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Server/Back End: Blockchain, Cloud Foundry Platform, Kubernetes, Labtainers

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  • Blockchain Consolidation Phase Is Imminent, Hyperledger Chief Says

    Brian Behlendorf, a driving force behind the Apache web server and longtime supporter of open source software, now spends his time developing blockchain technology for the enterprise.

    As the executive director of the Hyperledger project, an open source blockchain initiative hosted by the Linux Foundation, Mr. Behlendorf is working to create enterprise-ready distributed ledger technologies and develop a community of corporate blockchain developers that will outlast a fevered investment climate.

    Blockchain is still nascent in the enterprise, but the conversation has evolved beyond basic technology questions to more involved discussions about scale, interoperability and governance, Mr. Behlendorf said.

  • 6 key data strategy considerations for your cloud-native transformation

    Many organizations are making the move to cloud-native platforms as their strategy for digital transformation. cloud-native allows companies to deliver fast-responding, user-friendly applications with greater agility. However, the architecture of the data in support of cloud-native transformation is often ignored in the hope that it will take care of itself. With data becoming the information currency of every organization, how do you avoid the data mistakes commonly made during this cloud transformation journey? What data questions should you ask when building cloud-native applications? How can you gain valuable insight from your data?

    The ensuing presentation includes six key considerations companies must have when they make this transition to cloud-native.

  • Making Kubernetes Easier with Cloud Foundry Platform

    Kubernetes is one of the biggest technology disruptors to hit the IT industry in a long time — maybe since Amazon EC2, now more than a decade old. It has helped turn containers from a convenient packaging method into the building blocks of modern application architectures, and has shifted the discussion in many circles from cloud computing to cloud-native computing.

    If that seems like a form of technological hair-splitting, it isn’t. Cloud-native technologies and architectures are the means by which more traditional businesses — like insurance, financial services or even heavy machinery — can transition from simply consuming cloud resources into operating like the cloud providers themselves. This is shifting the way they run their businesses, making them more agile, distributed and ready to tackle via software, whatever their businesses demand. As with most new technologies, however, it’s important to look at Kubernetes with some perspective.

  • Virtualized lab demonstration using a tweaked Labtainers running in a container

    Labtainers is quite interesting as it allows isolating a lab in several containers running in their own dedicated virtual network, which helps distributing a lab without needing to install anything locally.

    My tweak allows to run what I called the “master” container which contains the labtainers scripts, instead of having to install labtainers on a Linux host. This should help installation and distribution of labtainers, as well as deploying it on cloud platforms, some day soon. In the meantime Labtainer containers of the labs run with privileges so it’s advised to be careful, and running the whole of these containers in a VM may be safer. Maybe Labtainers will evolve in the future to integrate a containerization of its scripts. My patches are pending, but the upstream authors are currently focused on some other priorities.

Servers, Buzzwords and Red Hat

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  • Containers and microservices and serverless, oh my!

    A new round of buzzword-heavy technologies are becoming relevant to—or at least discussed among—developers, operations professionals, and the tech staff who lead them. Need to come up to speed on the changing cloud and container trends and technologies? If you feel out of the loop, this tech-transfer explainer should provide enlightenment.

    Once upon a time, virtual machines changed how we thought about servers. Then, the cloud changed how we thought about IT. Now, containers have started a new transformation. The latest entry is “serverless”—though I should point out immediately that the term serverless is a misnomer. Future cloud-native applications will consist of both microservices and functions, often wrapped as Linux containers.

    VMs and the cloud enabled DevOps, the practice of developers and IT operations staff collaborating to optimize technology processes. Cloud technologies’ dynamic compute and storage resources made it easier to provision resources. The idea behind DevOps is that developers no longer need to worry about infrastructure because that's taken care of in the background by programs such as Ansible, Chef, and Puppet.

    Then along came containers. Containers use far fewer resources than VMs by using shared operating systems. Containers are also easier to spin up and down when circumstances require it.

