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Graphics/Benchmarks

Embedded tech and use of Linux at the 2014 GPU Technology Conference

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The first keynote took place on the second day, and was delivered by Jen-Hsun Huang, NVIDIA CEO. His talk featured announcements of new architectures such as Pascal that will power the next generation of GPGPU products from the company, to the Jetson TK1 which is billed as the world's first embedded supercomputer. While Pascal will be used in the next generation of supercomputers and workstations, Jetson is targeted at the embedded market and both make extensive use of Linux. The keynote featured an Audi self-driven car appearing on stage powered by a Jetson-based architecture, and it ended in the announcement that all attendees would receive an Android powered NVIDIA shield.

[...]

It is clear that OpenGL is alive and well, with many exciting developments in this area. Interestingly, many of these are being fuelled by growing interest from the gaming industry as they port to new Linux-based platforms such as SteamOS. Live demos were given on the Jetson in the future of OpenGL session, and the Approaching Zero Driver Overhead talk from the preceding Game Developers Conference was referenced quite heavily. Several enhancements to the binary driver were mentioned in reference to better supporting scene graphs and real-time ray-tracing using nVidia's Optix platform was showcased and ultimately featured in one of the awards for the work on the HIV capsid as a showcase of what GPU technology can do to help drive forward progress in scientific research.

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Oracle Linux 6.5 vs. Oracle Linux 7.0 Beta Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

In the days ahead we will have benchmarks of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS against Oracle Linux 6.5 and 7.0 Beta 1 along with CentOS 6.5 and the RHEL 7 release candidate among other enterprise-oriented Linux distributions. For this article to end out the weekend are just some benchmarks of Oracle Linux 6.5 vs. 7.0 Beta 1 when tested from the same hardware -- an Intel Core i7 3960X Ivy Bridge Extreme Edition system with a total of 12 logical CPU threads.

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TP-LINK TG-3468: A $12 Linux PCI-E Gigabit Network Adapter

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The TP-LINK TG-3468 is a 10/100/1000 Gigabit PCI Express network adapter that supports Wake-On-LAN, Auto MDI/MDIX, jumbo frame support, and includes a low-profile bracket for those wishing to install the adapter within a low-profile system. I ended up purchasing the TP-LINK TG-3468 when needing a few Linux friendly network adapters with Wake-On-LAN support for some systems in our benchmarking test farm at Phoronix.

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Linux 3.15 Lands Some DRM Graphics Driver Fixes

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Likely most notable from this latest DRM fixes series entering the Linux kernel is the microcode fixes for some newer graphics cards, mainly fixing up the dynamic power management support for the AMD Radeon R7 260X graphics card. Besides the microcode fixes to stabilize newer GCN-era hardware, there's also some run-time power management fixes, and PLL regression fixes for the Radeon driver. Hopefully this pull will fix a Radeon DRM problem previously mentioned on Phoronix during the early Linux 3.15 benchmarking. Many more Linux 3.15 kernel benchmarks are forthcoming on Phoronix.

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AMD Is Disabling DPM Support For RV770 GPUs

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Graphics/Benchmarks

AMD's Alex Deucher sent out a patch on Friday to disable Dynamic Power Management on the RV770 by default. The DPM for the RV770 was enabled by default with the Linux 3.13 kernel and it yields better/lower power consumption while idling, better performance if the video BIOS sets lower clock speeds at boot time, and with the lower power consumption can also come lower heat output. However, some users have reported issues with RV770 GPUs in using the Linux 3.13 kernel and newer. (In my personal testing of several different RV770 GPUs, I haven't encountered any issues with Linux 3.13+.)
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Ubuntu 12.04 LTS vs. 14.04 LTS Cloud Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Server
Ubuntu

These regressions are a bit frightening but we are still in the process of conducting further tests -- both bare metal and in the public clouds -- to try to figure out more closely what's going on. However, for most users I wouldn't hold off on upgrading to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS since it will ultimately be needed for the longest support within enterprise environments, for desktop users there are plenty of new features, the hardware enablement is much better on 14.04 LTS, the open-source graphics stack is much better, and there's many other non-performance advantages in using Ubuntu 14.04 LTS.

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13-Way Low-End GPU Comparison With AMD's AM1 Athlon

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Graphics/Benchmarks

For our latest AM1 platform testing with the Athlon 5350 Kabini APU is comparing its Radeon R3 Graphics against an assortment of discrete NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards while running Ubuntu 14.04 Linux. For this comparison there's thirteen graphics processors being compared with the latest Linux GPU drivers.

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Ubuntu 12.04 LTS vs. 14.04 LTS Server Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

To complement the just-published Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS, 13.10, and 14.04 LTS desktop benchmarks are results when running a variety of workstation and server oriented benchmarks.

From an Intel Core i7 4960X Ivy Bridge Extreme Edition system were these open-source server/workstation benchmarks being tested on clean installs of 12.04.4 LTS, 13.10, and 14.04 LTS. The stock settings and options were used.

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Ubuntu 12.04.4 vs. 13.10 vs. 14.04 LTS Desktop Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 14.04 LTS being released today, here's some fresh benchmarks comparing the Ubuntu 14.04 64-bit performance against Ubuntu 13.10 and Ubuntu 12.04.4 LTS. In this article are desktop and gaming benchmarks comparing these versions of Ubuntu Linux.

