Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa Can Finally Build With Almost No Compiler Warnings

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Quite a feat for modern open-source projects with large C/C++ code-bases developed over the years, Mesa3D can almost be compiled now without any warnings -- there's just one remaining.

When paired with the latest GCC 8 stable compiler, Mesa paired with some pending patches is down to just one compiler warning left in the build process -- quite an improvement compared to in the past with older versions of GCC and Mesa.

Read more

Linux Graphics: Intel, NVIDIA, Mesa, and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Preparing A Final Batch Of Graphics Driver Changes For Linux 4.20~5.0

    Intel open-source developers have already sent in multiple pull requests of feature work to DRM-Next that in turn will be pulled into the Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel merge window and they have one final batch of feature changes on the way.

    The cut-off is quickly approaching for new feature work slated for this next kernel cycle (Linux 4.20, or renamed to Linux 5.0 if Linus Torvalds sticks to his usual versioning preference) and Intel has announced a batch of changes ready for testing ahead of issuing it as a pull request to DRM-Next.

  • NVIDIA Sends Out DRM Display Patches For Tegra's Xavier SoC

    Going back to the beginning of the year NVIDIA developers have been contributing "Tegra194" enablement to the upstream Linux kernel. They've now moved on to contributing T194 support to the Tegra Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for display support on this SoC that's better known as Xavier.

    The Tegra194 / Xavier is NVIDIA's latest SoC with the eight Carmel ARMv8 cores and Volta-based GPU. The NVIDIA Xavier Developer Kits have begun shipping and now with all of the other necessary hardware enablement bits upstream or on their way to mainline, the latest patches being published are for the display support with the Tegra DRM driver.

  • More Linux Tests & Driver Observations With The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

    Here are some additional notes to complement my GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux review from yesterday now that I've had more time with this card and a working Linux driver.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Is Coming This Week With Dozens Of Fixes

    As the first stable point release to the newly-christened Mesa 18.2, the Mesa 18.2.1 release is going to be a big one.

    The release candidate to Mesa 18.2.1 was issued on Wednesday and has nearly 60 patches over the recent 18.2.0 stable release. This includes Vulkan header updates for v1.1.84 and many RADV / ANV Vulkan driver fixes ranging from CTS issues to hangs to other fixes.

  • Mesa 18.2.1 Released With A Number Of Fixes For The Vulkan Drivers

    Mesa 18.2.1 is out this morning as the first stable point release to the recently introduced Mesa 18.2 series. Mesa 18.2.1 marks the point at which it should be relatively safe for stable-minded users to switch over to this quarterly release stream.

    Given it's the first point release after a very active development cycle, there are a lot of fixes: around five dozen changes are making up today's release coming two weeks after v18.2.0.

  • AMD Adds A Seemingly New Polaris ID To Their Linux Driver

    It looks like another re-branded AMD Polaris graphics card might be on the way given the latest AMDGPU Linux kernel patch.

    Either there's a new AMD Radeon "Polaris" graphics card coming, some new modem for OEMs, or just very tardy maintenance in adding the necessary PCI ID for an existing Polaris graphics card revision... But two years after Polaris RX 400 cards first debuted (and a year and a half since the RX 500 series), there is now a new Polaris PCI ID being added to the AMD Linux graphics driver.

Mir Release 1.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • IoT Graphics: Mir Release 1.0

    The Mir team is pleased to announce the milestone release of Mir 1.0.0. This is the first major release targeted at IoT device makers and enthusiasts looking to build the next-generation of graphical solutions.

  • Mir 1.0 Released For "Next-Generation of Graphical Solutions"

    As we were expecting over the last few days, the long-awaited release of Mir 1.0 is now available. It's certainly a different beast now than when "Mir 1.0" was talked about in the past now that it's focused on providing Wayland support.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Shows Very Strong Compute Performance Potential

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Besides the new GeForce RTX 2080 series being attractive for developers wanting to make use of new technologies like RTX/ray-tracing, mesh shaders, and DLSS (Deep Learning Super Sampling), CUDA and OpenCL benchmarking so far on the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is yielding impressive performance -- even outside of the obvious AI / deep learning potential workloads with the Turing tensor cores. Here are some benchmarks looking at the OpenCL/CUDA performance on the high-end Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing cards as well as an AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 for reference. System power consumption, performance-per-Watt, and performance-per-dollar metrics also round out this latest Ubuntu Linux GPU compute comparison.

Read more

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 To RTX 2080 Ti Graphics/Compute Performance

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday were the initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux benchmarks based upon my early testing of this high-end Turing graphics card paired with their new 410 Linux graphics driver. For your viewing pleasure today is a look at how the RTX 2080 Ti compares to the top-end cards going back to Kepler... Or, simply put, it's the GeForce GTX 680 vs. GTX 780 Ti vs. 980 Ti vs. 1080 Ti vs. 2080 Ti comparison with OpenGL and Vulkan graphics tests as well as some initial OpenCL / CUDA tests but more Turing GPU compute tests are currently being conducted. For making this historical comparison more interesting are also power consumption and performance-per-Watt metrics.

