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Servers: TOP500, Kubernetes, Blockchain, and 'DevOps'

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  • Linux Finally Stands Alone on the TOP500 Supercomputer List [Ed: Finally? No. That happened in past years.]

    The new TOP500 list, which shows the 500 most powerful computer units in the entire world, shows some form of the Linux kernel powering every single machine that packs that kind of processing ability. Linux has already been the force behind most of the world’s most powerful computers for years, so this isn’t a surprising fact.

    What’s more surprising is how long it’s taken to get to this point since the kernel was only finally able to shove all other operating systems off the list back in November.

  • Why Kubernetes Is the New Application Server

    Have you ever wondered why you are deploying your multi-platform applications using containers? Is it just a matter of “following the hype”? In this article, I’m going to ask some provocative questions to make my case for Why Kubernetes is the new application server.

  • As Cloud Computing Providers Post Record Profits, One Company Wants to Make Them Obsolete

    Another blockchain-based startup, called AXEL, is similarly trying to wrest a portion of the cloud from large stakeholders—this time, cloud storage. By letting users set up their own remote storage devices, rather than paying an exorbitant monthly fee for access to a terabyte of storage space, AXEL users simply can buy a cheap terabyte drive, plug it in to their desktop at home and link it to their AXEL account—at that point, they have an entirely private connection to that HDD that allows full cloud access without even the possibility of outside interference or surveillance by the service provider. And if you want another five terabyte of cloud storage? It's as easy as buying five more terabytes of storage and hooking them up to the network. Since you own the drives, moving a file onto a linked drive takes zero upload time—it's in your cloud-linked folders, after all, and thus has nowhere else it needs to go.

  • How Important Is Open Source for DevOps, Really?

    Depending on your perspective, you might believe that DevOps and open source go hand in hand. Or you may think that, quite to the contrary, the two have little to do with each other. There are good arguments to be made for both interpretations.

  • Blockchain evolution: A quick guide and why open source is at the heart of it

    It isn't uncommon, when working on a new version of an open source project, to suffix it with "-ng", for "next generation." Fortunately, in their rapid evolution blockchains have so far avoided this naming pitfall. But in this evolutionary open source ecosystem, changes have been abundant, and good ideas have been picked up, remixed, and evolved between many different projects in a typical open source fashion.

    In this article, I will look at the different generations of blockchains and what ideas have emerged to address the problems the ecosystem has encountered. Of course, any attempt at classifying an ecosystem will have limits—and objectors—but it should provide a rough guide to the jungle of blockchain projects.

Servers: Containers, TOP500, Red Hat OpenStack Platform

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  • Containers: Debunking the myths

    Linux-based containers themselves are nothing new, but the community driven by Docker has recently become hugely popular across a large cross-section of technology users

  • Linux Powers ALL TOP500 Supercomputers In The World | US Beats China For #1

    Just recently we told you about the IBM Summit supercomputer that is developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the US. The computing beast is being called the most powerful supercomputer yet, beating China’s Sunway.

    Summit has tasted another bread of success as the TOP500 List of the world’s fastest supercomputers renews for the year 2018. It’s not surprising to see Summit ( with its Linpack score of 122.3 petaflops) taking the throne away from Sunway TaihuLight (Linpack score: 93 petaflops). But China still has the largest number of supercomputers on the list.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 is here!

    In the digital economy, IT organizations can be expected to deliver services anytime, anywhere, and to any device. IT speed, agility, and innovation can be critical to help stay ahead of your competition. Red Hat OpenStack Platform lets you build an on-premise cloud environment designed to accelerate your business, innovate faster, and empower your IT teams.

Cockpit 171

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Software

Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 171.

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Goodbye, Microsoft: Deleting Github and Azure

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Microsoft
  • Why GitLab Is Moving From Azure to Google Cloud Platform

    To old timers in the open source game, it might come as a surprise that a company like GitLab that's proud of it's open source roots would be using Azure to begin with. After all, wasn't distrust of Microsoft's ownership of GitHub the reason behind the mass exodus to GitLab earlier this month? While a "new" and more open source friendly Microsoft was undoubtedly one of the reasons why GitLab would even consider the move to Redmond's cloud -- the motivating factor was money.