  • How a competitive cycling team applies DevOps and agile methods
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 Gains New SDN, High-Performance Features
  • Scaling AMQ 7 Brokers with AMQ Interconnect

    Red Hat JBoss AMQ Interconnect provides flexible routing of messages between AMQP-enabled endpoints, including clients, brokers, and standalone services. With a single connection to a network of AMQ Interconnect routers, a client can exchange messages with any other endpoint connected to the network.

    AMQ Interconnect can create various topologies to manage a high volume of traffic or define an elastic network in front of AMQ 7 brokers. This article shows a sample AMQ Interconnect topology for scaling AMQ 7 brokers easily.

    AMQ Interconnect does not use master-slave clusters for high availability. It is typically deployed in topologies of multiple routers with redundant network paths, which it uses to provide reliable connectivity. AMQ Interconnect can distribute messaging workloads across the network and achieve new levels of scale with very low latency.

    The router accepts AMQP protocol–based connections from clients and creates AMQP connections to brokers or AMQP services. The router classifies incoming AMQP messages and routes the messages between message producers and message consumers.

    A messaging client can make a single AMQP connection into a messaging bus built with routers, and over that connection it can exchange messages with one or more message brokers connected to any router in the network. At the same time, the client can exchange messages directly with other endpoints without involving a broker at all.s

  • Advisory: Red Hat DHCP Client Command Injection Trouble

Server Hype Waves: Serverless, Kubernetes, Docker

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  • Red Hat's Serverless Blockchain Future Powered by Open Source Innovation [Ed: "Serverless" is a myth. Serverless means servers you do not control at all. Back to mainframes and worse.]

    On the final day of the Red Hat Summit last week, Red Hat CTO Chris Wright presided over the closing keynotes where he outlined how his company innovates and hinted at multiple future product developments.

  • Kubernetes as a Service Built on OpenStack

    In this video from the 2018 Swiss HPC Conference, Saverio Proto from SWITCH presents: Kubernetes as a Service Built on OpenStack.

  • Docker is the dangerous gamble which we will regret

    Docker strikes me as a direction that one day will be seen as a mistake. The strongest arguments for it are that it might be a standard if it can mature, and it offers a bandaid for many of the other failures that the tech industry is currently suffering from. Those are bad reasons to love Docker.

Bigger than Linux: The rise of cloud native

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The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s first KubeCon + CloudNativeCon of the year took place in the Bella Center, Copenhagen. A giant greenhouse of a building with snaking industrial pipework and connecting concrete bridges; it's a vast container made of glass letting in light. A suitable setting for an industry that’s evolved rapidly from the release of Docker’s superstar container technology back in 2013.

Attendance has rocketed to 4,300, according to Dan Kohn, executive director of the CNCF, which almost triples attendance from a year ago in Berlin, but that’s not surprising as cloud native computing industry is meeting the business world’s demand for more scalable, agile applications and services that can be run across multiple geographical locations in distributed environments.

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OpenStack: SUSE's and Red Hat's Takes

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  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud 8 to Accelerate Customer Software-Defined Infrastructure Deployments
  • SUSE's OpenStack Cloud 8 and SUSE-Ready Certification for SUSE CaaS, Cosmic Cuttlefish, Android Things and More

    SUSE's OpenStack Cloud 8 made its debut last week. This is the "first release to integrate the best of SUSE OpenStack Cloud and HPE OpenStack technology, which was acquired by SUSE last year". Other enhancements include "greater flexibility for customers with full support for OpenStack Ironic", "expanded interoperability with new support for VMware NSX-V", "enhanced scalability to support large deployments" and more.

  • A modern hybrid cloud platform for innovation: Containers on Cloud with Openshift on OpenStack

    Market trends show that due to long application life-cycles and the high cost of change, enterprises will be dealing with a mix of bare-metal, virtualized, and containerized applications for many years to come. This is true even as greenfield investment moves to a more container-focused approach.

    Red Hat® OpenStack® Platform provides a solution to the problem of managing large scale infrastructure which is not immediately solved by containers or the systems that orchestrate them.

