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Graphics/Benchmarks

NVIDIA RTX 2060 / 2070 / 2080 SUPER Linux Gaming Performance - 26 GPUs Benchmarked

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Graphics/Benchmarks

We finally have our hands on NVIDIA's current RTX 20 SUPER graphics card line-up and have been putting the RTX 2060/2070/2080 SUPER cards through their paces under Linux. For the first of our long awaited NVIDIA RTX SUPER Linux benchmarks, first up is a look at the Linux gaming performance under a variety of native OpenGL/Vulkan games as well as Steam Play (DXVK+Proton) titles while testing a total of 26 graphics cards this round on the very latest AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce drivers.

Back in July NVIDIA announced the first three RTX SUPER graphics cards as refreshed Turing parts for better positioning against AMD's Radeon RX 5700 Navi line-up. The SUPER variants offer double digit percentage improvements over the earlier Turing cards, the RTX 2060 SUPER has an extra 2GB of GDDR6 video memory (8GB total), and more competitive pricing.

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Mesa 19.2.0 Release

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 19.2.0 Release Notes / 2019.09.25

    Mesa 19.2.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.2.1.

    Mesa 19.2.0 implements the OpenGL 4.5 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.5. OpenGL 4.5 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver.

    Mesa 19.2.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.2 Released With Navi Support, Much Improved Intel Gallium3D

    After a month worth of delays, Mesa 19.2 is now officially available as the latest quarterly feature update to this collection of open-source graphics driver components.

  • Mesa 19.2 released to push open source graphics drivers

    A few months after the last release, Mesa 19.2 is officially available today pushing open source GPU drivers to new heights.

    Since this is a major release, as the developers note you might want to wait for the first point release (19.2.1) to clear up any nuisance issues as it sees more testing.

The Power Efficiency Between Ubuntu 19.04, Clear Linux & openSUSE Tumbleweed With CompuLab's Airtop 3

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With CompuLab's incredibly well engineered Airtop 3 fan-less computer that is built to meet rugged industrial requirements while being loaded with an 8-core/16-thread Xeon CPU, NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 graphics, 64GB of RAM, and NVMe solid-state storage, here is an interesting benchmark comparison of Ubuntu 19.04, Clear Linux, and openSUSE Tumbleweed. Given the interesting system under test, not only is the raw performance being looked at but also the performance-per-Watt / AC power consumption and CPU thermal differences between these Linux operating systems.

The CompuLab Airtop 3 review sample as a reminder was loaded with a Xeon E-2288G 8-core / 16-thread CPU, 64GB of RAM, NVIDIA Quadro RTX 4000 graphics (using the proprietary NVIDIA Linux driver throughout all the tests considering the otherwise poor Turing state for Nouveau), and a 250GB Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD all while being passively cooled.

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Older Broadwell Graphics Performance Is Looking Good With The New Intel Gallium3D OpenGL Linux Driver

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Graphics/Benchmarks

A majority of our benchmarking of Intel's new Gallium3D OpenGL open-source driver is done with various "Gen9" graphics hardware given its proliferation and not yet having any Icelake Gen11 graphics hardware for Linux benchmarking. But with the Iris Gallium3D going back to supporting Broadwell "Gen8" graphics, here is a fresh look at how that oldest supported Intel hardware is working for this new Linux open-source OpenGL driver compared to the current default "i965" Intel OpenGL driver too.

Last week I provided an extensive look at the current Intel Gallium3D driver performance with the common Gen9 graphics hardware and the performance (and overall stability) of this new driver is looking great. It's looking like Intel is still on track for enabling that driver by default in Mesa before the 19.3 release at the end of the calendar year. Following that testing I was curious about Broadwell so I fired up an old Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon laptop.

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Building A Linux HTPC / Storage Server With The SilverStone CS381

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Graphics/Benchmarks

SilverStone recently sent over their CS381 chassis that has proven to be quite a versatile micro-ATX enclosure that can accommodate up to twelve hard drives (eight of which are hot-swappable) all while coming in at just 400 x 225 x 316mm. The SilverStone CS381 could work quite well as a Linux HTPC / DIY Steam Linux gaming living room PC or SOHO file server system with its compact size while offering immense storage potential. Here's more on the SilverStone CS381 and our build with using a Ryzen 5 3400G that is playing well under Linux with an ASUS B450 motherboard.