  • postmarketOS is #movingtogitlab

    After learning that Microsoft will buy GitHub at the end of 2018, for a lot of people trust in GitHub was shattered like the glass of @opendata26's Sony Xperia Z2 Tablet. But independent of that, GitHub has always had a vendor lock-in with the user's issues and pull requests hidden behind a rate limited API instead of a proper export feature. And even if you managed to export it through that API, you can not host your own GitHub instance and modify it as you like because there is not even a partially open source version of it.

    We want to be in control of our own data. While we can't maintain a self-hosted solution at this point, at least we want to be able to create a public backup of all our > 1500 issues and pull requests once a week. After some discussion we ended up with gitlab.com as alternative, because its API allows to create a whole backups at once and we can import them into our own instance if we want to do that in the future. The workflow is similar to GitHub, so we expect a rather smooth transition compared to using something entirely different.

Server: 'DevOps', OpenStack and Kubernetes

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  • 13 must-read books to take your DevOps skills to the next level

    As many of you know, continuous learning is a critical part of DevOps. That's why we put together this list. These are only 13 books from a vast array of resources out there, sourced from the Open Source DevOps team. What books are you reading to fine tune your DevOps practice and skills? Tell us in the comments.

  • Playing nice with a host of tech-pushers pushed OpenStack close to edge

    If one thing stood out at OpenStack's Vancouver summit in May, it's that the open-source project isn't just about data centre-based cloud computing any more.

    When Rackspace and NASA founded OpenStack eight years back, they wanted it to drive more efficient computing in the data centre by delivering cloud computing resources on standard hardware.

    Since then, OpenStack has become commonplace for homegrown, on-premises cloud infrastructure. 72 per cent of the respondents to the OpenStack Foundation's October 2017 survey used it that way, and that's up from 62 per cent in 2015.

    Today, the OpenStack Foundation sees hardware architectures diversifying beyond commodity x86 platforms into GPUs, FPGAs and Arm-based systems. It also sees approaches to software becoming more complex as containers, microservices and serverless computing take hold, and it sees computing happening increasingly at the edge, outside the data centre.

  • ​Kubernetes keeps improving

    Why so many releases, so quickly? To make it better as fast as possible. In Kubernetes 1.11, the latest version of Kubernetes goes a long way toward addressing fundamental networking and storage requirements.

​Supercomputers: All Linux, all the time

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Linux
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Once more, if you want to run the fastest possible computer, the June 2018 TOP500 supercomputing ranking shows that Linux is the best of all operating systems. Every last one is running Linux.

Linux has dominated supercomputing for years. But, Linux only took over supercomputing lock, stock, and barrel in November 2017. That was the first time all of the TOP500 machines were running Linux. Before that IBM AIX, a Unix variant, was hanging on for dear life low on the list.

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Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

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  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement

    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly.

    "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."

  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]

     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.

  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers

    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM.

    Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Linux Networking Efforts Advances with New DPDK and OpenSwitch Releases

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The OpenSwitch project joined the Linux Foundation two years ago in June 2016. The Open Switch effort originally got its start in October 2015 as a Hewlett Packard (HP) led effort.

The new OPX 2.3 release provides feature enhancements for SNMP support and also adds support for Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) as well as Terminal Access Controller Access-Control System Plus (TACACS+) .

"The ability to install and operationalize individual protocol stacks as applications or micro-features facilitates the design of cost-conscious, composable networks (based on a mixture of best-of-breed hardware and software) that reduce failure domains and improve performance” Alley Hasan, OpenSwitch Project Governing Board chair, wrote in a statement. "The OpenSwitch community is committed to continue developing viable, turn-key solutions for data center operators, as well as for service provider edge and core architectures."

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GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

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  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud

    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform.

    And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.

