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Servers: Containers, Xen and Databases

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  • Cloud Foundry Goes All-In With Kubernetes

    Further proof probably isn't needed to confirm that Kubernetes has become the de facto standard when it comes to container orchestration, but if you need more, the Cloud Foundry Foundation announced this week that it has taken on two new Kubernetes-focused projects.

  • Xen & Databases

    I'm running PostgreSQL and MySQL on my server that both serve different databases to Wordpress, Drupal, Piwigo, Friendica, Mastodon, whatever...

    In the past the databases where colocated in my mailserver VM whereas the webserver was running on a different VM. Somewhen I moved the databases from domU to dom0, maybe because I thought that the databases would be faster running on direct disk I/O in the dom0 environment, but can't remember the exact rasons anymore.

    However, in the meantime the size of the databases grew and the number of the VMs did, too. MySQL and PostgreSQL are both configured/optimized to run with 16 GB of memory in dom0, but in the last months I experienced high disk I/O especially for MySQL and slow I/O performance in all the domU VMs because of that.

PostgreSQL 11 Almost Ready

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  • PostgreSQL 11 RC1 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first release candidate of PostgreSQL 11 is now available for download. As a release candidate, PostgreSQL 11 RC 1 should be identical to the initial release of PostgreSQL 11, though some more fixes may be applied prior to the general availability of PostgreSQL 11.

  • PostgreSQL 11 RC1 Released Ahead Of Stable Release Next Week

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    One week from today will hopefully mark the release of the PostgreSQL 11 stable database server release.

    PostgreSQL 11.0 delivers more performance tuning optimizations with that work being never-ending. There are also various other improvements.

​Cloud Foundry embraces Kubernetes

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Cloud Foundry, a prominent open-source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, isn't giving up on BOSH its tool chain for release engineering, deployment, and life-cycle management of large scale distributed services. But Cloud Foundry is making it easier to use Kubernetes both independently and as part of BOSH.

The Cloud Foundry Foundation is doing this by accepting two new projects: Eirini and CF Containerization. This comes after last year's adoption of Cloud Foundry Container Runtime (CFCR), which started Cloud Foundry's integration of Kubernetes. CRCR makes it possible to deploy and manage Kubernetes clusters using the BOSH release engineering tool chain.

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Also: The Linux Foundation – Open Networking Summit Europe: Integrate | Automate | Accelerate

5 alerting and visualization tools for sysadmins

​IBM mainframe containers grow more secure

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Security

Of course, you can do a wee bit more with Secure Service Containers (SSC) on IBM LinuxONE and Z mainframes than you could on a 360 mainframe with a maximum of 1MB of memory. IBM Cloud Private is a Platform as a Service (PaaS) environment for developing and managing containerized applications. It's built on top of the Kubernetes container orchestrator Kubernetes.

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IBM Nabla Containers, Kubernetes 1.12 and Platform9 Open Sources Its Kubernetes Etcd Support Tool

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  • A New Method of Containment: IBM Nabla Containers

    In the previous post about Containers and Cloud Security, I noted that most of the tenants of a Cloud Service Provider (CSP) could safely not worry about the Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP) and leave the CSP to manage the risk. However, there is a small category of jobs (mostly in the financial and allied industries) where the damage done by a Horizontal Breach of the container cannot be adequately compensated by contractual remedies. For these cases, a team at IBM research has been looking at ways of reducing the HAP with a view to making containers more secure than hypervisors. For the impatient, the full open source release of the Nabla Containers technology is here and here, but for the more patient, let me explain what we did and why. We’ll have a follow on post about the measurement methodology for the HAP and how we proved better containment than even hypervisor solutions.

    The essence of the quest is a sandbox that emulates the interface between the runtime and the kernel (usually dubbed the syscall interface) with as little code as possible and a very narrow interface into the kernel itself.

  • Kubernetes 1.12 Arrives With TLS and Better Cloud Integrations

    The Kubernetes project has been hurtling at breakneck speed towards the boring. As the popular open source container orchestration platform has matured, it’s been the boring features which have come front and center, many of which focus on stability and reliability. For the Kubernetes 1.12 release on Thursday, those working on the project and on the various special interest groups (SIGs) initially laid out over 60 proposed features. A little over half of those made it to the final release, with many more being pushed back or delayed, as usual.

