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Ceph: Block Storage for the 21st Century

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Server

Storage used to be so simple. You had a Single Large Expensive Drive (SLED) and you stored all your data on it.

Then, we moved on to redundant arrays of inexpensive disks (RAID), and things got more complex. But, it was still pretty easy. Unless you were using Small Computer System Interface (SCSI). I still get the heebie-jeebies thinking about chaining SCSI drives together.

But, even as hard drives were replaced by solid-state drives (SSD), physical drives couldn’t keep up with modern server data needs, never mind those of clouds and containers. This is where Ceph, and software-defined storage (SDS) have stepped in.

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Fedora 26 Brings New Boltron Modularity Technology to Linux Servers

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Red Hat
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The Fedora Linux community is set to release its second major milestone release of 2017 on July 11, with the debut of Fedora 26.

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How Linux containers have evolved

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Linux
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In the past few years, containers have become a hot topic among not just developers, but also enterprises. This growing interest has caused an increased need for security improvements and hardening, and preparing for scaleability and interoperability. This has necessitated a lot of engineering, and here's the story of how much of that engineering has happened at an enterprise level at Red Hat.

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Oracle and Red Hat News

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Red Hat
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New Kubernetes Release and Older Docker News

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Server
OSS
  • Kubernetes 1.7: Security Hardening, Stateful Application Updates and Extensibility

    Today we’re announcing Kubernetes 1.7, a milestone release that adds security, storage and extensibility features motivated by widespread production use of Kubernetes in the most demanding enterprise environments. 

    At-a-glance, security enhancements in this release include encrypted secrets, network policy for pod-to-pod communication, node authorizer to limit kubelet access and client / server TLS certificate rotation.

  • [Older] Moby and LinuxKit Open Source from Docker

    At the recent DockerCon event in Austin, Docker Inc announced two significant open source projects, Moby and LinuxKit. Moby essentially marks the split of Docker, the open source project from Docker Inc the company, with the docker/docker GitHub repo moved to moby/moby. LinuxKit provides a set of tools to build 'custom Linux subsystems that only include exactly the components the runtime platform requires'.

  • [Older] Docker Downsides: Container Cons to Consider before Adopting Docker

    Docker containers are massively popular -- and for good reason. But like any technology, Docker is not a silver bullet. It has its downsides, and it's important to understand them if you're considering migrating to Docker.

    Let me be clear that I think Docker is a great platform for many use cases. Docker containers are an excellent way to deploy microservices-based applications that are more modular and easier to manage. There are also security benefits to using containers, and containers consume system resources more efficiently.

FOSS Databases: Older News

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OSS
  • [Older] Crate.io Introduces CrateDB 2.0 Enterprise and Open Source Editions
  • [Older] CrateDB 2.0 Enterprise stresses security and monitoring—and open source

    When open source SQL database CrateDB first debuted, its professed mission was to deliver easy, fast analytics on reams of machine-generated data, while running in containerized, cloud-native environments.

    That mission hasn't changed with the release of version 2.0, but it has been expanded by way of an enterprise edition with pro-level features. Rather than distribute the enterprise edition as a closed-source, binary blob, the maker of CrateDB is offering it as open source to help speed uptake and participation.

  • [Older] New open source database designed for enterprise users

    Businesses are looking for database technology that increases their agility, scalability, security, and supports a range of different use cases, at the same time keeping down costs.

    On the other hand developers want a database that is open and extensible, and lets them easily develop many different types of application.

    Open source specialist MariaDB Corporation is looking to meet these conflicting demands with MariaDB TX 2.0, an open source transactional database solution for modern application development.

  • [Older] IBM's new platform readies open source databases for private cloud
  • [Older] IBM announces open source DBaaS on Power Systems

    Database as a Service solutions are on the rise. IBM is looking to take advantage of that and build momentum as the launch of POWER9 gets closer. The announcement will also appeal to many in the OpenStack community  especially those running OpenStack-based private clouds. It will be interesting to see how many of the other OpenStack distributions begin to offer this on their platforms.

Introduction to Kubernetes, New Release and Why It Matters

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Server
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  • Introduction to Kubernetes with Fedora

    The information technology world changes daily, and the demands of building scalable infrastructure become more important. Containers aren’t anything new these days, and have various uses and implementations. But what about building scalable, containerized applications? By itself, Docker and other tools don’t quite cut it, as far as building the infrastructure to support containers. How do you deploy, scale, and manage containerized applications in your infrastructure? This is where tools such as Kubernetes comes in. Kubernetes is an open source system that automates deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Kubernetes was originally developed by Google before being donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, a project of the Linux Foundation. This article gives a quick precursor to what Kubernetes is and what some of the buzzwords really mean.

  • Kubernetes 1.7 Debuts With Enhanced Security And Extensibility
  • Kubernetes: Why does it matter?

    Developing and deploying cloud-native applications has become very popular—for very good reasons. There are clear advantages to a process that allows rapid deployment and continuous delivery of bug fixes and new features, but there's a chicken-and-egg problem no one talks about: How do you get there from here? Building the infrastructure and developing processes to develop and maintain cloud-native applications—all from scratch—are non-trivial, time-intensive tasks.

