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Server

Servers: SUSE, Boltron, Virtual Machines, Containers, and 'Cloud' Computing

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Server
SUSE
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Real Time boosts app performance

    a Linux kernel that also offers applications and tools to manage and support a real-time environment. The kernel uses different scheduler queues and makes a distinction between normal processes and real-time processes. If there is a shortage of available resources, the Linux kernel will service the real-time resources first.

  • Boltron - Fedora Modular OS playground!

    Last summer at Flock Langdon White, Ralph Bean and couple folks around them announced work on new release tools and a project called Modularity. The goal was simple but aspirational - for couple years we've talked about rings proposal, splitting applications from the core of the OS, having alternatives available and easily installable for certain components and even though for all of these usecases you could always find a way how to achieve them they weren't really supported by the build infrastructure and software management tools. Once you would update your system or install something else it would usually break or do something unexpected. Modularity goal was to come up with a straightforward way how to deliver a bulk of content thru our build pipeline, offer multiple versions of components and different installation profiles. At the same time this new approach to delivering content would not break existing workflows and will be super easy for package maintainers.

  • Fedora Modular Server "Boltron" Preview Release Now Available

    Fedora developers have announced the first preview release of Boltron, their Modular Server effort. Fedora Modular Server is aiming to separate the lifecycle of applications from each other and the operating system itself. This is part of Fedora's broader modularity efforts while this Boltron preview today is about the server components.

  • Serverless Computing May Offer Better Economics Than Virtual Machines

    Serverless computing is becoming yet another way for cloud service providers to parse out access to enterprises looking to take advantage of virtualized services. Think containers, only slightly different.

    Serverless computing architectures are designed to reduce the amount of overhead associated with offering services in the cloud. This includes the ability for a cloud provider to dynamically manage server resources.

  • This Week in Scalability: System Backups in the Container Era

    As we gear up to release our next e-book on the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine (check with us in about a month), we have been reviewing how well K8s has been making its way into the enterprise — the true determinant of whether the software becomes an essential component of “the new stack,” so to speak.

    Reviewing our notes from Kubecon 2017, held earlier this year in Berlin, we found some powerful testimonies from both Salesforce and Comcast. Salesforce is using it in a pilot program to power three cloud-native services, with plans to be running 20 services by the end of the year. When the company’s engineers were considering different orchestration options, they immediately appreciated the smarts behind the Kubernetes. After all, many had come from other jobs managing large at-scale workloads. “We were, frankly, blown away. The development velocity was incredible, even back then,” Salesforce Principal Architect Steve Sandke said of the developers behind Kubernetes. “These people clearly knew what they were doing.”

  • Federal Cloud Computing

    Open source software (OSS) and cloud computing are distinctly different concepts that have independently grown in use, both in the public and private sectors, but have each faced adoption challenges by federal agencies. Both OSS and cloud computing individually offer potential benefits for federal agencies to improve their efficiency, agility, and innovation, by enabling them to be more responsive to new or changing requirements in their missions and business operations. OSS improves the way the federal government develops and also distributes software and provides an opportunity to reduce costs through the reuse of existing source code, whereas cloud computing improves the utilization of resources and enables a faster service delivery.

Servers: Boltron, OpenStack, and GoDaddy

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Server
  • Announcing Boltron: The Modular Server Preview

    The Modularity and Server Working Groups are very excited to announce the availability of the Boltron Preview Release. Boltron is a bit of an anomaly in the Fedora world — somewhere between a Spin and a preview for the future of Fedora Server Edition. You can find it, warts (known issues) and all, by following the directions below to grab a copy and try it out.

    Fedora’s Modularity Working Group (and others) have been working for a while on a Fedora Objective. The Objective is generically called “Modularity,” and its crux is to allow users to safely access the right versions of what they want. However, there are two major aspects of “accessing the right versions.”

  • What you need to know about hybrid cloud

    At the center of hybrid cloud solutions sits open source software, such as OpenStack, that deploys and manages large networks of virtual machines. Since its initial release in October 2010, OpenStack has been thriving globally. Some of its integrated projects and tools handle core cloud computing services, such as compute, networking, storage, and identity, while dozens of other projects can be bundled together with OpenStack to create unique and deployable hybrid cloud solutions.

