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Graphics/Benchmarks

D9VK 0.40

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • D9VK, the Direct3D9 to Vulkan layer has a huge new 0.40 'Croakacola' release out

    For use with Wine and Steam Play Proton, D9VK is the awesome project based on DXVK which translates Direct3D9 to Vulkan for better performance. A big new release just went out.

    Codenamed Croakacola, D9VK 0.40 is a big one. D9VK can now use more than 4GB VRAM on 32-bit applications/games, with it being noted to help modded Skyrim/Oblivion and obviously more too. There's also now async presentation across all vendors, some "query flushing" improvements, performance fixes for Risen and Legend of the Heroes: Trails of the Sky, bloom rendering fixes for SpinTyres/Mudrunner and other misc updates.

  • D9VK 0.40 Uses Async Present On All Drivers, Various Other Features + Perf Optimizations

    D9VK 0.40 is out today as the latest feature update to this Direct3D 9 over Vulkan translation layer based on DXVK.

    D9VK lead developer Joshua Ashton released version 0.40 today as the "Croakacola" release and it includes some big features like for 32-bit applications to be able to utilize more than 4GB of video RAM, which should help Skyrim, Oblivion, and other games.

Graphics: Mesa 20.0 Development, Mir Work and Radeon's Linux Limits

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 20.0-devel Intel Gallium3D Performance Benchmarks Are Looking Good For Ice Lake

    While the Mesa 20.0 cycle is quite young and still over one month to go until the feature freeze for this next quarterly installment of these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers, it's quite exciting already with the changes building up. In particular, on the Intel side they are still positioning for the Intel Gallium3D driver to become the new default on hardware of generations Broadwell and newer. Here is a quick look at how the Intel Gallium3D performance is looking compared to their legacy "i965" classic OpenGL driver that is the current default.

    As you should already know if you've been reading Phoronix for any real length of time, the new Intel Gallium3D driver is quite competitive and for supported generations is generally now ahead of their classic OpenGL driver. The Intel Gallium3D driver supports OpenGL 4.6 like the i965 driver and the lingering bugs are just being addressed before turning it on as the default Intel OpenGL Linux driver while i965 will be sticking around as the default for Haswell and older.

  • Ubuntu's Mir Display Stack Accomplished A Lot In 2019 For Being Discounted Two Years Ago

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths continues leading the Mir efforts and his team had a very busy 2019 continuing to push along Mir even though it's not featured on the Ubuntu desktop right now is still playing a big role at the company due to IoT use-cases like digital signage. Griffiths provided a look back at Mir in 2019 on Ubuntu Discourse. Here were some of the highlights:

  • AMD releases the Radeon 5500XT

    Now step forward almost six months and the drivers for the 5700 and 5500 lines still don’t exist. OK sure there are drivers for Ubuntu 18.04.03, and ONLY for Ubuntu 18.04.03, nothing newer.

Sabrent Rocket 4.0 NVMe Gen4 Linux Benchmarks Against Other SATA/NVMe SSDs

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Graphics/Benchmarks

When it comes to PCIe 4.0 NVMe SSDs, the drives we have been using are the Corsair Force MP600 that have been working out great for pairing with the newest AMD Ryzen systems. But a Black Friday deal had the Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 PCIe M.2 SSD on sale, so I decided to pick one up to see how it was performing on Ubuntu Linux. Here are benchmarks of the Sabrent Gen4 NVMe SSD, which in the 1TB capacity can be found for $150~170 USD.

The Sabrent 1TB Rocket NVMe 4.0 Gen4 (SB-ROCKET-NVMe4-1TB) features Toshiba BiCS4 96L BGA132 TLC NAND flash memory, Phison PS5016-E16 flash controller, and Sabrent rates its performance for sequential reads up to 5000MB/s and sequential writes up to 4400MB/s. Obviously for hitting those peak performance figures this solid-state drive needs to be installed in a PCI Express 4.0 M.2 slot.

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Dual-GPU support follow-up: NVIDIA driver support

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Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

There were a number of problems with the old detection code in switcheroo-control:
- it required the graphics card to use vga_switcheroo in the kernel, which the NVIDIA driver didn't do
- it could support more than 2 GPUs
- and it didn't really actually know which GPU was going to be the “main” one

And, on top of all that, gnome-shell expected the Mesa OpenGL stack to be used, so it only knew the right environment variables to do that, and only for one secondary GPU.

So we've extended switcheroo-control and its API to do all this.

(As a side note, commenters asked me about the KDE support, and how it would integrate, and it turns out that KDE's code just checks for the presence of a file in /sys, which is only present when vga_switcheroo is used. So I would encourage KDE to adopt the switcheroo-control D-Bus API for this)

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Also: GNOME 3.36 Bringing Better Multi-GPU Handling With Switcheroo-Control, NVIDIA Support

Benchmarking Mozilla's Firefox Performance Over The Past Two Years

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With 2019 quickly drawing to an end, I figured it would be interesting to see how the performance of Mozilla Firefox has been trending over the longer term. So for this article today is a look at the Firefox 57 through Firefox 71 stable performance plus tests of Firefox 72 beta and Firefox 73 alpha all from the same system and using a variety of browser benchmarks.

Going back to Firefox 71 means a look at the performance of this web browser from present back through November 2017. Firefox 57 was the cut-off as Firefox 56 and older was not working with the Selenium / WebDriver interfaces used for automating these browser benchmarks. For all the Firefox releases tested, they were using the official Linux x86_64 binaries from the Mozilla FTP and each time tested in an out-of-the-box configuration with clean profile.

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Benchmark results on mdds multi_type_vector

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Graphics/Benchmarks
LibO

One of the data structures included in mdds, called multi_type_vector, stores values of different types in a single logical vector. LibreOffice Calc is one primary user of this. Calc uses this structure as its cell value store, and each instance of this value store represents a single column instance.

Internally, multi_type_vector creates multiple element blocks which are in turn stored in its parent array (primary array). This primary array maps a logical position of a value to the actual block instance that stores it. Up to version 1.5.0, this mapping process involved a linear search that always starts from the first block of the primary array. This was because each element block, though it stores the size of the block, does not store its logical position. So the only way to find the right element block that intersects the logical position of a value is to scan from the first block then keep accumulating the sizes of the encountered blocks.

The reason for not storing the logical positions of the blocks was to avoid having to update them after shifting the blocks after value insertion, which is quite common when editing spreadsheet documents.

Of course, sometimes one has to perform repeated searches to access a number of element values across a number of element blocks, in which case, always starting the search from the first block, or block 0, in every single search can be prohibitively expensive, especially when the vector is heavily fragmented.

To alleviate this, multi_type_vector provides the concept of position hints, which allows the caller to start the search from block N where N > 0. Most of multi_type_vector’s methods return a position hint which can be used for the next search operation. This allows the caller to chain all necessary search operations in such a way to only scan the primary array once for the entire sequence of search operations. The only prerequisite is that access to the elements occur in perfect ascending order. For the most part, this approach worked quite well.

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Also: Phoronix Test Suite 9.2.1 Released

Mesa 19.3.0 Released

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.3.0 Release Notes / 2019-12-12

    Mesa 19.3.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.3.1.

    Mesa 19.3.0 implements the OpenGL 4.6 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.6. OpenGL 4.6 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver.

    Mesa 19.3.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.3 Released With Big Updates For Intel's Open-Source Drivers, Valve ACO Option

    After a few weeks worth of delays due to blocker bugs the release of Mesa 19.3 is out today as a big end-of-year upgrade to the open-source OpenGL and Vulkan drivers for Linux systems. Intel and AMD Radeon driver changes largely dominate the work as always but there is a growing number of embedded driver changes and other enhancements for this crucial piece to the open-source 3D ecosystem.

Nvidia Linux/BSD Graphics Driver Adds Support for Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD

Coming just three weeks after the Nvidia 440.36 driver, which introduced support for the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card, the Nvidia 440.44 graphics driver is here to add support for the Nvidia Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design graphics card on Linux, BSD, and Solaris systems, as well as support for the __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE environment variable for Vulkan apps on GNU/Linux systems.

