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How containers will shape the Drupal ecosystem

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Server
Drupal

I recently had the opportunity to interview David Strauss about how Pantheon uses containers to isolate many Drupal applications from development to production environments. His upcoming DrupalCon talk, PHP Containers at Scale: 5K Containers per Server, will give us an idea of the techniques for defining and configuring containers to get the most out of our infrastructure resources.

Having recently dove into the container realm myself, I wanted to learn from the experts about the challenges of managing containers in a production environment. Running millions of production containers related to Drupal, David is certainly an expert resource to ask about this subject. I look forward to learning more details at DrupalCon!

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Containers and Microservices Force VMware To Ship A Linux Distribution

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Linux
Server

VMware is the most unusual and unexpected player in the industry to ship a Linux distribution. Here is an analysis of what forced the virtualization giant to make this move.

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No Linux, no Docker, no cloud OS? Think again

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OS
Server

Operating systems like CoreOS and Joyent's SmartOS/Triton have worked to redefine, in radically different ways, what an OS needs to be to run applications at scale in the cloud.

Now another OS is set to join the ranks of those trying to do the cloud-OS thing in a maverick way: OSv, an open source, hypervisor-optimized OS "designed to run an application stack without getting in the way."

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Red Hat’s Atomic command turns Docker images into software-delivery mechanisms

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Red Hat
Server

Red Hat is looking to improve upon Docker’s software-delivery mechanism with the Atomic command feature of its Atomic Host operating system for Linux containers.

Last month, Red Hat released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL7) Atomic Host, a version of the enterprise operating system expressly designed to run containers. The “Atomic command” feature defines entry points for Project Atomic hosts, delivered via Docker container, with the goal of filling the software-delivery gaps in Linux container implementations.

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Ubuntu 15.04 container-friendly Linux for cloud and servers arrives soon

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Server
Ubuntu

Don't look now but Ubuntu has become the Linux for clouds. On the AmazonElastic Compute Cloud (EC2), for example, Ubuntu is the most popular operating system by an almost two to one margin. 64 percent of production OpenStack users have also chosen Ubuntu to stay on top. Canonical, Ubuntu's parent company, is adding even more cloud and container functionality to the next version, Ubuntu 15.04.

With this release, Canonical is adding a new snappy Ubuntu Core. This light-weight Linux is designed for transactional systems, such as cloud container hosts, and smart devices for the Internet of Things. The new Ubuntu will also include updated developer tools and the latest frameworks, languages, databases and packages. On top of this, Canonical's adding its new container-based hypervisor, LXD.

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VMware fires Photon torpedo – a homegrown Linux for microservices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

VMware has created its very own Linux distribution, dubbed 'Project Photon', as part of an effort to create a stack for what it's calling “Cloud-Native applications”.

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Also:

OpenStack: Can the open-source platform still win private cloud?

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Server
OSS

"I think that doing open source work in a full committee style is often like pouring 1,000 engineers into a barrel and hoping they'll produce the works of Shakespeare. The monkeys in the barrel just don't manage to get it together, everybody wants to be the king and the directions and the priorities change.

"It's a very different situation to something like Linux, where you have a benevolent dictator Linus Torvalds controlling everything, or like Docker, where there is a corporate entity ultimately controlling the road map."

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MariaDB tackles 'endless growth' with open-source database

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Server
OSS

MariaDB has announced the Spring 2015 release of MariaDB Enterprise, which will include new scalability and security capabilities.

Research from Wikibon has predicted that the Big Data database market will reach $4.5 billion in 2017, which represents a large rise from $2.7bn in 2014. It is expected that SQP will represent 64% of the database market.

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Also: ​MariaDB Corp picks off speed bottlenecks and tightens anti-SQL injection measures

Google sticks anti-SQL injection vaccine into MySQL MariaDB fork

MariaDB adds high availability, scalability and security capabilities to enterprise MySQL database

Do your switches run Cumulus Linux? Puppet will pull your strings

Filed under
Linux
Server

Cumulus Networks, home of a Linux-of-choice for white-box switches, has linked arms with Puppet Labs and joined its Puppet Supported Program.

While it's “just another” certification from one angle, Puppet's Carl Caum told The Register it's important to the company.

He said while there are plenty of tools to manage equipment in the software-defined networks (SDN) space, these pieces of software can only work via the equipment vendors' APIs – the networking devices themselves remain black boxes.

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Press release: Puppet Labs, Cumulus Networks and Dell Partner to Extend SDN to More Devices in the Data Center

Open Xchange teams with PowerDNS and Dovecot to create open source powerhouse

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

OPEN-XCHANGE, the security conscious open source white label productivity provider from Germany, has announced a three-way merger to create one of the largest open source companies in Europe.

The deal sees the company join up with Dutch DNS software vendor PowerDNS and Finnish IMAP server provider Dovecot to form a pan-European powerhouse.

The new deal sees the combined Open-Xchange take a 90 percent market share in the secure DNS market and some 130 million user accounts.

We caught up with Open-Xchange CEO Rafael Laguna to get his thoughts on the news, starting with the advantages that the combined company will bring to the open source market.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more

Red Hat and Fedora News

4MLinux 26.0 BETA released.

4MLinux 26.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages, including major changes in the core of the system, which now uses the GNU C Library 2.27 and the GNU Compiler Collection 7.3.0. Read more