver as well as 140 patches adding Vega support to RadeonSI Gallium3D. The other big piece of the open-source Linux driver stack for Vega is the AMDGPU LLVM changes.

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Porting Mesa/Libdrm's Build System To Meson Brings Up Controversy

    Last week an independent developer proposed replacing the build system of libdrm -- the DRM library that sits between Mesa and the Linux kernel DRM -- to using the Meson build system as a potential replacement to using Autotools. That has led to another colorful discussion around build systems.

    Dylan Baker's RFC patches can be found on the dri-devel list and the discussion that ensued. He argues that the build system with Meson would be better since it's written in Python, Meson makes use of Ninja rather than CMake, its syntax is arguably simpler, and it's quicker. Dylan found that his build times dropped from 26 seconds to 13 seconds when going from Autotools to Meson. When making use of ccache, the build times dropped from 13 seconds to 2 seconds. He also mentioned he's planning on porting Mesa's Autotools/CMake build system over to Meson.

  • AMD’s Linux GPU patches seven Vega 10s

    These 100 patches add up to 40,000 lines of code and have been sent out today for review. The idea is that AMD will use them as the basis to provide "Vega 10" support within the Linux AMDGPU DRM driver.

  • Seven AMD Vega GPU IDs have appeared in the latest Linux driver release

    More than forty thousand lines of updated code have been sent out with 100 little patches for AMD’s Linux graphics drivers so they can deliver Vega GPU support when the new architecture launches. Inside the latest drivers have appeared seven discrete Vega 10 device IDs.

  • AMD Linux Driver Team Releases Over 100 ADMGPU Driver Patches Including Vega 10, Polaris 12 Support

    More than 100 patches for ADMGPU driver, including some much talked about support for Vega 10, were released by AMD’s Linux driver team yesterday.

Mesa and Radeon RX Vega

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • QEMU Is Interested In Vulkan Guest Support "Vulkan-ize Virgl"

    The QEMU project is hoping for some interested developers to enhance VirGL for better offering OpenGL guest support with QEMU guests and possibly extend it to include Vulkan support.

  • how close to conformant is radv? - airlied
  • AMD Sends Out 100 Patches, Enabling Vega Support In AMDGPU DRM

    100 patches amounting to over fourty thousand lines of code was sent out today for review in order to provide "Vega 10" support within the AMDGPU DRM driver.

    Adding Vega support to AMDGPU is a big task due to all of the changes over Polaris and other recent GPUs. Vega rolls out a new video BIOS interface, lots of new hardware intellectual property, support for video decode using UVD (UVD 7.0), support for video encode using VCE (VCE 4.0), support for 3D via RadeonSI, power management, full display support using DC, and support for SR-IOV virtualization.

  • How The RadeonSI OpenGL Performance Has Evolved From Mesa 11.1 To Mesa 17.1 Git

    For those curious how AMD's RadeonSI Gallium3D driver for GCN GPUs has evolved, here are benchmarks with two graphics cards showing how the RadeonSI Mesa performance has evolved since Mesa 11.1 going back to late 2015.

  • Mesa 17.0.2 Released Along With Mesa 13.0.6

    The second point release is now available to Mesa 17.0.

    Mesa 17.0.2 is shipping this Monday with a dozen fixes to the Intel ANV / Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers, various improvements to the Intel OpenGL driver, and fixes for Nouveau NVC0 and RadeonSI.

Graphics in Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Vulkan, Mir, and Wayland

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Benchmarks Of Many ARM Boards From The Raspberry Pi To NVIDIA Jetson TX2

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For some weekend benchmarking fun, I compared the Jetson TX2 that NVIDIA released this weekend with their ARM 64-bit "Denver 2" CPU cores paired with four Cortex-A57 cores to various other ARM single board computers I have access to. This is looking at the CPU performance in different benchmarks ranging from cheap ~$10 ARM SBCs to the Raspberry Pi to the Jetson TX1 and Jetson TX2.

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