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Graphics/Benchmarks

An Early Look At The AMD P-State CPPC Driver Performance vs. ACPI CPUFreq

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Earlier this month AMD posted their initial public patches for the AMD P-State CPU frequency scaling driver that leverages ACPI CPPC for ultimately aiming to provide better power efficiency and more responsive CPU frequency scaling / performance state decisions on Zen 3 (and Zen 2 eventually) processors. This is part of the effort around AMD and Valve collaborating for better Linux efficiency especially with the AMD-powered Steam Deck.

This amd_pstate driver remains a work-in-progress and so far was just sent out in initial patch form earlier this month and not yet queued up for mainlining, etc. It will likely take a few rounds of review before being merged especially with not all Zen 2/3 CPUs/APUs are yet supported among other items still settling with this new driver.

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Mesa 21.2.2

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Hi list,

I'd like to announce Mesa 21.2.2, which is now available for
consumption.

This release is a bit late, and very large.  We've got a ton of work
going into panfrost, getting it closer to being conformant (it is
conformant on 21.3!), as well as fixes for ir3, croccus, nir, utils,
llvmpipe, gallivm, zink, glsl, v3d, vc4, intel, mesa, aco, iris, radv,
and even osmesa.

We'll hopefully be back on schedule after this.

Cheers,
Dylan

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Also: Mesa 21.2.2 Released "Late & Very Large" - Phoronix

Graphics: X.Org Server 21.1 RC1, AMDGPU Linux Driver, and Xwayland Concern

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • X.Org Server 21.1 RC1 Released With VRR Support For Modesetting Driver, Other Features - Phoronix

    More than three years after X.Org Server 1.20 was released, it's set to finally be succeeded soon by X.Org Server 21.1 under its new versioning scheme. Out today is the X.org Server 21.1 release candidate.

    X.Org Server 21.1 is finally coming to light after being organized by new X.Org Server release manager volunteer Povilas Kanapickas. Even this new 21.1 release planning is running a few weeks late due to lingering changes to be moved. Rather than RC1 at the end of August, it's now coming at the end of September, but in any case it's looking like the official xorg-server 21.1.0 release will be out this year.

  • xorg-server 21.0.99.901

    This is the first release candidate of Xorg 21.1.0 release.

  • AMDGPU Linux Driver To Overhaul Its Approach To Device Enumeration - Phoronix

    AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver engineers are working to overhaul how the initial driver loading with device enumeration happens to ultimately make it more robust. In the process though PCI IDs become less important and in turn less of an avenue for exposing possible indicators of new graphics cards.

    A set of 66 patches were sent out today that alter more than two thousand lines of code. The change is ultimately more about having the device enumeration and discovery of supported IP/hardware blocks rather than being tied explicitly to PCI device IDs. All recent AMD GPUs do contain an "IP discovery table" for noting the different graphics, video encode/decode, and other blocks on the hardware -- the AMDGPU kernel driver would basically use that for determining its code paths and what is supported, etc.

  • Peter Hutterer: An Xorg release without Xwayland

    And it's a release without Xwayland.

    And... wait, what?

    Let's unwind this a bit, and ideally you should come away with a better understanding of Xorg vs Xwayland, and possibly even Wayland itself.
    Heads up: if you are familiar with X, the below is simplified to the point it hurts. Sorry about that, but as an X developer you're probably good at coping with pain.

    Let's go back to the 1980s, when fashion was weird and there were still reasons to be optimistic about the future. Because this is a thought exercise, we go back with full hindsight 20/20 vision and, ideally, the winning Lotto numbers in case we have some time for some self-indulgence.

Panfrost achieves OpenGL ES 3.1 conformance on Mali-G52

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Graphics/Benchmarks

The open source Panfrost driver for Mali GPUs has now achieved official conformance on Mali-G52 for OpenGL ES 3.1, as seen on the Khronos adopters list. This important milestone is a step forward for the open source driver, as it now certifies Panfrost for use in commercial products containing Mali G52 and paves the way for further conformance submissions on other Mali GPUs.

Conformance requires passing tens of thousands of OpenGL integration tests in a single run. Over the summer, we wrote hundreds of patches to fix failing tests. While no amount of testing can guarantee the absence of bugs, passing conformance gets us close.