  • GoDaddy Drops Curtain on Its Cloud Business… Again

    Launched only a year ago, Cloud Servers was never intended to go after the big guys — AWS, Azure, GCP, and the like — and had no dreams of competing for well-heeled, big-business customers. Instead, it was hoping to position itself as a gateway to the cloud for small and medium sized businesses wanting to test the waters. In other words, it was hoping to take on DigitalOcean and Linode. It was also undoubtedly hoping to leverage the substantial base of its hosting business and convince some of those customers that their lives would only improve if they made a move to the cloud.

Server: Virtualization Trends, GoDaddy Pulls out of OpenStack

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Server
  • Top five virtualization trends of 2017

    July marks the second half of the year, making it an ideal time to reflect upon what the journey through 2017 has been like and where it is going. With respect to virtualization, developers have played an increasingly important role in how companies deal with network agility, flexibility and security. While the direction data centers will head over the next six months remains open, a handful of virtualization trends are shaping the path forward.

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  • GoDaddy Terminates Its OpenStack Cloud Server Business

    Hosting vendor GoDaddy first debuted its own OpenStack-powered cloud service in March 2016, with high hopes of success. Those hopes have been dashed, as GoDaddy sent out notices to its customers this week advising them that the service will be shut down.

Servers: Containers, SOA, Microservices, and 'Cloud'

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Server
SUSE
  • Docker Leads OCI Release of v1.0 Runtime and Image Format Specifications

    Today marks an important milestone for the Open Container Initiative (OCI) with the release of the OCI v1.0 runtime and image specifications – a journey that Docker has been central in driving and navigating over the last two years. It has been our goal to provide low-level standards as building blocks for the community, customers and the broader industry. To understand the significance of this milestone, let’s take a look at the history of Docker’s growth and progress in developing industry-standard container technologies.

  • The Difference Between SOA and Microservices Isn’t Size

    For those that have been in the technology industry for some time, there is a tendency to compare or even equate the current microservices phenomenon with the more archaic Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach. This is done implicitly in many cases, but also quite explicitly with statements such as “microservices is nothing more than the new SOA” or “Amazon is the only company to get SOA right.”

    This is unsurprising, because it’s rooted in fact. For all of its other faults, SOA was a vision of enterprises that looks remarkably like what progressive organizations are building today with cloud native architectures composed of, among other things, microservices. Stripped to its core, SOA was the idea that architectures should be composed of services rather than monolithic applications.

  • First supported Linux for SAP HANA on Google Cloud

    With the addition of Google Cloud Platform, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is now available on three major public cloud providers, including Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

CoreOS, OCI Unveil Controversial Open Container Industry Standard

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OS
Server

CoreOS and the Open Container Initiative on Wednesday introduced image and runtime specifications largely based on Docker's image format technology.

However, OCI's decision to model the standard on Docker's de facto platform has raised questions. Some critics have argued for other options.

Version 1.0 provides a stable standard for application containers, according to Brandon Philips, CTO at CoreOS and chair of the OCI Technical Oversight Board.

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Open Container Initiative (OCI) 1.0

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Linux
Server

Why you should become a sysadmin

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GNU
Linux
Server

Chances are good that you are already an administrator for some systems you own, and you do it for free because that's just how it goes these days. But there are employers willing and eager to pay good money for someone to help administer their systems. We're currently near zero unemployment in system and network administration, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects continued 9% growth in the field through 2024.

What about automation, you ask. Perhaps you've heard sysadmins say how they intend to automate away their entire job, or how they automated their predecessor's job in a single shell script. How many have you heard of that succeeding? When the job is automation, there is always more to automate.

If you attend or watch videos of sysadmin conferences, you'll see a field that needs new blood. Not only is there a distinct lack of younger people, but also fairly extreme gender and racial imbalances. While those are topics for a different article, diversity is well proven to improve resilience, problem-solving, innovation, and decision-making—things of great interest to sysadmins.

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Server: Containers, Cloud Native, Microservices, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP)

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Server
  • It’s an ever more open world. How containers and open source will transform the data centre beyond recognition

    The value of open source is changing business roadmaps previously built on fixed terms. More control, end of vendor lock-in and constant updates are just some of the benefits of the open world, Abby Kearns, executive director at the Cloud Foundry Foundation tells João Marques Lima.