With the Linux support on the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti fairing well, one of the curiosity-driven tests was this comparison featuring the "[x]x80" series cards of Kepler, Maxwell, Pascal, and Turing for an interesting benchmarking look at the NVIDIA graphics/compute speed going back to the GTX 680 debut in 2012. The GTX 680, GTX 780 Ti, GTX 980 Ti, GTX 1080 Ti, and RTX 2080 Ti were all tested using this newest Linux driver release, 410.57 beta, while running on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS box with the Linux 4.18 kernel.

Read more

Nouveau and NVIDIA News

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nouveau Developers Begin Reverse-Engineering NVIDIA Turing Driver Support

    The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 graphics cards are only officially beginning to ship today, but at least one independent Nouveau developer already has his hands on the hardware and beginning to work on the clean-room, driver reverse-engineering process in order to eventually get open-source "Nouveau" driver support working.

  • NVIDIA CUDA 10 Officially Released With Turing Support, nvJPEG, CUDA-Vulkan

    Coinciding with the debut of the GeForce RTX 2080 series line-up is now the official release of CUDA 10.0.

    CUDA 10.0.130 is now official after being announced back at SIGGRAPH. This NVIDIA compute architecture update provides Turing GPU support and its Tensor Cores, NVSwitch Fabric support, nvJPEG as a new library for JPEG processing, various performance tuning for its expansive library set, a new async task-graph programming model, interoperability improvements with Vulkan and D3D12, and new developer tools.

  • NVIDIA have released the 410.57 driver as well as a 396.54.06 Vulkan beta driver to help DXVK

    Along with the release of the GeForce RTX 2080 GPU series NVIDIA have put out a new 410.57 driver to support it. Additionally, there's a new Vulkan beta driver which should help DXVK.

  • Help Test Intel+Nvidia Hybrid Graphics GDM3 Fixes In Ubuntu 18.04

    Ubuntu 18.04 shipped with two issues for Intel+Nvidia hybrid graphics users: an increase in power consumption when the discrete GPU is off, and the inability to switch between power profiles with a simple logout (a restart is currently required).

    These issues are caused by changes in logind, Nvidia drivers packaging (which is now more granular), and the migration from LightDM to GDM3, and they were fixed in Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks

    This article is going to be short and sweet as just receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti yesterday and then not receiving the Linux driver build until earlier today... The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti has been busy now for a few hours with the Phoronix Test Suite on the Core i7 8086K system running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the latest drivers.

  • NVIDIA Introduces A Number Of New OpenGL Extensions For Turing

    As part of the GeForce RTX 2080 series launching with the new GPU architecture, NVIDIA has published a number of new OpenGL extensions for making use of some of Turing's new capabilities.

  • Vulkan 1.1.85 Released With Raytracing, Mesh Shaders & Other New NVIDIA Extensions

    Leading up to the Turing launch we weren't sure if NVIDIA was going to deliver same-day Vulkan support for RTX/ray-tracing with the GeForce RTX graphics cards or if it was going to be left up to Direct3D 12 on Windows for a while... Fortunately, as already reported, their new driver has Vulkan RTX support. Additionally, the NVX_raytracing extension and other NVIDIA updates made it into today's Vulkan 1.1.85 release.

  • Radeon/GPUOpen OCAT 1.2 Released But No Linux Support Yet

    A new feature release is out for the Radeon/GPUOpen "OCAT" open-source capture and analytics tool.

    OCAT 1.2 is their first release of the year and includes VR head-mounted display (HMD) support, new visualization tools, system information detection, new settings, and other enhancements.

Graphics: NVIDIA and Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Vulkan Beta Adds New KHR_driver_properties & KHR_shader_atomic_int64

    Not to be confused with the new NVIDIA Linux/Windows drivers that should be out today for RTX 2070/2080 "Turing" support and also initial RTX ray-tracing support, there is also out a new Vulkan beta driver this morning.

    The NVIDIA 396.54.06 driver is this new Vulkan beta and as implied by the version number is still on the current stable branch and not in the Turing era. But this driver release is quite exciting as it does bring support for two new extensions... These extensions are very fresh and not yet in the official Vulkan specification: VK_KHR_driver_properties and VK_KHR_shader_atomic_int64.

  • GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks Coming Today, NVIDIA Driver Bringing Vulkan RTX

    NVIDIA's review/performance embargo has now lifted on the GeForce RTX 2080 series ahead of the cards shipping tomorrow. I should have out initial Linux benchmarks later today, assuming Linux driver availability.

    As wrote about yesterday, just yesterday I ended up receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti for Linux benchmarking. But, unfortunately, no Linux driver yet... But I am told it will be posted publicly soon with the Windows driver. Assuming that happens within the hours ahead, I'll still have initial RTX 2080 Ti benchmarks on Ubuntu Linux out by today's end -- thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and recently wrapping up other NVIDIA/AMD GPU comparison tests on the current drivers.