    In the OpenStack world, everything can be automated. If you want to provision a VM, a storage volume, a new subnet or a firewall rule, all these tasks can be achieved using an easy to use UI or with a command line interface, leveraging Openstack API’s. All these infrastructure needs might require a ticket, some internal processing, and could take weeks. Now such provisioning could all be done with a script or a playbook, and could be completely automated. 

  • Why we use tests on OpenStack package builds in RDO

    Unit tests are used to verify that individual units of source code work according to a defined specification (spec). While this may sound complicated to understand, in short it means that we try to verify that each part of our source code works as expected, without having to run the full program they belong to.

    All OpenStack projects come with their own set of unit tests, for example, this is the unit test folder for the oslo.config project. Those tests are executed when a new patch is proposed for review, to ensure that existing (or new) functionality is not broken with the new code. For example, if you check this review, you can see that one of the continuous integration jobs executed is “openstack-tox-py27”, which runs unit tests using Python 2.7.

Post-KubeCon Kubernetes Coverage

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  • Google’s Kelsey Hightower: Kubernetes needs startups to thrive

    Can the rising tide in open-source computing lift all the boats in the business? Kelsey Hightower (pictured), co-chair of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and advocate for the Google Cloud Platform, thinks so.

    Hightower’s tolerant view on collaboration may have surprised even the most open-minded attendees of this week’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU conference last week, when Hightower’s keynote demonstrated Kubernetes, the open-source system for deploying containerized applications, on rival cloud platforms.

    “When I was using Amazon S3 in my presentation, I was showing people the dream of serverless — here’s how this stuff actually works together right now,” Hightower said. “We don’t really need anything else from the cloud providers. I’m not here just to represent Google and sell for Google. I’m here to say, ‘Here’s what’s possible.’”

  • Kubernetes and microservices: A developers’ movement to make the web faster, stable, and more open

    The four years that William Morgan spent as an engineer at Twitter battling the Fail Whale gave him a painful view into what happens when a company’s rickety web infrastructure gets spread too thin. But while Twitter’s instability was highly publicized, Morgan realized that the phenomenon existed to some degree across the web as companies were building applications in ways that were never intended to handle such scale.

    The result: Applications and software were becoming too expensive, too hard to manage, required too many developers, were too slow to deploy, and caused too much downtime.

  • KubeCon 2018: Action call issued to all of world’s open source developers

    Who runs the world? You might say governments (or the people), Beyoncé might say girls, but in technology, developers are taking the front sit.

    From enterprise applications to consumer apps, these are the people who build the software that allows IoT to run, AI to happen and edge computing to spread.

    Their role has become so important that companies have entered nearly into a ‘race to arms’ when it comes to employing developers. Take Volkswagen for example, the car manufacturer had 24 months ago nearly to none developers and today employs more than 100.

KubeCon and CloudNativeCon Coverage/Wrapups

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  • Kubernetes stands at an important inflection point

    Last week at KubeCon and CloudNativeCon in Copenhagen, we saw an open source community coming together, full of vim and vigor and radiating positive energy as it recognized its growing clout in the enterprise world. Kubernetes, which came out of Google just a few years ago, has gained acceptance and popularity astonishingly rapidly — and that has raised both a sense of possibility and a boat load of questions.

  • Everything announced at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018

    More than 4,300 developers gathered in Copenhagen this past week for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, a conference focused on the use of Kubernetes, microservices, containers, and other open sourced tools for building applications for the web. Throughout the week, companies in attendance made a slew of announcements regarding new products and services for cloud native computing.

  • IBM CTO Defines Multi-Cloud Reality at KubeCon Europe

    The term "multi-cloud" is often heard at IT conferences today, but what does it really mean and is it a future state or something that is real today?

    In a video interview with eWEEK at the KubeCon and CloudNativeCon Europe 2018 event here, Jason McGee, vice president and CTO of IBM Cloud Platform, detailed the modern reality of multi-cloud and how Kubernetes fits in.