  • Observability for Cloud Native

    Although JSON/YAML Kubernetes manifests are straightforward to read and write, they are not always the best way to manage applications on your cluster. If you have a complex, production system and want to modify its deployment with existing approaches, you may experience significant operational costs.

  • Decentralizing Your Microservices Organization

    Adaptability — the ability to quickly and easily change — has become a primary goal for modern businesses and has put pressure on technology teams to build platforms that are easier and less costly to change.  Working in such environments, these teams have been attracted more and more to the microservices style of software architecture.  What attracts them is the promise of a method for expediting changes to software, without introducing unnecessary danger to the business.

  • Google Cloud Platform expands to London

    With 43 zones, Amazon Web Services (AWS) is the globe's largest public cloud, but Google is working hard to match AWS. On July 13, Google opened its latest region, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) London (europe-west2).

    This is Google tenth region and joins its existing European region in Belgium. The London GCP center will have three zones. It will offer compute, big data, storage, and networking service.

    Google expects its new region to greatly improve network performance for British Isles and Western Europe clients. In cities such as London, Dublin, Edinburgh, and Amsterdam, Google's performance testing shows 40-percent to 82-percent reductions in round-trip time latency when serving customers from London compared with the Belgium region.

Why Is Docker So Popular? Explaining the Rise of Containers and Docker

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Server

By now, you've almost certainly heard of Docker containers. You know Docker is massively popular. But do you know why? Here's a look at the factors driving tremendous interest in Docker today.

Before delving into a discussion of the factors behind Docker's popularity, it's worth noting that Docker is not the only container platform out there. Nor was it the first to come along.

Other frameworks, like OpenVZ and LXC, were available starting in the mid-2000s. Other container-like technologies, such as FreeBSD jails, go back even further. Docker was released only in 2013, making it a very young technology compared to most of today's mainstream enterprise technologies.

Curiously, however, it was Docker, not a more mature container platform, that has risen to massive prominence over the past few years. That's an outcome worth pondering -- for the purposes both of understanding what makes containers in general so popular, as well as why Docker in particular has succeeded so spectacularly, whereas alternative container frameworks have seen little adoption.

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Ceph: Block Storage for the 21st Century

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Server

Storage used to be so simple. You had a Single Large Expensive Drive (SLED) and you stored all your data on it.

Then, we moved on to redundant arrays of inexpensive disks (RAID), and things got more complex. But, it was still pretty easy. Unless you were using Small Computer System Interface (SCSI). I still get the heebie-jeebies thinking about chaining SCSI drives together.

But, even as hard drives were replaced by solid-state drives (SSD), physical drives couldn’t keep up with modern server data needs, never mind those of clouds and containers. This is where Ceph, and software-defined storage (SDS) have stepped in.

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Google Chrome 60 Released

DRM-Carrying Flash's Death in the News

  • Google: HTML is Faster, Safer, and More Power Efficient Than Adobe's Flash
    After Adobe's big announcement this morning that they plan to end support for Flash in late 2020, Google Chrome's Anthony Laforge published a blog article asking Flash developers to start transitioning to HTML. For a long time, Google shipped its Chrome web browser built-in with Flash support, but it now looks like Chrome will slowly start blocking Flash content, require explicit permission from users, until upstream support is terminated three years from now, at the end of 2020. Google, like anyone else on this planet, believe HTML is faster, safer, and more power efficient than Flash, without a doubt.
  • Adobe Flash will die by 2020, Adobe and browser makers say
     

    For many, though, Flash was simply seen at least as a nuisance, and at worst a serious security risk.   

     

    Flash-based exploits have circulated for years, in a game of cat-and-mouse between hackers and Adobe itself. Apple's Steve Jobs famously banned Flash from the iPhone, claiming that Flash hurt battery life and also was a security risk. [...]

  • Adobe Flash is dead (well, nearly)
     

    Tech firms have long been hammering nail's into its coffin, too, and back in 2010, Steve Jobs famously penned a letter that called for the demise of Adobe Flash in favour of a shift to open web standards.

  • The end of Flash

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V
    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1. It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements
    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement
    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.