    Kubernetes, a relatively new platform for running containerized workloads, addresses these problems. Originally an internal project within Google, Kubernetes was donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation in 2015 and has attracted developers from the open source community around the world. Kubernetes' design is based on 15 years of experience in running both production and development workloads. Since it is open source, anyone can download and use it and realize its benefits.

    So why is such a big fuss being made over Kubernetes? I believe that it hits a sweet spot between an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) solution, like OpenStack, and a full Platform as a Service (PaaS) resource where the lower-level runtime implementation is completely controlled by a vendor. Kubernetes provides the benefits of both worlds: abstractions to manage infrastructure, as well as tools and features to drill down to bare metal for troubleshooting.

Servers: Containers, Ansible, and Puppet

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OSS
  • Kubernetes 1.7 Improves Container Security and API Aggregation

    The open-source Kubernetes 1.7 release is now available, providing users with new features to help manage and secure container infrastructure.

    Kubernetes 1.7 is the second major release of the open-source container orchestration platform so far in 2017 and follows the Kubernetes 1.6 release that debuted in March at the CloudNative Con/Kubecon event in Berlin, Germany. The Kubernetes project was first developed by Google and has been an open-source project run by the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) since July 2015.

  • Why Portability is Not the Same Thing as Compatibility

    The Container Host *is* the Container Engine, and Container Image Compatibility Matters

    Have you ever wondered, how are containers are so portable? How it’s possible to run Ubuntu containers on CentOS, or Fedora containers on CoreOS? How is it that all of this just magically works? As long as I run the docker daemon on all of my hosts, everything will just work right? The answer is….no. I am here to break it to you – it’s not magic. I have said it before, and I will say it again, containers are just fancy Linux processes. There is not even a container object in the Linux kernel, there never has been. So, what does all of this mean?

  • LinchPin: A simplified cloud orchestration tool using Ansible

    Late last year, my team announced LinchPin, a hybrid cloud orchestration tool using Ansible. Provisioning cloud resources has never been easier or faster. With the power of Ansible behind LinchPin, and a focus on simplicity, many cloud resources are available at users' fingertips. In this article, I'll introduce LinchPin and look at how the project has matured in the past 10 months.

    Back when LinchPin was introduced, using the ansible-playbook command to run LinchPin was complex. Although that can still be accomplished, LinchPin now has a new front-end command-line user interface (CLI), which is written in Click and makes LinchPin even simpler than it was before.

  • Building Puppet's unofficial forge community

    A Puppet module might only be some 500 lines of code and a bunch of tests, but that doesn't mean it's effortless to maintain. Puppet modules should run on a range of operating systems and support a range of Puppet versions (and hence, Ruby versions)—and that in and of itself makes it quite challenging.

    So while a single person could easily write a Puppet module, what happens when that person gets sick? Changes jobs? Or simply loses interest?

Kubernetes 1.7 released

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Server
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If you're using containers in production, you know you need a DevOps tool to manage them. For many companies, Kubernetes is that program. The fast-developing, open-source, container-orchestration package has just released its newest version, Kubernetes 1.7, just over three months since the developers released Kubernetes 1.6.

Haven't heard of Kubernetes? You will. Natasha Woods, a Linux Foundation senior PR manager, asked, "What do Wink, Ancestry.com, Box, Buffer, GolfNow, and Ticketmaster have in common? The way they run their infrastructure. Taking a page from giants like Google, these companies are tapping into container orchestration technology Kubernetes."

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Docker 17.06 CE Debuts with Multi-Stage Container Builds

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At DockerCon 17 in April, Docker Inc made a series of large announcements, including a shift to a new model with the Moby Project to build the Docker Engine. Now in June, the first major release of Docker built with the Moby Project is available in the form of the Docker 17.06 Community Edition release.

The Moby Project is a refactoring of how Docker as a container platform is built, by breaking it down into aDocker series of community-focused efforts that includes LinuxKit and containerd among others.

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Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection. TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification. Read more Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

  • 10 Open Source Skills That Can Lead to Higher Pay
    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers. In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.
  • If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?
    For a growing number of people, data analysis is a central part of their job. Increased data availability, more powerful computing, and an emphasis on analytics-driven decision in business has made it a heyday for data science. According to a report from IBM, in 2015 there were 2.35 million openings for data analytics jobs in the US. It estimates that number will rise to 2.72 million by 2020. A significant share of people who crunch numbers for a living use Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet programs like Google Sheets. Others use proprietary statistical software like SAS, Stata, or SPSS that they often first learned in school.
  • std::bind
    In digging through the ASIO C++ library examples, I came across an actual use of std::bind. Its entry in cppreference seemed like buzzword salad, so I never previously had paid it any attention.

Visual revamp of GNOME To Do

I’m a fan of productivity. It is not a coincidence that I’m the maintainer of Calendar and To Do. And even though I’m not a power user, I’m a heavy user of productivity applications. For some time now, I’m finding the overall experience of GNOME To Do clumsy and far from ideal. Recently, I received a thank you email from a fellow user, and I asked they what they think that could be improved. It was not a surprise when they said To Do’s interface is clumsy too. Read more

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