    "Multi-cloud is real and it's here today, from the standpoint that most large organizations already have multiple cloud destinations that they are using," McGee said.

  • How the Kubernetes Release Team Works

    As a community project, Kubernetes also has a community process for how releases are managed and delivered.

    At the KubeCon and CloudNativeCon Europe 2018 event, Jaice Singer DuMarsOSS Governance Program Manager and Caleb Miles  technical program manager at Google outlined the core process and activities of the Kubernetes Release Special Interest Group (SIG).

    "Fundamentally and philosophically a release is representative of a critical bond between a project and its community," DuMars said. "At the heart of that is that is really a covenant of trust and on the release team or anything to do with releasing you are actually holder of that trust."

Kubernetes Event/News

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  • Kubernetes in Europe: The most significant news from Kubecon this week

    The Kubernetes train stops in Europe this week, as over 4,000 attendees attend keynote sessions and technical talks that continue through Friday on containers, container-orchestration, microservices, and even serverless computing at Kubecon and CloudNativeCon in Copenhagen.

  • Cisco embraces Kubernetes, pushing container software into mainstream

    Kubernetes, originally designed by Google, is an open-source-based system for developing and orchestrating containerized applications. Containers can be deployed across multiple server hosts and Kubernetes orchestration lets customers build application services that span multiple containers, schedule those containers across a cluster, scale those containers and manage the container health.

  • Google Kubeflow, machine learning for Kubernetes, begins to take shape

    Ever since Google created Kubernetes as an open source container orchestration tool, it has seen it blossom in ways it might never have imagined. As the project gains in popularity, we are seeing many adjunct programs develop. Today, Google announced the release of version 0.1 of the Kubeflow open source tool, which is designed to bring machine learning to Kubernetes containers.

  • Cloud-Native Technologies That Made an Impression at KubeCon EU 2018
  • Cisco’s Wide And Deep Embrace Of Kubernetes

    As enterprises continue to spread their workloads around – keeping some in their core datacenters while placing others in either private clouds or sprinkling them among disparate public clouds – the portability, visibility and management of those applications becomes an issue. There is no standardization among public cloud providers like Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform, among others, and applications that run well in an on-premises datacenter may hit some rough patches when they migrate to the cloud. Developers also are finding challenges when moving applications into production, either in the datacenter or cloud, also come with their share of challenges.

  • Google and New Relic announce new Kubernetes services

    We continue our summary of vendor announcements from the Kubernetes Conference + CloudFirst Conference Europe with a pair of press releases from Google and New Relic.

  • Google Tool Monitors Cloud-Hosted, On-Premises Kubernetes Clusters

    Organizations using the Kubernetes platform to build and deploy container applications now have a new option for monitoring the environment for performance-impacting bugs, bottlenecks and abnormal behavior.

    Google this week announced the beta release of Stackdriver Kubernetes Monitoring for aggregating logs event data and other metrics from Kubernetes environments. Developers and operations teams can use the data to understand—in near real time—how an application is performing in production and to quickly identify issues that might impact performance.

  • Where Kubernetes Is Headed and Why Boring Is Good

    At the Kubecon and CloudNativecon Europe 2018 day two keynotes on May 3, speakers discussed Kubernetes success stories and what's coming next.

    Aparna Sinha, group product manager at Google, outlined the core areas of concern that are leading feature development in future Kubernetes releases. She noted the top three issues the Kubernetes community is working on are security, application enablement and providing a better experience for developers.

HPE partners with Red Hat to bring containers to production

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Having trouble bringing containers into production? Red Hat and Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) have an answer. They're optimizing Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP), Red Hat's Kubernetes container orchestration platform, on HPE platforms, including HPE Synergy.

Sure, it's easy to deploy containerized applications in development and test environments, but it's not so easy in enterprise-sized production environments. Enterprises often require container scalability, added security features, persistent storage, and manageability to deploy containers in production. To help speed up container application delivery, HPE and Red Hat are collaborating in what HPE calls the industry's "first composable infrastructure".

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Kubernetes Event Coverage

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