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Servers and Containers

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  • Weaveworks Advances Container Services Platform in Enterprise Edition

    Alexis Richardson is a big advocate of the emerging cloud native computing paradigm, serving as the chair of the Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). At his day job, he is the CEO and co-founder of Weaveworks, which is aiming to build a cloud native business, providing organizations with a platform to monitor and manage cloud native deployments.

  • Blockchain for IoT Extends Beyond Ensuring Security

    Blockchain, the technology that made Bitcoin possible, has been getting a lot of attention in the IoT world, often because of its role in security. However, experts and practitioners said the potential of blockchain for IoT is deeper and broader than just keeping the bad guys out.

    Ian Hughes, analyst of IoT at 451 Research, sees a role for blockchain that goes deeper, enabling authentication of devices -- especially when they are connected infrequently, as the case might be with, say, agricultural systems that may shut down for large parts of the year. Having a blockchain distributed ledger can provide a tidy way to account for and recognize the return of long-lost network participants as trusted members.

  • Cilium Project Aims to Improve Container Networking Security

    Wendlandt left VMware in March 2016 to become a partner at venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, where he remained until December. In January 2017, Wendlandt officially moved over to his new startup, known as Covalent, which is still in its stealth mode, though it is now clear what the company is focused on.

    At the Kubecon/Cloud Native Con EU event in Germany last week, Wendlandt was staffing the booth for an open-source networking project called Cilium, which is being backed by his new startup Covalent.

  • Version 5 of RHEL, CentOS and Scientific Linux are now dead

Containers/Servers

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  • Distelli aims to improve multi-cloud software development with new open-source container registry [Ed: Not much to do with "open source" but a fine example of openwashing]

    The popular Docker container technology is now vital in developing software optimized for the cloud. Docker allows developers to bundle together pieces of an application to run smoothly across different platforms and devices. Singh, who worked at Amazon for nine years and was one of the earliest to join the AWS team before founding Distelli, says he understands the customer need for running in multiple clouds. With Europa, Distelli wants to provide the tools and technology to make that easier.

  • How Docker Containers Help Save Money

    By now, you probably know how popular Docker containers are with technical folks. But do you understand the business case for Docker? Do you know how containers help save companies money? If not, read on.

    Docker became popular in its early days because it simplifies the work of developers and admins in important ways. Containers provide environment parity, which makes it easier to find bugs before they reach end-users. Containers also help developers to deploy software more quickly.

  • Microservices With Continuous Delivery Using Docker and Jenkins

    Docker, microservices, Continuous Delivery are currently some of the most popular topics in the world of programming. In an environment consisting of dozens of microservices communicating with each other, it seems to be particularly important the automation of the testing, building, and deployment process. Docker is an excellent solution for microservices because it can create and run isolated containers with service.

  • CNCF Accepts Both Docker’s containerd and CoreOS’ rkt as Incubation Projects

    In a unanimous voting process that concluded Wednesday during KubeCon in Berlin, The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s Technical Oversight Committee approved Docker Inc.’s motion to donate containerd — the current incarnation of its core container runtime — as an official CNCF incubation project. In the same meeting, the TOC also voted unanimously to adopt CoreOS’ rkt container runtime, as well.

    “Container orchestrators need community-driven container runtimes,” reads a formal statement from CNCF Executive Director Dan Kohn Wednesday, “and we are excited to have containerd which is used today by everyone running Docker. Becoming a part of CNCF unlocks new opportunities for broader collaboration within the ecosystem.”

  • Deploying Microservices to a Cluster with gRPC and Kubernetes

    Although it is true that microservices follow the UNIX philosophy of writing short compact programs that do one thing and do it well, and that they bring a lot of advantages to a framework (e.g., continuous deployment, decentralization, scalability, polyglot development, maintainability, robustness, security, etc.), getting thousands of microservices up and running on a cluster and correctly communicating with each other and the outside world is challenging. In this talk from Node.js Interactive, Sandeep Dinesh -- a Developer Advocate at Google Cloud -- describes how you can successfully deploy microservices to a cluster using technologies that Google developed: Kubernetes and gRPC.

  • Scalable Microservices with gRPC, Kubernetes, and Docker by Sandeep Dinesh, Google

Containers News

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  • Linux kernel holds key for advanced container networking

    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier.

    Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.

  • The major changes that make Docker container services enterprise-ready

    Docker isn't what it used to be. New security tools, orchestration changes, native Docker support for Windows and the release of LXD are some modifications that are worth knowing about.

  • Why Choose Kubernetes to Manage Containerized Applications?

    We're learning about Kubernetes in this series, and why it is a good choice for managing your containerized applications. In part 1, we talked about what Kubernetes does, and its architecture. Now we'll compare Kubernetes to competing container managers.

How to have a Linux home server on the cheap

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Linux
Server

Ask any Linux enthusiast, and they’ll tell you how awesome an operating system Linux can be. (Well, except Bryan Lunduke, who will say it sucks before he says it’s awesome.) For the desktop user, the freedom from worry about most viruses is a big plus, and not spending $100 upgrading Windows is a big plus too.