  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source

    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Open source log management options for Linux distributions

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Linux
Server

If you run Linux, you're probably familiar with rsyslog and systemd-journald. However, if you oversee dozens of Linux servers and cloud instances, it's not realistic to dig into each individual log file. Graylog and Logcheck are two viable open source alternatives.

When you search for open source log management software, you will see that Graylog is one of the most adopted products. The program can be easily installed on common Linux distributions, including CentOS and Ubuntu, and is available as an appliance.

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More in Tux Machines

Kate/KTextEditor Picks Up Many Improvements To Enhance KDE Text Editing

Even with KDE's annual Akademy conference happening this past week in Vienna, KDE development has been going strong especially on the usability front. The Kate text editor and the KTextEditor component within KDE Frameworks 5 have been the largest benefactors of recent improvements. This KDE text editing code now has support for disabling syntax highlighting entirely if preferred. When using syntax highlighting, there have been many KTextEditor enhancements to improve the experience as well as improvements to the highlighting for a variety of languages from JavaScript to YAML to AppArmor files. Read more

KStars v2.9.8 released

KStars 2.9.8 is released for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. It is a hotfix release that contains bug fixes and stability improvements over the last release. Read more Also: KDE Itinerary - How did we get here?

today's leftovers and howtos

  • Project curl governance
    Over time, we've slowly been adjusting the curl project and its documentation so that we might at some point actually qualify to the CII open source Best Practices at silver level. We qualified at the base level a while ago as one of the first projects which did that. Recently, one of those issues we fixed was documenting the governance of the curl project. How exactly the curl project is run, what the key roles are and how decisions are made. That document is now in our git repo.
  • How to install OwnCloud 10 on CentOS 7 and RHEL 7
  • How to Get Google Camera Port for Asus ZenFone Max Pro M1
  • How to check your CentOS Version
  • 5 Practical Examples of chgrp command in Linux
  • Trinity Desktop R14.0.5 Brings Modern Compiler Support and Security Fixes
    Trinity Desktop, the Linux desktop environment which is forked from KDE 3, has just released an update bringing Trinity Desktop to version R14.0.5. Because Trinity Desktop is a “traditional desktop” based on KDE 3 and focuses on function rather than a lot of special effects, its benefits are typically things like increased battery life on laptops, and just overall efficiency for the user.
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 32
    I’m back from Akademy, and I can’t wait to share some of the cool stuff that happened there over the past week. I’m going to post the video of my talk as soon as it’s up. But first, I know what you’re all really waiting for: this week’s Usability & Productivity update. Though we were all quite busy, somehow everyone managed to accomplish an enormous amount of work, too!
  • Reminder: Shotwell Facebook publishing no longer working
    As announced earlier, since August 1st, 2018 Shotwell cannot publish to Facebook any more. The API that Shotwell used for that was removed and it is currently not clear to me how developers that do not use Android, iOS or Facebook’s web SDKs should provide similar functionality.
  • Gentoo on Integricloud
    Integricloud gave me access to their infrastructure to track some issues on ppc64 and ppc64le. Since some of the issues are related to the compilers, I obviously installed Gentoo on it and in the process I started to fix some issues with catalyst to get a working install media, but that’s for another blogpost. Today I’m just giving a walk-through on how to get a ppc64le (and ppc64 soon) VM up and running.
  • Industrial Mini-ITX board pumps up with Coffee Lake
    Commell’s “LV-67X” Mini-ITX board runs on 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors, with up to 32GB DDR4, 3x SATA, triple 4K displays, USB 3.1, and PCIe x16 and mini-PCIe expansion. The LV-67X, which shares some of the layout and feature set of its Intel Apollo Lake based LV-67U board, is the first industrial Mini-ITX board we’ve seen with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs. (Going forward, we’ll likely use the caffeinated nickname rather than “8th Gen” because Intel also applies the 8th Gen tag to the transitional and similarly 14nm Kaby Lake-G chips as well as the new, 10nm Cannon Lake processors.)
  • Unofficial OpenGApps for Android Pie 9.0 Released for ARM and ARM64 Platforms

Red Hat and Fedora News