The Nvidia 440.44 proprietary graphics driver also improves installation support on Oracle Linux 7.7 systems where the Nvidia kernel module could fail to build with the "unknown type name 'vm_fault_t'" error, and addresses a bug discovered in an error handling path, which could cause a Linux kernel crash while loading the nvidia.ko module.

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AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT Linux Performance

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Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD today is shipping the Radeon RX 5500 XT as the new sub-$200 Navi graphics card. This 7nm graphics card offers 22 compute units, 1408 stream processors, up to 5.6 TFLOPS of compute power, 4GB or 8GB GDDR6 video memory options, and built atop their modern RDNA architecture and supporting features in common with the RX 5700 series like PCIe 4.0 support. Here is a look at the initial Linux gaming performance of the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT with various gaming benchmarks and Steam Play tests as well.

The Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB version is launching at $169 USD while the Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB version will command $199 USD. These price points put them comparable to the current Radeon RX 580 / 590 retail cards. AMD markets the RX 5500 XT as offering 1.6x the performance-per-Watt of the original Polaris Radeon RX 480 and designed for 1080p gaming to go up against NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card.

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Graphics: AMD, Intel, Vulkan/Flycast and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Publishes Vega 7nm ISA Documentation - 300 More Pages Of GPU Docs

    Beyond AMD's open-source graphics driver stack of the past decade, part of their original open-source plans have also involved providing public (NDA-free) GPU hardware documentation. That has come with time though the documentation drops are not coordinated in-step with code drops. Out today, for example, is the ISA documentation on Vega 7nm.

    Back in 2017 was the timely release of the Vega ISA documentation and earlier this summer was even the RDNA 1.0 ISA documentation but missing out until now was the Vega 7nm ISA documentation.

  • Intel's Iris Gallium3D Driver Continuing To See Performance Optimizations On Mesa 20.0

    With the current Mesa 19.3 there is the Intel Gallium3D driver generally performing much better than their "classic" i965 driver and for Mesa 20.0 it looks to only make more ground as it switches over to this driver by default.

    Beyond the recent build system changes for supporting an Intel Gallium3D default and building it as part of the default x86/x86_64 Gallium3D drivers with hopes of soon flipping the switch for Broadwell and newer, more performance optimizations are still being done.

  • Dreamcast emulator Flycast adds a Vulkan renderer

    There seems to be quite a lot of interest in Vulkan lately, as more projects begin using it. Now we have the Dreamcast emulator Flycast adding Vulkan support.

    In the technical blog post announcing it on the Libretro site, it gives a bit of brief history of the Dreamcast GPU and mentions the usual "less overhead, more reliability and better performance in many cases" when it comes to using Vulkan although it's a lot more complicated to use.

  • NVIDIA have two new Linux drivers available, one stable and one Vulkan Beta

    NVIDIA continue pushing their drivers forwards with two new Linux driver updates available. Let's take a quick look.

    First, the stable 440.44 driver release as part of their long-lived branch. This adds support for the Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design, you can now use the "__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE" environment variable for Vulkan applications and it fixes a few bugs like tearing with a G-SYNC or G-SYNC Compatible monitor when you've got something running directly on a display (like VR).

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 2019-12-13 | Linux Headlines

    Zulip version 2.1 is out, LibreOffice has a new manual, the Linux Foundation announces yet another initiative, and individual talks from the Linux App Summit have hit the web.

  • Intel Releases Cloud-Hypervisor 0.4 As Its Rust-Written VMM Built Off KVM

    Friday marked not only the release of QEMU 4.2 for Linux virtualization but Intel's open-source crew developing the Cloud-Hypervisor as the Rustlang-based VMM built around Linux's KVM and VirtIO interfaces is out with a big feature release. Cloud-Hypervisor took shape this year and has been quick to evolve since its inaugural release in July. Cloud-Hypervisor during its pre-alpha stage is catered to Clear Linux and Ubuntu while also focusing on x86_64 CPU support but AArch64 coverae is said to be coming in the future. Windows 64-bit guest support is also under evaluation.

  • Qubes OS 4.0.2-rc3 has been released!

    We’re pleased to announce the third release candidate for Qubes 4.0.2!