It's been a while since last taking a look at any SilverStone enclosure, but with continuing to be impressed by their high-end cases over the years, it was exciting to look at the CS381 from their Case Storage Series. The key features of this case are offering support for up to twelve HDD/SSDs, up to a microATX motherboard, and other components while occupying just 30 liters of space. The case can be positioned in either a vertical or horizontal position depending upon the environment and eight of the drives being hot-swappable primes the case for interesting storage server options.

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Graphics: DXVK, Nouveau

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • DXVK 1.4 Released With Updates Against Direct3D 11.4, Other Improvements

    In time for any weekend gaming is the release of DXVK 1.4 as the latest big update to this Direct3D 11 over Vulkan implementation to boost the D3D11 Windows gaming performance with the likes of Wine and Valve's Steam Play (Proton).

    With DXVK 1.4 the Direct3D interfaces have been updated against D3D11.4, the latest D3D11 revision shipped by Windows 10 Build 1903. This update brings new API features but DXVK isn't yet supporting some of the optional features like tiled resources and conservative rasterization.

  • Nouveau Finally Lands SPIR-V Support As Part Of OpenCL Push

    Going back to December 2017 we've been tracking the Red Hat led effort on improving Nouveau's OpenCL compute support that involves adding NIR/SPIR-V support and improvements to the Clover Gallium3D state tracker. To much surprise, this morning the SPIR-V support for this open-source NVIDIA driver was merged for Mesa 19.3.

Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

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Graphics/Benchmarks

At just 37mm tall, the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 is one of the shortest yet quite capable CPU heatsink fans we have seen yet for AMD Ryzen processors.

When looking for a heatsink with a small stature for an AMD APU mini PC build for HTPC / file storage use-cases (more on that build in the next day or two), the Noctua NH-L9a-AM4 fit the criteria and so I went with that given the success with the many Noctua heatsinks we have used over the years. For those potentially interested in the NH-L9a-AM4 for an AMD APU like the new Ryzen 5 3400G or for lower-end Ryzen CPUs, I ran some benchmarks with this cooler.

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Graphics: AMD, GNOME Shell on Wayland and NVIDIA Nsight Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Pushes Back 3rd Gen Threadripper & Ryzen 9 3950X Until November

    While the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors were reportedly on track for launching in October with updates as of a few weeks ago, today AMD announced a slight delay in launching these new processors.

  • AMD have delayed the Ryzen 9 3950X and 3rd generation Threadripper until November

    Today, AMD sent out a brief statement about a delay in their 16 core Ryzen 9 3950X and the 3rd generation Threadripper.

    [...]

    So if you were looking to grab either, keep an eye out in November. Will share any more news when they send it about the expected date and pricing.

  • AMD Sends In Initial Batch Of Fixes To Linux 5.4 - Includes Dali Support

    While just yesterday the big DRM feature pull was sent in for Linux 5.4, AMD has also volleyed out their initial batch of fixes for this next version of the kernel.

    This new AMDGPU pull isn't strictly fixes but as anticipated does include the recently reported Dali APU support. Dali along with Renoir -- also newly-supported in Linux 5.4 -- are some of AMD's 2020 APUs. Dali will be targeting the lower-end of the spectrum it's expected for value mobile/embedded. From the driver code, Dali looks like a newer revved version of the current-gen Picasso APUs. Both Dali and Renoir are based on the Vega architecture.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference 2019, part 2

    Pain points and missing pieces with Wayland, or specifically GNOME Shell:

    GNOME Shell is slower
    Synergy doesn't work(?) - needs to be in the compositor
    With Nvidia proprietary driver, mutter and native Wayland clients get GPU acceleration but X clients don't
    No equivalent to ssh -X. Pipewire goes some way to the solution. The whole desktop can be remoted over RDP which can be tunnelled over SSH.
    No remote login protocol like XDMCP
    No Xvfb equivalent
    Various X utilities that grab hot-keys don't have equivalents for Wayland
    Not sure if all X's video acceleration features are implemented. Colour format conversion and hardware scaling are implemented.
    Pointer movement becomes sluggish after a while (maybe related to GC in GNOME Shell?)
    Performance, in general. GNOME Shell currently has to work as both a Wayland server and an X compositor, which limits the ability to optimise for Wayland.

  • NVIDIA's Nsight Graphics 2019.5 Released With Better Vulkan Coverage

    NVIDIA this week released Nsight Graphics 2019.5 as the newest feature update to their proprietary developer tool for graphics profiling and debugging across multiple APIs.