To ensure we remain conformant, we've upgraded our continuous integration infrastructure to run more tests before every merge. Ideally, we could re-run the complete conformance suite for every commit, but that's infeasible when a single run takes 11 hours on commercial hardware. Nevertheless, with multiple devices, tuned test configurations, and multithreading, we can run 99.5% of the tests in our 10 minute pre-merge budget. This ensures to a high degree of confidence that Panfrost only becomes more stable each release without regressions. I would like to extend a warm thanks to Emma Anholt for developing the infrastructure required for this feat.

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Cycles X Merged Into Blender 3.0 With NVIDIA CUDA/OptiX Support, AMD HIP Pending

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Software

Cycles X as a modernizing of Blender's Cycles rendering engine has now landed in the latest development code for Blender 3.0. Cycles X brings big performance improvements but does eliminate OpenCL support in the process.

Cycles X was one of the reasons for the delay in the Blender 3.0 release to allow time for this Cycles overhaul to land. As of yesterday, the Cycles-X branch was merged into the Blender 3.0 code-base as a major renderer update.

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Graphics: AMD, Mesa, and Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • AMD Extending DWARF To Better Handle GPU Debugging, Continues Collaborating With GCC & LLVM - Phoronix

    In addition to AMD's increasing Linux kernel contributions, they are also contributing more improvements in user-space too thanks to their super-computing wins and other big enterprise deployments that are Linux-based. One of the areas talked about this week at the Linux Plumbers Conference with the GNU Tools track is how they are working to extend the DWARF debug format to better handle GPU debugging.

    AMD engineers have been working on extensions to the DWARF debugging data format to cater to SIMT/SIMD debugging with a particular focus on GPUs/accelerators. They are ultimately hoping these improvements will make it into the DWARF Version 6 format to come in the future.

  • Mesa 21.3 Lands Initial Radeon Ray-Tracing Support In Open-Source RADV Vulkan Driver - Phoronix

    Landing overnight into Mesa 21.3 was experimentally enabling the Vulkan ray-tracing extensions within the open-source Radeon "RADV" driver.

    The current conditions for this experimental ray-tracing in RADV are using RDNA2 / Radeon RX 6000 series or newer (GFX 10.3+), using the default ACO compiler back-end and not the AMDGPU LLVM shader compiler, and using the "RADV_PERFTEST=rt" environment variable for enabling the extensions.

  • Vulkan Video Decoding Still In The Early Stages For Open-Source - Phoronix

    Going public back in April was the provisional specification around the Vulkan Video extensions as a new industry-standard video encode/decode interface. While several months have passed, there hasn't been much activity yet in the open-source space around Vulkan Video.

    As it stands now on Linux there are NVIDIA Vulkan beta driver builds supporting the Vulkan Video extensions but there isn't any support elsewhere whether it be closed or open-source Linux drivers... Sadly, nothing yet from the Mesa Vulkan drivers.

Graphics: GL, Libinput, NVIDIA, and AMD

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Underwater

    I got a request recently to fix up the WebGL Aquarium demo. I’ve had this bookmarked for a while since it’s one of the only test cases for GL_EXT_multisampled_render_to_texture I’m aware of, at least when running Chrome in EGL mode.

    Naturally, I decided to do both at once since this would be yet another extension that no native desktop driver in Mesa currently supports.

  • xf86-input-libinput 1.2.0

    This release introduces support for touchpad gestures that will
    be available as part of X server 21.1. Additionally high-resolution
    scrolling data is now acquired from libinput if available and sent
    downstream to X server. The default scroll distance has been bumped
    to 120 in the process, but this should not affect correctly written
    clients.

  • xf86-input-libinput 1.2 Brings Touchpad Gestures, High Resolution Scrolling - Phoronix

    For those continuing to make use of the X.Org Server, xf86-input-libinput 1.2 is now available for integrating the latest functionality of libinput input handling library.

    Libinput 1.19 released last week with support for hold gesture types and high resolution wheel scrolling. The xf86-input-libinput 1.2 release for this X.Org DDX now supports touchpad gestures and high resolution scrolling data as well when pairing this driver with libinput 1.19. In the case of the hold gestures, it requires to be used in conjunction with the forthcoming X.Org Server 21.1 release.

  • NVIDIA Prepares The Linux Kernel For Future Laptops With EC-Driven Backlights - Phoronix

    NVIDIA is contributing a new open-source driver to the upstream Linux kernel for dealing with upcoming laptops where the backlight controls are handled by the device's embedded controller (EC).

    With Linux 5.16 later this year NVIDIA is ready with the "wmaa-backlight-wmi" driver for EC-based backlight controls for upcoming laptop/notebook computers.

