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New OpenStack cloud release embraces bare metal

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Server
OSS

OpenStack is getting bigger than ever. It now powers more than 75 public cloud data centers and thousands of private clouds at a scale of more than 10 million compute cores. But it's always been hard to upgrade from one version of OpenStack to another, and it's been hard to deploy on bare metals. With OpenStack 18, Rocky, both problems are much easier to deal with now.

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Server: Kubernetes, Hummingbird at Rackspace, Containers

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  • Kubernetes Development Infrastructure Moving Out of Google Control

    Google helped to create the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation in July 2015 with the contribution of the Kubernetes container orchestration system. Although Google contributed Kubernetes, it was still running the core infrastructure for building, developing and testing Kubernetes—until now.

    On Aug. 29 at the Linux Foundation's Open Source Summit here, the CNCF and Google announced that Kubernetes development will be moving to the CNCF's control in an effort to further enable multicloud development. Alongside the move, Google announced that it is donating $9 million in Google Cloud Platform credits to enable the CNCF to run Kubernetes developments for the next three years.

  • The shutdown of the project Hummingbird at Rackspace

    On reflection, I suspect their chances would be better if they were serious about interoperating with Swift. The performance gains that they demonstrated were quite impressive. But their paymasters at RAX weren't into this community development and open-source toys (not that RAX went through the change of ownership while Hummingbird was going on).

  • The container future is here. It’s just not evenly distributed

    Science fiction writer William Gibson once said, “The future is already here -- it’s just not evenly distributed.” He was explaining that things we once thought of as futuristic already were a reality for some people, but not everyone.

    He may as well have been talking about adoption of Linux containers within the federal government.

    While evidence suggests that the public sector’s interest in Linux containers continues to grow, many agencies remain on the fence. Whether due to budget, lack of information or other constraints, government adoption of Linux containers has been slower than it has been in the commercial space. Many agencies continue to view containers as exclusively for the cool kids in Silicon Valley.

Oracle Solaris 11.4

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OS
Server
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Released for General Availability

    I'm pleased to announce the release of Oracle Solaris 11.4. Of the four releases of Oracle Solaris that I've been involved in, this is the best one yet!

    Oracle Solaris is the trusted business platform that you depend on. Oracle Solaris 11 gives you consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure.

  • Solaris 11.4 released

    Congrats to my colleagues in the Solaris team who released Solaris 11.4 today. Despite the 11.x moniker, this is actually a major Solaris release; Oracle has just decided to go down the perpetual macOS X / Windows 10 version numbering route from now on. (This development is unlikely to faze Solaris veterans, who have been using SunOS 5.x since 1992.)

  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Officially Released

    Two years after Solaris 11.3 and Oracle opting for a "continuous delivery" model of 11.next updates instead of a "Solaris 12", Solaris 11.4 is out the door today.

    Oracle is talking up Solaris 11.4 with its general availability release as "the trusted business platform", "consistent compatibility, is simple to use and is designed to always be secure", "more than 3,000 applications certified to run on it", and "the only operating system that has completed UNIX V7 certification."

Is Kubernetes free as an open source software?

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OSS

So, is Kubernetes free?

Yes, but also no.

Pure open source Kubernetes is free and can be downloaded from its repository on GitHub. Administrators must build and deploy the Kubernetes release to a local system or cluster or to a system or cluster in a public cloud, such as AWS, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) or Microsoft Azure.

While the pure Kubernetes distribution is free to download, there are always costs involved with open source software. Without professional support, Kubernetes adopters need to pay in-house staff for help or contract someone knowledgeable. The Kubernetes admin needs a detailed working knowledge of Kubernetes software build creation and deployment within a Linux environment.

In effect, users need to know what they're getting into before they adopt open source software in the enterprise.

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Containers: Aqua Security and a Primer

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  • Aqua Security Open Sources Container Pen Test

    Aqua Security is trying to level the container security playing field by making available as an open source project an open source edition of a penetration testing tool designed specifically for container clusters.

    Rani Osnat, vice president of product marketing for Aqua Security, says kube-hunter is an automated penetration testing tool that developers and cybersecurity teams can employ to discover vulnerabilities within containers.

    That tool is designed to be run in two modes. Passive hunters run by default and are designed to execute a series of tests that probe for potential access points within your cluster. An active hunting mode then can be employed to execute additional tests against any weaknesses found with the passive hunter. Results from those tests are then shown on a website hosted by Aqua Security.

  • Getting started with Linux containers

    A major drawback of an OS-based model is that it is slow, and to deploy a new application, IT administrators might need to install a new server, which incurs operational costs and requires time.

    When every application has its own copy of the OS, operations are often inefficient. For example, to guarantee security, every application needs its own dedicated server, which results in lots of under-utilized hardware in the data center.

    A container is an isolated environment where the OS uses namespaces to create barriers. Linux containers have all the necessary components to run an application and make it easy to run a container on top of an operating system.

    From a hardware standpoint, containers utilize resources more efficiently. If there is still hardware capacity available, containers can use that and admins won't need to install a new server.

Open Metrics Project Comes to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

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Linux
Server

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) is expanding its roster, announcing that it has accepted the Open Metrics project as a Sandbox effort.

The CNCF Sandbox is a place for early-stage projects, and it was first announced in March. The Sandbox replaces what had originally been called the Inception project level.

