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Oracle: Liberating Java EE and Joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

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Development
Server
  • Red Hat Gives Thumbs Up to Java EE's Move to Eclipse

    So Java Enterprise Edition has a new home.

    Yesterday Oracle announced it's turning control of the platform over to the nonprofit Eclipse Foundation. On the surface, this makes a lot of sense, as the foundation's namesake project is the most widely used Java IDE. The announcement came just a month after Oracle said it was considering moving control of the platform to an open source foundation.

    All of the details have yet to be ironed-out, but in a blog Oracle's David Delabassee said that Oracle-led Java EE and related GlassFish technologies, including RIs, TCKs, and associated project documentation, will be re-licensed to the foundation, presumably under the Eclipse Public License. In addition, the project will be rebranded with a not yet determined new name.

  • Java EE to Eclipse: A Welcome Move

    In a blog post on the venerable Aquarium blog (started by the Glassfish team at Sun a decade or so ago) Oracle has announced that it has selected the Eclipse Foundation as the new home for Java EE. They will relicense and rename it and invent a new standards process. It looks like the MicroProfile rebellion was successful as this has all been negotiated with Red Hat and IBM as well.

    I don’t see this move as “dumping” Java EE. Moving a project to an open source Foundation is complex and expensive and Oracle should be congratulated on finally committing to this move. Java EE has already been uploaded to GitHub, but that’s not sufficient as the default Github Governance is isolation mediated via pull requests.

    Eclipse is an extremely good choice of host. It has evolved excellent governance that recognises both the primacy of technical contribution and the inevitability of corporate politics and keeps both in balance. It’s ideally suited to the complexities and politics of Java EE, having hosted multiple large projects and survived de-investment by its founder IBM. Under the smart and firm leadership of Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse is the perfect home for Java EE (or whatever Oracle will want us to call it).

  • Oracle opens up enterprise Java and moves it to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Java EE Is Moving to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Tech’s old guard continues to embrace Kubernetes, as Oracle joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Oracle has always been a little more pragmatic about the role of open-source software in the tech industry than a company like Microsoft, which fought the very concept tooth and nail for years. Still, now that both companies have joined the foundation at the heart of one of the most important open-source projects in enterprise tech at the moment, it’s another sign the center of gravity has shifted.

  • ​Oracle joins the Kubernetes movement

    Oracle joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and released Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and its own Kubernetes cloud installer.

IBM’s 'New Gen' LinuxONE

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GNU
Linux
Server

Kubernetes/Containers Adoption Rising

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Server
  • Why developer evangelism is the secret to the success of Kubernetes

    Kubernetes is the hottest thing to hit containers since...Docker. That's faint praise, given that Docker barely burst onto the scene in 2013. But, given the pace of enterprise infrastructure innovation these days, four years may be all the limelight one gets. As such, it's critical to make the most of an opportunity, which Kubernetes has done by delivering great code and, as I've called out, superior community.

  • Containers Use in Production Workloads Ticks Up Slowly

    Docker and other container platforms have caught the attention of enterprise software development teams and IT departments, but relatively few are entrusting their production workloads to the technology.

    According to the Cloud Foundry Foundation's latest Global Perception Study, 25 percent of enterprises are using containers in production, a three percent increase compared to 2016. Forty-two percent of respondents said their organizations were currently evaluating container technologies.

Servers: Mesosphere, ​NGINX, and Systemd on Ubuntu 16.04

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Server

Servers: MAAS, Logging, and Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) Open OnDemand 1.0

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Server
OSS
  • MAAS Development Update – Aug 21st – Set 1st
  • A checklist for building your enterprise logging layer

    In any discussion about big-picture topics such as cloud migration services, data centers, and microservices, the topic of enterprise logging can get relegated to an afterthought. But you do so at your peril, because without logging, you won't have critical visibility into your services in order to diagnose and debug efficiently. What's more, if you're a large enterprise, you may be violating compliance requirements.

  • Ohio Supercomputer Center releases open-source HPC access portal

    An innovative web-based portal for accessing high performance computing services has matured beyond the beta phase and now is available to HPC centers worldwide.

    The Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) has launched Open OnDemand 1.0, an open-source version of OSC OnDemand, the Center's online, single-point-of-entry application for HPC services.

    Open OnDemand is an NSF-funded project to develop a widely shareable web portal that provides HPC centers with advanced web and graphical interface capabilities. Through OnDemand, HPC clients can upload and download files, create, edit, submit and monitor jobs, run GUI applications and connect via SSH, all via a web browser, with no client software to install and configure.

Solaris to Linux Migration 2017 Amid Layoffs

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OS
Server
  • Solaris to Linux Migration 2017

    Many people have contacted me recently about switching from Solaris (or illumos) to Linux, especially since most of the Solaris kernel team were let go this year (including my former colleagues, I'm sorry to hear). This includes many great engineers who I'm sure will excel in whatever they choose to work on next. They have been asking me about Linux because I've worked for years on each platform: Solaris, illumos, and Linux, in all cases full time and as a subject matter expert. I've also done some work on BSD, which is another compelling choice, but I'll discuss that another time. The following is my opinion and not an official guide to any OS.