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Intel Haswell Graphics Benchmarks From Linux 3.15

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Following this week's 3.15-rc1 release, I ran some early tests of the Linux 3.15 kernel compared to the earlier kernel releases. In particular, the early Linux 3.15 Intel results were compared against the stable Linux 3.14 and 3.13 kernels. Testing was done from an Intel Core i7 4770K "Haswell" system with HD Graphics 4600.

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AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT Linux Performance

AMD today is shipping the Radeon RX 5500 XT as the new sub-$200 Navi graphics card. This 7nm graphics card offers 22 compute units, 1408 stream processors, up to 5.6 TFLOPS of compute power, 4GB or 8GB GDDR6 video memory options, and built atop their modern RDNA architecture and supporting features in common with the RX 5700 series like PCIe 4.0 support. Here is a look at the initial Linux gaming performance of the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT with various gaming benchmarks and Steam Play tests as well. The Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB version is launching at $169 USD while the Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB version will command $199 USD. These price points put them comparable to the current Radeon RX 580 / 590 retail cards. AMD markets the RX 5500 XT as offering 1.6x the performance-per-Watt of the original Polaris Radeon RX 480 and designed for 1080p gaming to go up against NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER graphics card. Read more

KDE's December 2019 Apps Update

The release of new versions for KDE applications is part of KDE’s continued effort to bring you a complete and up-to-date catalog of fully-featured, beautiful and useful programs for your system. Available now are new versions of KDE’s file browser Dolphin; Kdenlive, one of the most complete open source video editors; the document viewer Okular; KDE’s image viewer, Gwenview; and all of your other favorite KDE apps and utilities. All of these applications have been improved, making them faster and more stable and they boast exciting new features. The new versions of KDE applications let you be productive and creative, while at the same time making use of KDE software easy and fun. We hope you enjoy all the novel features and improvements worked into all of KDE’s apps! Read more Also: KDE Applications 19.12 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New KDE Applications 19.12 Released With Big Improvements To Kdenlive + Other KDE Programs

Games: Feral Interactive, Fantasy Strike, GNU/Linux as Gaming Platform

  • Seems like Feral Interactive may have a few surprises for Linux in 2020

    Porting studio Feral Interactive [Official Site] have already given Linux a lot of games and it sounds like more are coming. While this year they've already released Shadow of the Tomb Raider Definitive Edition, a Vulkan beta for Shadow of Mordor, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and DiRT 4 plus plus big updates/expansions to Company of Heroes 2 and Total War: WARHAMMER II. Still to come is Life is Strange 2, which Feral previously teased to arrive sometime soon.

  • Fighting game Fantasy Strike adds full cross-platform online play with PC and Consoles

    The very pretty fighting game Fantasy Strike from Sirlin Games just got a great update, enabling cross-platform online play between Linux/macOS/Windows and the Nintendo Switch and Playstation 4 consoles. Apply to all online modes including Casual and Ranked, find a match should be a lot easier now. You can also challenge or spectate others from your in-game friends list, which also works across all platforms too as you can add people from any platform based on tags.

  • Looking towards other operating systems

    Learning a new operating system from scratch is a daunting experience for many people. Fortunately, there are a few Linux distributions that come with a Windows-like desktop environment such as a form of a star bar at the bottom. However, Windows and Linux operating on vastly different philosophies, to the way that they are organized to the way that the files are handled. Linux employs the traditional monolithic kernel and it provides a hierarchical view of the files. Because it is modular, most of the necessary drivers can be loaded and unloaded dynamically. One of the major appeals of Linux is that it is open-source, compared to Microsoft which is a closed and inaccessible environment. Windows is made for simple and out of the box use and directed toward inexperienced users, a reason why the OS has been adopted by so many people. Linux puts more emphasis on the user, who has the possibility of customizing the desktop environment to suit their needs. Windows also offer a few, but fairly limited customization options. The main reason why people avoid switching to Linux is their gaming habits. Linux is known for not playing well with most PC games. Most PC games are being developed with Windows as the main platforms with some companies providing Linux support sometime after the original release. Games that do not have a Linux release require third party compatibility applications to run Windows games. The major application that is used to play Windows games on Linux is Wine. The developers of Wine have specified that the software is not an emulator but more of a compatibility layer for Linux to run Windows programs, not just games. In the world of programming, Wine is considered a masterpiece and one of the greatest feats of open source development that allows most Windows binaries to run on Linux without relying on any of Microsoft’s dependencies. Most of the Wine resources are dedicated to running the complicated frameworks of various DirectX components. [...] Many people prefer to enjoy online gaming, especially casino games. The beauty of these games is that most are available and can be played directly in the browser. The default browser that Linux uses is Mozilla Firefox, which itself, is a powerful browser. Because online casinos are played directly in the browser, there is almost no difference between playing them on Linux and playing them in Windows. There are also casino games that can be downloaded with most of them being made to run only on Windows due to a large number of people using the OS. As mentioned before, to run most Windows software, players have the option to use WINE. However, since because playing the casinos using the browser, most people are better off sticking with that version. Many games from online roulette to poker, and other table games are available online. Almost all online casinos found online have the option to play instantly with no download required, which is why any OS that can run a browser is perfectly capable to run casino games. Linux has been around for a long time, but it was only in the last 10 years that people have started noticing the operating system becoming more friendlier and easy to learn. Besides the many desktop environments, customizability, community and growing compatibility of games, as well as more security, many have started the transition from Windows to Linux.

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