With Open Metrics, Richard Hartmann, technical architect at SpaceNet, Prometheus team member, and founder of OpenMetrics, aims to bring useful metrics to cloud-native deployments. At its core, Open Metrics is an effort to develop a neutral metrics exposition format.

"OpenMetrics does not limit or define what metrics to send, on purpose," Hartmann told ServerWatch. "What it does do is define an efficient way to transport those metrics over the wire, and a flexible and powerful way to attach information to them: label sets."

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5 open source tools for container security

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OSS

As containers become an almost ubiquitous method of packaging and deploying applications, the instances of malware have increased. Securing containers is now a top priority for DevOps engineers. Fortunately, a number of open source programs are available that scan containers and container images. Let’s look at five such tools.

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Prometheus Milestone

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Server

Microservices and Microsoft Screwing With Kubernetes

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Server
Microsoft
  • 3 tips for moving your team to a microservices architecture

    Microservices are gaining in popularity and providing new ways for tech companies to improve their services for end users. But what impact does the shift to microservices have on team culture and morale? What issues should CTOs, developers, and project managers consider when the best technological choice is a move to microservices?

    Below you’ll find key advice and insight from CTOs and project leads as they reflect on their experiences with team culture and microservices.

  • Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service mucked my cluster!

    Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) was launched to world+dog in June, however, a few disgruntled customers say the managed container confection isn't fully baked yet.

    In a blog post published on Monday, Prashant Deva, creator of an app and infrastructure monitoring service called DripStat, savaged AKS, calling it "an alpha service marked as GA [generally available] by Microsoft."

    Deva said he moved his company's production workload to AKS last month, and has been plagued by random DNS failures for domains outside of Azure and hostnames inside the Azure Virtual Network.

    He characterized the response from Microsoft support – advice not to use excessive memory and CPU resources – as ridiculous, and said Microsoft failed to respond when told the DNS issues occurred mainly during application startup when memory and CPU usage is minimal.

Server: Kontron, D-R, Istio, 'Serverless', BeeGFS

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Server
  • Kontron Acquires Inocybe Technologies to Boost Cloud Native Networking Stack

    Kontron announced on Aug. 1 that it is acquiring privately-held networking vendor Inocybe Technologies. Financial terms of the deal have not been publicly disclosed.

    Inocybe is well known in the open source networking community for its support and contributions, particularly to the OpenDayLight (ODL) Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller. Inocybe has also been a leading contributor to the OpenSwitch project as well.

  • How to Lead a Disaster Recovery Exercise For Your On-Call Team

    On-call teams at startups have three big problems: they’re small, they cover a wide breadth of infrastructure, and the last two points usually imply that they lack the bandwidth to maintain and write documentation for a suite of DevOps tools. At SigOpt, our on-call team tackles these challenges with a biannual “disaster recovery exercise”, or simulated outage.

    In this blog post I will show you what a disaster recovery exercise is, how it can diagnose weak points in your infrastructure, and how it can be a learning experience for your on-call team. I hope that by the end you’ll consider running a disaster recovery exercise for your on-call team!

  • Istio Service Mesh Advances to Production

    Istio, the “service mesh” intended to connect application components and thereby boost the capabilities of the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator, has advanced over the past year as a way of managing increasingly popular micro-services.

    Partners Google Cloud, IBM (NYSE: IBM), ride sharer Lyft and Red Hat’s CoreOS unit along with other open source developers announced the 1.0 release of Istio on Tuesday (July 31). Among the goals is simplifying enterprise deployment of micro-services and allowing developers to add, change and route them within cloud-native applications. This, proponents said, can be done without having to update code or rebuild the underlying application containers.

  • Meet Serverless Inc. - The Startup That Aims To Accelerate Serverless Computing
  • Google advances Istio – this could be bigger than Kubernetes and serverless

    As modern digital computing infrastructure continues to evolve, new layers of automation enable increasingly rapid change and adaptation. Once containerization had made it possible to deploy new capabilities in seconds, then the advent of Kubernetes and similar tools added a layer of orchestration to co-ordinate container deployments at scale. A by-product was the easy abstraction of functions into a ‘serverless’ model, where the service was just there, on demand, in the infrastructure. Now a new layer known as the ‘service mesh’ is coming into being to add governance, management and communication across all of these capabilities. This week saw the release of version 1.0 of a new open source framework for service mesh known as Istio, backed, like Kubernetes before it, by Google, along with IBM.

  • Advanced HPC Announces Its Exclusive Platinum Partnership with BeeGFS

    Christopher M. Sullivan is the Assistant Director for Biocomputing at Oregon State University and directs the Center for Genome Research and Biocomputing (CGRB). He says BeeGFS has given CGRB a way to distribute their research across a parallel system while keeping the storage space looking like a single container. “BeeGFS is a robust solution that expands our storage space, gives us higher performance with phenomenal management and all at a cost-effective price.”

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Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler. Read more

This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a “C-SKY Linux Development Board” for $5.60 and up, featuring a RISC-V derived, 574MHz C-SKY GX6605S CK610M SoC, 64MB DDR2, an HDMI port, and 2x USB 2.0 ports. Last month, Hangzhou C-SKY Microsystems Co. announced Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel support for its new RISC-V based C-SKY CK810 SoC design. Now, Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a development board that runs Linux on a similar CK610M SoC. The C-SKY Linux Development Board sells for 39-40 Yuan ($5.60 to $7.05) on Taobao and $19.50 to $21.50 on AliExpress. Read more