  • AMD Continues CRIU Work To Checkpoint/Restore ROCm Compute Workloads - Phoronix

    Earlier this year AMD went public with prototyping CRIU support for Radeon GPUs around ROCm to be able to checkpoint/freeze running compute workloads and to then restore them at a later point. This CRIU focus is driven by their big accelerator needs and forthcoming supercomputers for migrating workloads particularly within containers. AMD continues working on CRIU support for GPUs and last week provided an update on the project.

Kernel: KSMBD, ASUS, Rust in Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • That Didn't Take Long: KSMBD In-Kernel File Server Already Needs Important Security Fix - Phoronix

    It was just a few weeks back that KSMBD was merged into Linux 5.15 while now it's seeing its first important security fix.

    When KSMBD as an in-kernel SMB3 file server was first talked about, many expressed concerns in the name of security even though NFS exists within the kernel, etc. This weekend's security vulnerability for KSMBD is an issue leading to files outside of the SMB3 file share being accessible to clients...

  • Linux 5.16 To Support Sensor Readings On More ASUS Motherboards - Phoronix

    With a change to the nct6775 hardware monitoring sensor driver, more ASUS motherboards should enjoy working sensor support come Linux 5.16.

    The changed queued up this week via the "HWMON" hardware monitoring subsystem's "for-next" branch for Linux 5.16 allows the nct6775 driver to access the ASIC using ASUS WMI functions. The driver's existing functionality doesn't work on ASUS motherboards since ACPI marks the I/O port as used so instead the ASUS WMI functions will be used in such case.

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  • An OpenCL frontend written in Rust is being developed for Mesa

    Red Hat’s Karol Herbst, who is involved in the development of Mesa, the Nouveau driver, and the OpenCL open stack, has published rusticl , an experimental software implementation of OpenCL (OpenCL frontend) for Mesa written in Rust. Rusticl acts as an analogue of the frontend already present in Mesa OpenCL Clover and is also developed using the interface provided in Mesa Gallium .

    The development was presented on September 17 at the conference XDC 2021 (X.Org Developers Conference). The goal of the development was to study Rust, work out the best ways to integrate Rust into Mesa, try out creating API implementations in another language, and test the compatibility of Rust components with the rest of the C code. Development is not yet fully completed – CL CTS tests related to copying, reading and writing buffers are already successfully running, but compiler integration is not yet provided and there is no support for external crate packages in the build system. To generate bindings for Mesa and OpenCL, allowing cause Rust-functions in C code and vice versa, is involved rust-bindgen .

Kernel: Graphics and Linux M1 Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • AMD + Valve Focusing On P-State / CPPC Driver With Schedutil For Better Linux Efficiency - Phoronix

    As reported at the start of August, AMD and Valve have been working on Linux CPU performance/frequency scaling improvements with the Steam Deck being one of the leading motivators. As speculated at that time, their work would likely revolve around use of ACPI CPPC found with Zen 2 CPUs and newer. Published last week was that AMD P-State driver for Linux systems indeed now leveraging CPPC information. AMD formally presented this new driver yesterday at XDC2021.

  • DRM Driver Posted For AI Processing Unit - Initially Focused On Mediatek SoCs - Phoronix

    BayLibre developer Alexandre Bailon has posted a "request for comments" of a new open-source Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for AI Processing Unit (APU) functionality. Initially the driver is catering to Mediatek SoCs with an AI co-processor but this DRM "APU" driver could be adapted to other hardware too.

    Alexandre Bailon sums up this DRM AI Processing Unit driver as "a DRM driver that implements communication between the CPU and an APU. This uses VirtIO buffer to exchange messages. For the data, we allocate a GEM object and map it using IOMMU to make it available to the APU. The driver is relatively generic, and should work with any SoC implementing hardware accelerator for AI if they use support remoteproc and VirtIO."

  • Apple M1 USB Type-C Linux Support Code Sent Out For Testing - Phoronix

    he latest patches sent out for review/testing on the long mission for enabling Apple M1 support on Linux is the USB Type-C connectivity.

    Sven Peter has sent out the initial USB Type-C enablement work for the Apple ACE1/2 chips used by Apple M1 systems. In turn this Apple design is based on the TI TPS6598x IP but various differences. The Linux kernel support is being added onto the existing TIPD driver.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa. 

    Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support. 

    KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust. 

    Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering.

    Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

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