  • History of Java

    Java was first introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1995. The project was started in the lab of Sun Microsystems by James Gosling, Mike Sheridan, Patrick Naughton. There were more people in the team but these three were main. The name of this team was the Green Team. The first version’s name was the Java Alpha Beta version in 1995. Java Development Kit also called JDK was first introduced in 1996. When Sun Microsystems released the first version of Java in 1996, it was called JDK 1.0 and the code name for this project was OAK. The OAK word was taken from the name of OAK Tree. The picture of the OAK tree is shown below.

  • Python 3.7.5 : Django admin shell by Grzegorz Tężycki.

    Today I tested another python package for Django named django-admin-shell.

  • How the community can help your business: People Powered [Ed: Microsoft-leaning propaganda is consistent. Microsoft propaganda and talking points everywhere, every day, even in the "LINUX" section.]
  • Online Forum Members Exploited Weak Credentials To Turn Ring Cameras Against Their Owners

    To add to all the bad news that is Ring camera's life cycle to this point comes the report that a group of malcontents has been exploiting default/weak credentials to gain access to cameras. Joseph Cox has the this-would-be-funny-if-it-weren't-so-scary details at Motherboard.

  • Apple Releases CUPS 2.3.1 To Fix Security Issue + Other Bugs

    Back in August was the release of the very big CUPS 2.3 update that shifted the source code license, added support for IPP Printer presets, added a new utility, and other improvements for this Apple-controlled Unix/Linux printing system. Available now is CUPS 2.3.1 with various fixes.

OSS: Adoption, Creative Commons (CC), Mozilla and LibreOffice

  • Firms Lack Enterprise Open-Source Strategy

    Wall Street’s adoption of open-source development has come to a crossroads, according to recent research published by industry analyst firm Aite Group. In the 28 years since Linus Torvalds released his open-source Linux operating system kernel, it has taken 23 years for the adoption of the development model to gain prominence with financial services institutions, according to Tosha Ellison, director of member success at the Fintech Open Source Foundation as whose organization sponsored the research,

  • Introducing CC Vocabulary, Our New Web Design System

    Over the past few months, we’ve been working on CC Vocabulary, a new open source software project that provides a cohesive design system to unite the web-facing Creative Commons (CC).

  • Pub True [Ed: Mozilla does surveillance on Firefox users, using the popular euphemisms “data science” and “telemetry”]

    I'm ramping up on a project to understand how Firefox retains users. Right now I'm trying to build some context quickly. For example, what's our monthly retention? How about our annual retention? There's a bunch of interesting and nuanced measurement questions that we'll eventually have to answer, but for now I'm just interested in getting some quick back-of-the-envelope numbers.

  • Help our community with social media in various languages and locations!

    Love LibreOffice? Want to help spread the word? And do you speak another language than English? Then we’d appreciate your help! We have lots of community-created LibreOffice accounts on Facebook and Twitter, but some haven’t been updated for a while. The full list is below, with the date the account was last active – if you’re interested in helping to maintain one, join our marketing list and let us know!

Red Hat's Openwashing and IBM Using Red Hat to Sell Proprietary z/OS

  • Tech Marketing the Open Source Way: Lessons from RedHat and GitHub [Ed: Why does Red Hat prop up proprietary software (GitHub) that's owned by Microsoft? What does that say about Red Hat? This openwashing was composed by someone who came from Microsoft Black Duck.]
  • New extensions in IBM z/OS — containerized workloads

    Container frameworks like Docker allow software to be deployed in a modular fashion and provide the foundation for cloud architectures. With the release of container extensions, IBM’s z/OS platform now supports containerized workloads and enables future deployments through orchestration mechanisms like Kubernetes and OpenShift. This allows z/OS to operate more seamlessly with Linux-based open source workloads that require access to local mainframe resources and subsystems.

This week in KDE: building up to something big

We’ve got some really big things planned and in progress for Plasma 5.18 and Frameworks, and work proceeds smoothly. None of it is quite done yet, but we did land a number of nice bugfixes and user interface polish for issues that have been irritating people for years…and mere days! Read more