As awesome as Linux is for desktop use, Linux (and BSD for that matter) truly shines as a server. While providing web-based services is one of those server-y things Linux does really well, Linux can do a lot more than host a blog about family outings.

If you’re looking to host your own services instead of paying for or relying on those in the cloud, running your own home server is one of the best ways to keep your files private.

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Servers/Back End

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Linux/FOSS/Containers on Servers

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  • Docker at Four: The State of the Docker Ecosystem from 2013 to Today

    Docker containers turned four years old this month. If you were paying attention to Docker in its early days, you know that the Docker ecosystem today looks nothing like it did then. Here's how the Docker world has evolved since Docker's launch in 2013.

  • Kubernetes Federation in a Post-Configuration Management Universe

    When containerization was young, one of its early principles was the ideal of immutable infrastructure, the ability to build a support structure for a container that was flexible enough to meet the container’s needs during its lifespan, which may be short, but remained a fixed asset throughout that duration.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Welcomes Containerd and Rkt as New Projects

    At the CloudNative/Kubecon EU event in Berlin on March 29, the big news was that Docker contributed its containerd runtime, while CoreOS contributed its rkt (pronounced rocket) runtime to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The containerd and rkt projects are rival container runtimes that aim to implement specifications that are being formally defined by the Open Container Initiative (OCI) project.

  • Why Kubernetes Sucks and How to Fix It

    Joe Beda is in a better position than most to understand what's wrong with Kubernetes. Beda helped to start the Kubernetes project while he was at Google; he now runs a startup called Heptio that is aiming to help further enable Kubernetes.

    At the Kubecon / CloudNative EU conference in Berlin, Beda delivered a keynote address on what needs to change in Kubernetes to bring in more users.

Docker/Kubernetes/Containers

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  • Containerization Leaders Explore Possible Standardized Data Storage Interface

    A group of engineers from every leading container orchestrator maker have gathered together, virtually, around an initiative to explore a common lexicon for container-based data storage. Initially proposed by Mesosphere’s Benjamin Hindman, the Container Storage Interface initiative — which, for now, is essentially a GitHub document — is exploring the issue of whether the community at large, and their users, would benefit from a standardized API for addressing and managing storage volumes.

  • What are the top open source tools for Docker management?
  • Enterprise container DevOps steps up its game with Kubernetes 1.6

    Managing containers isn't easy. That's where such programs as Docker swarm mode, Kubernetes, and Mesosphere can make or break your containers initiatives. Perhaps the most popular of these, Kubernetes, has a new release, Kubernetes 1.6, that expands its reach by 50 percent to 5,000 node clusters. Conservatively, that means Kubernetes can manage 25,000 Docker containers at once.

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)

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Server
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Google Chrome 60 Released

DRM-Carrying Flash's Death in the News

  • Google: HTML is Faster, Safer, and More Power Efficient Than Adobe's Flash
    After Adobe's big announcement this morning that they plan to end support for Flash in late 2020, Google Chrome's Anthony Laforge published a blog article asking Flash developers to start transitioning to HTML. For a long time, Google shipped its Chrome web browser built-in with Flash support, but it now looks like Chrome will slowly start blocking Flash content, require explicit permission from users, until upstream support is terminated three years from now, at the end of 2020. Google, like anyone else on this planet, believe HTML is faster, safer, and more power efficient than Flash, without a doubt.
  • Adobe Flash will die by 2020, Adobe and browser makers say
     

    For many, though, Flash was simply seen at least as a nuisance, and at worst a serious security risk.   

     

    Flash-based exploits have circulated for years, in a game of cat-and-mouse between hackers and Adobe itself. Apple's Steve Jobs famously banned Flash from the iPhone, claiming that Flash hurt battery life and also was a security risk. [...]

  • Adobe Flash is dead (well, nearly)
     

    Tech firms have long been hammering nail's into its coffin, too, and back in 2010, Steve Jobs famously penned a letter that called for the demise of Adobe Flash in favour of a shift to open web standards.

  • The end of Flash

FreeBSD 11.1 Released

  • FreeBSD 11.1 Operating System Debuts to Support 2nd Generation Microsoft Hyper-V
    The FreeBSD Project announced today the release and immediate availability of the first incremental update to the FreeBSD 11 operating system series, FreeBSD 11.1. It's been more than nine months since FreeBSD 11 was released as the latest and most advanced version of the widely-used and most popular BSD operating system on the market, and now, FreeBSD 11.1 is here with a bunch of new features across multiple components, as well as all the latest security and bug fixes.
  • FreeBSD 11.1 Debuts With LLVM/Clang 4, ZFS Improvements
    FreeBSD 11.1 is now available as the first point release to FreeBSD 11.
  • FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE Announcement
    The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE. This is the second release of the stable/11 branch.