    Amongst the changes that made it into this release are such additions as the general availability of TLS bootstrapping, the ability to use the Kubernetes API to restore a volume from a volume snapshot data source, a newly beta version of the KubeletPluginsWatcher, and some groundwork which is being put in place to solve scheduling challenges that confront large clusters

  • Platform9 Open-Sources etcdadm, Enabling the Kubernetes Community to Easily Create and Manage Secure etcd Clusters, Anywhere

    Platform9, the leader in SaaS-managed hybrid clouds, today announced etcdadm – a new open source project available under the Apache v2.0 license...

  • Platform9 Open Sources Its Kubernetes Etcd Support Tool

    Platform9 pushed its etcdadm support tool out into the open source community via GitHub in an effort to generate momentum behind automating the configuration, deployment, and management of etcd clusters used by Kubernetes to store control plane information. Those tasks are currently either part of more broadly-focused efforts put on the shoulders of a Kubernetes user, or cobbled together by developers.

    Etcd is the primary storage location for Kubernetes and needs to be established before Kubernetes can be run on a system. Arun Sriraman, Kubernetes technical lead manager at Platform9, explained in a video that etcd is the “backbone for Kubernetes storage.”

Open-source boffins want to do for the IoT edge what Kubernetes did for containers

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Two high-profile open-source collaborations are putting their heads together to work out how to take Kubernetes, more familiar in hyperscale environments, out to Internet of Things edge computing projects.

The Kubernetes IoT Edge Working Group is the brainchild of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and the Eclipse Foundation.

Speaking to The Register, CNCF's Chris Aniszczyk said the idea of using Kubernetes as a control plane for IoT is "very attractive".

That sums up the brief of the working group, he said, "to take the concept of running containers, and expand that to the edge".

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Release of Kubernetes 1.12

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  • Kubernetes 1.12 Released

    Today, the Kubernetes Project released version 1.12. The big updates in this version are the general availability of TLS bootstrapping, a maturing story around scaling, and better multitenancy. Head on over to the CoreOS Blog to check out the full details of this release.

  • Welcome to Kubernetes 1.12

    Today, we celebrate this week’s release of Kubernetes 1.12, which brings a lot of incremental feature enhancements and bug fixes across the release that help close issues encountered by enterprises adopting modern containerized systems. Each release cycle, we’re frequently asked about the theme of the release. There are always exciting enhancements to highlight, but an important theme to note is trust and stability.

    The Kubernetes project has grown immensely over the last few years and has come to be respected as a leader in container orchestration and management solutions. With that stature comes the responsibility to build APIs and tools that are well-tested, easy to maintain, highly performant, and scalable; qualities that are trusted and stable. In each of the upcoming release cycles, we expect to continue to see a community effort around prioritizing the maturation and stabilization of existing functionality over the delivery of new features.

Postgres 11 - a First Look

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Postgres 11 is almost here, in fact the latest beta shipped today, and it features a lot of exciting improvements. If you want to get the full list of features it is definitely worth checking out the release notes, but for those who don’t read the release notes I put together a run down of some what I consider the highlight features.

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PostgreSQL 11 Beta 4 Released With JIT Compilation Disabled By Default

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The fourth and likely last beta release of PostgreSQL 11 is now available.

One of the headlining features of PostgreSQL 11 was the new LLVM JIT compiler option but as of a few days ago it's been disabled by default due to some performance problems and at this stage seeming to really only help long and complex queries. But for those wanting to try out this just-in-time support can easily enable it with a configuration option in this beta as well as for the final release.

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PostgreSQL 11: something for everyone

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PostgreSQL 11 had its third beta release on August 9; a fourth beta (or possibly a release candidate) is scheduled for mid-September. While the final release of the relational database-management system (currently slated for late September) will have something new for many users, its development cycle was notable for being a period when the community hit its stride in two strategic areas: partitioning and parallelism.

Partitioning and parallelism are touchstones for major relational database systems. Proprietary database vendors manage to extract a premium from a minority of users by upselling features in these areas. While PostgreSQL has had some of these "high-tier" items for many years (e.g., CREATE INDEX CONCURRENTLY, advanced replication functionality), the upcoming release expands the number considerably. I may be biased as a PostgreSQL major contributor and committer, but it seems to me that the belief that community-run database system projects are not competitive with their proprietary cousins when it comes to scaling enterprise workloads has become just about untenable.

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