    Switching from Solaris to Linux has become much easier in the last two years, with Linux developments in ZFS, Zones, and DTrace. I've been contributing (out of necessity), including porting my DTraceToolkit tools to Linux, which also work on BSD. What follows are topics that may be of interest to anyone looking to migrate their systems and skillset: scan these to find topics that interest you.

  • Oracle staff report big layoffs across Solaris, SPARC teams
  • Sun set: Oracle closes down last Sun product lines

    None of this is a real surprise. Oracle had cut former Sun engineers and developers by a thousand employees in January. In Oracle's most recent SPARC/Solaris roadmap, the next generation Solaris 12 had been replaced by Solaris 11.next and SPARC next -- incremental upgrades.

    Former Sun executive Bryan Cantrill reported, based on his conversations with current Solaris team members, that Oracle's latest layoffs were, "So deep as to be fatal: The core Solaris engineering organization lost on the order of 90 percent of its people, including essentially all management." James Gosling, Java's creator, summed it up: "Solaris ... got a bullet in the head from Oracle on Friday."

GNU/Linux Distros for Enterprise Servers

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Server
  • Review: 5 top Linux distros for enterprise servers

    Linux distros are plentiful, and choosing the right server product can be a daunting task. Are you looking for a supported product, or can you go with a free version? Need Cloud support or virtualization? We’ll try to provide some answers.

    Although many Linux distros can quite capably be configured to run as a server, for this review we focused solely on dedicated server products, named and supported as such.

  • Review: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 cloud-friendly, but pricey management tools

    If you need comprehensive support, the comfort of having a well-established Linux vendor on your side and you have the budget to pay for it, then you should give Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 a careful look.

    It is should also get your attention if you’re looking for an operating environment that embraces the cloud, from tools to build your infrastructure to management platforms.

  • Review: Considering Oracle Linux is a no-brainer if you’re an Oracle shop

    Oracle Linux has been around for more than 10 years, but has been gaining market share and the company says it has over 14,000 customers world-wide.

    Part of its popularity may be the way it plays well within an Oracle environment and its full support for Red Hat Linux, on which it is based.

A Comparison of Linux Container Images

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Server
OSS

Going back to basics, there are two major parts of an operating system – the kernel and the user space. The kernel is a special program executed directly on the hardware or virtual machine – it controls access to resources and schedules process. The other major part is the user space – this is the set of files, including libraries, interpreters, and programs that you see when you log into a server and list the contents of a directory such as /usr or /lib.

Linux containers essentially break the two pieces of an operating system up even further allowing the two pieces to be managed independently – the container host and the container image. The container host is made up of an operating system kernel and a small user space that has a minimal set of libraries and daemons necessary to run containers. The container image is made up of the libraries, interpreters, and configuration files of an operating system user space, as well as the developer’s application code.

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Server: CephFS and Container News

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Server
  • What you should know about CephFS

    Today, new storage system interfaces are created regularly to resolve emerging challenges in distributed storage. For example, Amazon Simple Storage Service [S3] (an opaque object store) and Amazon Elastic Block Storage [EBS] (a virtual machine image provider) both provide an essential, scalable storage service within a cloud ecosystem; however even with these new technologies, the conventional file system remains the most-widely used storage interface in computing.

    Virtually all programs are written to use a file system at some level. This makes the file system the lingua franca for all storage access on any computing device—from small devices such as smartphones, to large high-performance computing (HPC) clusters at CERN and national labs. Programs are still written to communicate and store data through file systems because of their convenience, familiarity, and interoperability.

  • Finding a digital transformation roadmap with containers

    But to make containers actually work, you need to use them in the right way. Creating a digital transformation roadmap with containers is not as simple as installing Docker and letting everything else fall into place on its own.

  • DH2i Adds Docker Support to App Portability Platform for Windows and Linux
  • DH2i Launches DxEnterprise v17 - Unified Smart Availability™ for Windows, Linux & Docker

Server: Serverless, Containers, and SysAdmin Careers

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Server
  • This Week in Numbers: Serverless Adoption on Par with Containers

    Serverless technologies like functions as a service (FaaS) are in use by 43 percent of enterprises that both have a significant number of strategic workloads running in the public cloud workloads and the ability to dynamically manage them.

    Without those qualifications, it is easy to misinterpret the findings from New Relic’s survey-based ebook “Achieving Serverless Success with Dynamic Cloud and DevOps.” After digging in, we found that the survey says 70 percent of enterprises have migrated a significant number of workloads to the public cloud. Among this group, 39 percent of using serverless, 40 percent are using containers and 34 percent are using container orchestration.

  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Configuration and Automation

    System administrators looking to differentiate themselves from the pack are increasingly getting cloud computing certification or picking up skills with configuration management tools. From Puppet, to Chef to Ansible, powerful configuration management tools can arm sysadmins with new skills such as cloud provisioning, application monitoring and management, and countless types of automation.

    Configuration management platforms and tools have converged directly with the world of open source. In fact, several of the best tools are fully free and open source. From server orchestration to securely delivering high-availability applications, open source tools such as Chef and Puppet can bring organizations enormous efficiency boosts.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos