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Server: Kubernetes, OpenStack, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

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  • 2017 Year in Review: Kubernetes Enables a Multi-Cloud World

    In 2017, there was one area of the cloud landscape that received more attention than nearly all others—Kubernetes. 

    Kubernetes' roots go back to 2014, when Google publicly released the open source code for the project. But it was 2017 when Kubernetes' popularity took off, with nearly every major IT vendor now backing the platform, even onetime rivals like Docker Inc.

    Kubernetes is an open-source project that provides container orchestration, deployment and management capabilities. While Kubernetes started off as a Google project and Google still contributes more code than anyone, it has been a multi-stakeholder effort run by the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) since July 2015.

  • OpenStack Foundation Embraces Containers With “Kata Containers”

    On Dec. 5, when the enthusiastic container community was getting ready for KubeCon, the OpenStack Foundation renewed its long-standing friendship with the announcement of a new effort called Kata Containers with the goal of unifying the speed and manageability of containers with the security advantages of virtual machines (VMs).

  • Linux resolutions for 2018

    It’s always a good idea to start a new year with renewed intentions to be even better users and administrators of our Linux systems. For auld lang syne (for the sake of old times), let's touch on some of the ways we might improve our system practices in 2018.

  • An overview of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) held its conference, KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, in December 2017. There were 4000 attendees at this gathering in Austin, Texas, more than all the previous KubeCons before, which shows the rapid growth of the community building around the tool that was announced by Google in 2014. Large corporations are also taking a larger part in the community, with major players in the industry joining the CNCF, which is a project of the Linux Foundation. The CNCF now features three of the largest cloud hosting businesses (Amazon, Google, and Microsoft), but also emerging companies from Asia like Baidu and Alibaba.

    In addition, KubeCon saw an impressive number of diversity scholarships, which "include free admission to KubeCon and a travel stipend of up to \$1,500, aimed at supporting those from traditionally underrepresented and/or marginalized groups in the technology and/or open source communities", according to Neil McAllister of CoreOS. The diversity team raised an impressive \$250,000 to bring 103 attendees to Austin from all over the world.

    We have looked into Kubernetes in the past but, considering the speed at which things are moving, it seems time to make an update on the projects surrounding this newly formed ecosystem.

Containers and Servers

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  • Kubeflow Project Tacks Machine Learning on Top of Kubernetes

    The Kubernetes community is extending the reach of the container orchestration platform into the field of machine learning.

    Kubeflow is an open source project that supports machine learning stacks on Kubernetes. The project is housed within the Kubernetes project, which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF is, of course, housed within the Linux Foundation.

  • Amazon Launches Amazon Linux 2

    This upgraded offering includes access to the latest 4.9 LTS kernel and was created for those who run enterprise or high-performance applications on Linux and, as such, was designed with performance, stability, and security in mind.

  • Kubernetes, standardization, and security dominated 2017 Linux container news

    The OCI, part of the Linux Foundation, launched in 2015 "for the express purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtime." Currently there are two specs: Runtime and Image, and both specs released version 1.0 in 2017.

Kubeflow Brings Machine Learning to Kubernetes

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Kubernetes at its' core is a container orchestration system. But simply running containers for their own sake has little purpose, at the end of the day what really matters are applications.

Among the most interesting and often challenges types of application workloads are machine learning, which can often be difficult to deploy and operate. On Dec. 21 the Kubeflow project was officially announced by Google engineers as a new stack to easily deploy and run machine learning workloads.

"The Kubeflow project is dedicated to making Machine Learning on Kubernetes easy, portable and scalable," the Kubeflow GitHub project pagestates. "Our goal is not to recreate other services, but to provide a straightforward way for spinning up best of breed OSS solutions."

Read more

Server: Kubernetes, Containers, Top 3 Linux Server Distros of 2018

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  • Open-Source Cloudify Delivers Multi-Stack Interoperability for Kubernetes & Robust Security, Bridging the Gap Between Application & Network Virtualization
  • The Commodity Container Story

    The focus maybe on AWS EKS, the managed Kubernetes offering. The future is with AWS Fargate and similar services

  • Keynote: Maximizing developer velocity with containers

    Containers are one of the most exciting technologies in the cloud right now. But when it comes to your IT strategy, where is the best place to start? With so many different options and configurations, it’s critical that you find the best possible strategy for your software stack.

    To answer these questions, Canonical’s VP of Product Development Dustin Kirkland and VMware Staff Engineer Sabari Murugesan presented at the SF Bay Area OpenStack User Group Meeting. You can watch the full talk here!

  • Top 3 Linux Server Distros of 2018

    While Linux might not be a consumer favorite product like Microsoft’s Windows is, Linux is the preferred operating system that administrators and tech savvy people choose. Linux is considered as the best platform by computer experts and that’s because Linux offers complete freedom alongside security and hardware support.

    The best thing about Linux is the fact that it supports a bunch of server distros. Unlike Microsoft’s Windows, Linux users get to choose from a plethora of server distros and pick the one which suits their needs the most. Nonetheless, today we are going to present the best Linux server operating systems.

Containerd 1.0 Release Becomes the Public Face of Containers

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There may be a plurality of operative components inside an OCI standard container, though for now, two are of prime importance. The runc component is the executive — the part which makes a container functional unto itself. The second part of the puzzle, containerd acts as the part that “supervises” the lifecycle of containers, and that communicates with the outside world via API calls.

That functionality may replace the need for the continual presence of a full container engine in a production system, clearing the way for Kubernetes, Mesosphere DC/OS, and other container orchestration engines.

Read more

Also: Why Red Hat is Bullish on Containers

7 Best Linux Server Distros You Need To Use | 2018 Edition

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When it comes to the popularity of different operating systems, Linux enjoys a better position in the servers market. Due to many unbeatable benefits like stability, security, freedom, and hardware support, Linux is often the favorite platform to work upon for system administrators and expert users. Just like other special uses (including gaming, programming, or hacking), the category of Linux server distros too is vast.

Read more

Also: Solus Devs Add Initial Snapd Support, Improvements to Linux Steam Integration

Containers and Kubernetes News

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  • Containers lecture

    Whilst trying to introduce containers, the approach I've taken is to work up the history of Web site/server/app hosting from physical hosting and via Virtual Machines. This gives you the context for their popularity, but I find VMs are not the best way to explain container technology. I prefer to go the other way and look at a process on a multi-user system, the problems due to lack of isolation and steadily build up the isolation available with tools like chroot, etc.

  • As Kubernetes surged in popularity in 2017, it created a vibrant ecosystem

    Kubernetes is actually an open source project, originally developed at Google, which is managed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Over the last year, we’ve seen some of the biggest names in tech flocking to the CNCF including AWS, Oracle, Microsoft and others, in large part because they want to have some influence over the development of Kubernetes.

  • Ops Checklist for Monitoring Kubernetes at Scale

    By design, the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is not self-monitoring, and a bare installation will typically only have a subset of the monitoring tooling that you will need. In a previous post, we covered the five tools for monitoring Kubernetes in production, at scale, as per recommendations from Kenzan.

  • Kubernetes 1.9 brings beta support for Windows apps

    Kubernetes, the cloud container orchestration program, expands even further and has grown more stable.

  • Kubernetes Linux Container Orchestration System Now Supports Windows Too

    Kubernetes, the open-source, production-grade container orchestration system for automating scaling, deployment, and management of containerized apps, has been updated to version 1.9.

    Coming two and a half months after version 1.8, Kubernetes 1.9 is here with a bunch of new features like the general availability of the Apps Workloads API (Application Programming Interface), which is enabled by default to provide long-running stateful and stateless workloads, as well as initial, beta support for Windows systems.

Linux Foundation: New Silver Members, OpenContrail, and Xen

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces 21 New Silver Members

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 21 Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

  • Juniper transfers OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation

    Juniper Networks is handing over the governance of the OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation.

    OpenContrail is an open source network virtualization platform aimed at cloud environments and dealing mainly with the control plane - responsible for traffic routing. Juniper will continue developing and selling a commercial, fully supported version of the software, called simply Contrail.

  • The Linux Foundation Simplifies Xen Hypervisor Usage

    Cloud service providers tend to favor various implementations of the open source Xen hypervisor because it’s simply not cost effective for them to pay to license a commercial hypervisor at scale. It’s not clear to what degree enterprise IT organizations will want to follow suit. But The Linux Foundation that oversees development of Xen aims to increase the appeal of Xen by making available a more streamlined version that is simpler to use.

    George Dunlap, a Xen Project Contributor and a senior engineer at Citrix, says version 4.10 of the Xen Hypervisor Project includes a new user interface in addition to a trusted computing base (TCB) that has been made smaller and, by extension, more secure. The expectation is that a more compact implementation of Xen will not only consume fewer system resources, but also reduce the overall attack surface exposed, says Dunlap. Those attributes should make Xen a more attractive option, for example, in Internet of Things (IoT) projects where licensing a commercial hypervisor is likely to prove cost prohibitive, adds Dunlap.

  • The Xen Project Welcomes Bitdefender to its Advisory Board

    The Xen Project, a project hosted at The Linux Foundation, today announced Bitdefender, a leading global cybersecurity technology company protecting 500 million users worldwide, is a new Advisory Board member. The Xen Project Advisory Board consists of major cloud companies, virtualization providers, enterprises, and silicon vendors, among others, that advise and support the development of Xen Project software for cloud computing, embedded, IoT use-cases, automotive and security applications.

  • Xen Project Member Spotlight: Bitdefender

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project, and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

What Are Containers and Why Should You Care?

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What are containers? Do you need them? Why? In this article, we aim to answer some of these basic questions.

But, to answer these questions, we need more questions. When you start considering how containers might fit into your world, you need to ask: Where do you develop your application? Where do you test it and where is it deployed?

Read more

Desktop, Atari, and Servers: Kdenlive, MX-17, Linux Mint 18.3 and More

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  • Kdenlive Video Editor Issues Final Major Update on Old Codebase

    A new version of open-source video editor Kdenlive is available to download.

    Kdenlive 17.12.0 is something of a bittersweet release as it’s likely to be the final major release using the current Kdenlive codebase.

    Again, like the last few releases, this update is primarily focused on bug fixes and stability. In particular this update solves some niggling issues with proxy clips, with the team highlight ‘smoother seeking‘ and ‘reduced memory usage‘ as a result.

    Those of us you impatient for new features and major improvements will be pleased to hear that work on the next-generation Kdenlive is continuing apace. Kdenlive 18.04 is (as you might guess) tentatively scheduled for formal release in April of 2018.

  • The Best Linux Apps & Distros of 2017

    So join us (ideally with from a warm glass of something non-offensive and sweet) as we take a tart look backwards through some key releases from the past 12 months.

    This list is not presented in any sort of order, and all of the entries were sourced from YOUR feedback to the survey we shared earlier in the week. If your favourite release didn’t make the list, it’s because not enough people voted for it!


  • MX-17 released December 15, 2017

    MX-17 final images are now available for download.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Boasts Updated Software Manager, Backup Tools
  • Ataribox Pre-Order Plan “Officially Paused”

    If you were hoping that today would be the day you’d get to throw $300 at your screen and snag a Linux-powered Ataribox games console …Well, we’ve some bad news.

    You may be aware that the Ataribox team said pre-orders for the Atari-branded games machine would go live today, December 14th.

  • Modernizing application delivery with container platforms

    Demands for faster production times, higher quality and more predictable cost management are posing significant challenges for development teams. In-house software development is essential in achieving these and other agency objectives. Exacerbating the demands on development teams is often the need to successfully release new applications, while also updating existing ones.

    From a technical aspect, at the center of the challenges for developers, is the need to reliably get software to run as it moves between computing environments. Containerization represents the best way for developers to accomplish this task, with containers driving operational efficiency and competitive advantages.

  • Building Open Source IoT Ecosystems
  • Invaluable tips and tricks for troubleshooting Linux
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