    The Nsight Graphics 2019.5 release brings support for more than a dozen new Vulkan extensions, a variety of user-interface improvements, compatibility enhancements, and better syntax highlighting.

AMD EPYC 7642 Benchmarks: The Rome 48 Core CPU That Easily Takes On Intel's Xeon Platinum 8280

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 series "Rome" launch at the beginning of August, it's been known how AMD's top-end (aside from the newly-announced EPYC 7H12) EPYC 7742 easily outperforms the Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 in most real-world benchmarks. The EPYC 7742 not only outperforms the Xeon Platinum 8280 in raw performance but also at a significantly lower cost and it gets even better with the EPYC 7642. We have been testing the EPYC 7642 48-core processors and even there the performance is generally ahead of a Xeon Platinum 8280 while being about half the cost of that flagship non-AP Intel Xeon Scalable Cascadelake processor.

Complementing our recent EPYC 7302 and EPYC 7402 benchmarks, today we are focused on the EPYC 7642 as the Rome 48-core / 96-thread processor. This 48 core processor has a 2.3GHz base clock and 3.3GHz boost clock while having 256MB of L3 cache, eight DDR4-3200 memory channels, 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, and other features in common with the EPYC 7742 and other Rome processors. The EPYC 7642 carries a 50MHz base clock speed advantage over the 64 core EPYC 7742 but a 100MHz lower boost clock speed as the principal differences aside from the core/thread count. Both of these CPUs carry a 225 Watt TDP.

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Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

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Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor.

The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively.

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Why we shouldn’t blame ourselves for the Linux desktop’s microscopic marketshare

Well, that was three interesting articles on the same topic on the same day, namely, billionaires. And read in turn they explain exactly why the Linux Desktop is still at such a marginal market share, and why that’s not because we, who work hard on it, are failures who have been doing the wrong thing all the time. It is in the first place policies, bought with money, that allowed people to build monopolies, taxing individuals and so becoming even more rich and powerful. However, what it is about, is the question: why is Bill Gates not in jail for life with all his wealth stripped off? He’s a criminal, and his crime has directly harmed us, the people working on free software, on the Linux Desktop. So, to make things painfully clear: Bill Gates made it so that his company would tax every computer sold no matter whether it ran Windows or not. If a manufacturer wanted to sell computers running Windows, all the computers it sold were taxed by Microsoft. He would get paid for the work a Linux distribution was doing, and the Linux distribution would not get that money. Read more

Software: Gscan2PD, GIMP and LibreOffice

  • Gscan2PDF 2.6.0 Released with import-all Option

    The official Gscan2PDF PPA has made the new release packages for all current Ubuntu releases, and their derivatives, including Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 19.10, Linux Mint 18.x and 19.x

  • 5 Tools That Allow You to Make a Free Logo

    2. Gimp Unlike Tailor Brands, GIMP is more of a photo editor which means that it comes with way more tools and features. If you want to do more than logo designing, then GIMP is your right choice. It comes with a customizable interface that not only covers cosmetics, but also the behavior of the various tools that it has. There are photo enhancement tools that help you to get rid of image distortions, colors, and other imperfections. Another benefit is support for multiple file formats viz. JPEG, PSD, PNG, and GIF.

  • Community Member Monday: Celia Palacios

    I am a Mexican old-guard user of Linux since 2001. I studied Electronic Engineering, and I have been working in that field since 1989. I learnt all sorts of Linux stuff because I love to learn by myself. In addition, I love to read historical detective novels, lots of science fiction, and go to the movies with my husband. I love philosophy, symbolism and many alternative ideas about everything. I also like to have long, friendly debates about everybody’s presumptions (or assumptions?). I try to be open-minded, specially in this times when everyone’s getting polarized Mexico about our President. I used to be an athletic gal, but now I am a total coach-potato! Thanks, Netflix!

SUSE Continues Working On Linux Core Scheduling For Better Security

SUSE and other companies like DigitalOcean have been working on Linux core scheduling to make virtualization safer particularly in light of security vulnerabilities like L1TF and MDS. The core scheduling work is about ensuring different VMs don't share a HT sibling but rather only the same VM / trusted applications run on siblings of a core. SUSE's Dario Faggioli presented at the KVM Forum 2019 at the end of October in Lyon, France. Dario's presentation covered the latest work on core-scheduling for virtualization. Read more Also: The Disappointing Direction Of Linux Performance From 4.16 To 5.4 Kernels