  • Intel's New Iris Gallium3D Driver Picks Up Experimental Icelake Bits, GL Features

    One of the talks we are most interested in at XDC2018 is on the Intel "Iris" Gallium3D driver we discovered last month was in development.

    We stumbled across the Iris Gallium3D driver that's been in development for months as a potential replacement to their "i965" classic Mesa driver. But they haven't really detailed their intentions in full, but we should learn more next week. This is particularly exciting the prospects of an official Intel Gallium3D driver as the company is also expected to introduce their discrete GPUs beginning in 2020 and this new driver could be part of that plan.

Linux, the Linux Foundation and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Patches Surface For Supporting The Creative Sound BlasterX AE-5

    Last year Creative Labs introduced the Sound BlasterX AE-5 PCI Express gaming sound card while finally there are some patches pending for supporting this high-end sound card in Linux.

    Connor McAdams who most recently got the Creative Recon3D support into good shape on Linux has now been working on getting the Sound BlasterX AE-5 working well on Linux.

  • Blockchain Training Takes Off

    Meanwhile, job postings related to blockchain and Hyperledger are taking off, and knowledge in these areas is translating into opportunity. Careers website Glassdoor lists thousands of job posts related to blockchain.

  • AMD Picasso Support Comes To The RadeonSI OpenGL Driver

    Last week AMD sent out initial support for yet-to-be-released "Picasso" APUs with the Linux AMDGPU kernel graphics driver. Today on the user-space side the support was merged for the OpenGL RadeonSI Gallium3D driver.

    Picasso details are still fairly light but they are expected to be similar to Raven Ridge and for the AM4 processor socket as well as an edition for notebooks. On the same day as publishing the Picasso AMDGPU kernel patches, AMD also went ahead and published the Linux patches for the "Raven 2" APUs too.

  • The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Arrives For Linux Benchmarking

    It looks like NVIDIA has their launch-day Linux support in order for the GeForce RTX 2080 "Turing" graphics cards slated to ship later this week as arriving today at Phoronix was the RTX 2080 Ti.

    The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti is NVIDIA's new flagship desktop GPU with the Turing GPU architecture, 4352 CUDA cores, a 1635MHz boost clock speed rating for this Founder's Edition model, 11GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding a 616 GB/s memory bandwidth rating, and designed to suit real-time ray-tracing workloads with their RTX technology. Pricing on the RTX 2080 Ti Founder's Edition is $1,199 USD. Last week NVIDIA published more details on the Turing architecture for those interested as well as on the new mesh shader capability.

Mesa Graphics Development

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV's Iffy 16-bit Integer Support Merged Into Mesa

    Just days after the patches were published for enabling 16-bit integers within shaders for the RADV driver, this Radeon Vulkan driver code has been merged.

    The code came out last week by Valve developer Samuel Pitoiset for enabling shaderInt16, the capability allowing 16-bit signed/unsigned integers within the shader code.

  • Mesa Eyeing The Removal Of Autotools Build Support In Favor Of Meson

    For those currently relying upon Autotools for building Mesa3D, the days are numbered and soon will likely need to shift over to their modern Meson build system support.

    For the past year now, Mesa developers have been working on bringing up their Meson build system support for its faster build speeds with Ninja, better cross-platform compatibility, and other benefits. Meson has co-existed with the Autotools (and SCons and Android build systems) support over the past year of Mesa releases, but moving forward they are likely very soon to drop the Autotools support.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more

Source Code From Deutsche Telekom

  • Edge compute platform is open source
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have partnered for the creation of an Open Source, low latency Edge compute platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster.
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent Create Open Source Edge Software Framework
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent today announced the creation of an Open Source, Low Latency Edge Compute Platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster. The cost-effective Edge platform is built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and is decentralized, to accelerate the deployment of ultra-low latency applications. The joint solution will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • DT and Aricent announce telco Open Source Edge framework for 5G
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have announced the creation of an Open Source Edge software framework, designed especially for developers, platform-as-a-service and cloud-native multi-access edge computing technologies and on-track to intersect with the deployment of 5G enabled network edge facilities to tackle ultra-low latency network applications. The Edge platform has been built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent brew up edge compute platform for 5G apps and services
    In order to speed up the rollout of 5G applications and services, Duetsche Telekom and Aricent have teamed up to build an edge compute platform. The open source, edge software framework was built for use in software-defined data centers in decentralized locations. It also uses cloud-native multiaccess edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent Bridge Cloud Native, Telco MEC Gap
    German telecom giant Deutsche Telekom and Aricent threw their collective weight behind an open source edge computing platform targeted at software-defined data centers (SDDC). The initiative gamely joins a growing list of open source multi-access edge computing (MEC) initiatives. The DT-Aricent collaboration is at its core a decentralized platform designed to help telecom operators develop and launch low-latency 5G mobile applications and services. It includes a software framework with features delivered through a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model.

Android Leftovers