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Server: Buzzwords ('Serverless' and 'Cloud'), Docker, CNCF, and Etcd

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  • The evolution of IT infrastructure – from mainframe to server-less

    The world of IT architecture has been on a long and complex journey over the last 60 years and the rate of change is showing no signs of slowing.

    This journey is commonly split into five stages, each one with its own specific technology drivers, underpinned by the exponential increase in processing power and decline in the cost of computer technology, more commonly known as Moore’s Law.

    That’s not to say each stage has resided in isolation. There has been plenty of crossover throughout the years, with some businesses - and indeed industries - being slower than others to move on from legacy technologies.

    While this wasn’t such an issue in the past, today’s rapid rate of innovation and unprecedented levels of competition mean businesses simply can’t afford to stand still.

  • Public cloud: 8 stats to see

    CIOs don't want to debate cloud adoption any more: They want to talk cloud optimization, as Jeff Budge, VP at OneNeck IT Solutions, recently noted. Analyst outlooks and research reports back this up, showing rapid growth for public cloud and hybrid cloud in the months and years ahead.

    As you explain cloud – and your own cloud decisions – to others in the organization, you'll want some data points for context. So we've highlighted a few studies that help tell the public and hybrid cloud story for 2018 and answer some relevant questions: Where does cloud land on a CIO's priorities list? Is it living up to its cost-savings promise? How much work is shifting to the public cloud? Dig in for more.

  • Founder Solomon Hykes Bids Docker
  • CNCF Expands Cloud Security Capabilities With SPIFFE, OPA Projects

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced on March 29 that it is adding the Open Policy Agent (OPA) and the Secure Production Identity Framework for Everyone (SPIFFE) projects to its hosted projects roster.

    OPA and SPIFFE extend the security capabilities available to cloud and container workloads, helping to fill perceived gaps in existing security controls. CNCF is home to the Kubernetes container orchestration platform, as well as a growing list of open-source projects that help to facilitate and secure cloud native computing.

  • Here’s Why You Should Secure Your Etcd Deployment

    Etcd, a key-value store and a core component of Kubernetes clusters, is used to store highly sensitive configuration data but is also easily left unprotected, as a developer recently found.

    Puerto Rican software developer Giovanni Collazo was looking into etcd, first developed by CoreOS, and realized that before version 2.1, released in July 2015, it didn’t support any type of authentication. Even after it was added, this feature was kept off by default for backward compatibility reasons.

    A similar approach was taken by MongoDB developers in the past and resulted in thousands of insecure deployments on the internet that were abused by hackers. So, Collazo set out to see if etcd’s design decisions had a similar effect.

    A quick search on Shodan, a search engine for devices and services, revealed 2,284 etcd servers that were directly accessible from the internet through their RESTful APIs.

Servers: Docker, Kubernetes and OpenStack

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  • Docker Founder Solomon Hykes Announces Exit from Docker Inc.

    In surprise move, Docker Inc. founder Solomon Hykes announced on March 28 that he is leaving the company he created.

    "After 10 years building Docker, now feels like the natural moment to move on," Hykes wrote in an email to eWEEK. "That's obviously not an easy decision, but I'm certain that it is the right one for everyone."

    The company that Hykes is now leaving is a very different one than the one he created back in November 2007, which was originally known as dotCloud. In March 2013, Hykes introduced the world to the open-source Docker project, re-inventing containers and ushering in a new age of cloud native applications.

  • Public cloud security: Follow the Goldilocks principle

    Security pervades just about every aspect of IT these days: data breaches, IoT devices, AI, containers, development pipelines and more. Ask me what’s at the top of the list of just about any IT leader’s challenges, and I’ll do my best Amazing Kreskin impression: “Security!” – and I’ll almost certainly be right.

  • Just say no to root (in containers)

    OpenShift is Red Hat's container platform, built on Kubernetes, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and OCI containers, and it has a great security feature: By default, no containers are allowed to run as root. An admin can override this, otherwise all user containers run without ever being root. This is particularly important in multi-tenant OpenShift Kubernetes clusters, where a single cluster may be serving multiple applications and multiple development teams. It is not always practical or even advisable for administrators to run separate clusters for each. Sadly one of the biggest complaints about OpenShift is that users can not easily run all of the community container images available at docker.io. This is because the vast majority of container images in the world today require root.

  • 12 Kubernetes distributions leading the container revolution

    Kubernetes has become the project to turn to if you need container orchestration at scale. The open source container orchestration system out of Google is well-regarded, well-supported, and evolving fast.

    Kubernetes is also sprawling, complex, and difficult to set up and configure. Not only that, but much of the heavy lifting is left to the end user. The best approach, therefore, isn’t to grab the bits and try to go it alone, but to seek out a complete container solution that includes Kubernetes as a supported, maintained component.

  • Kubernetes 1.10 Release Advances Storage and Improves Security

    The first major release of 2018 for the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration platform is now available, including a patch for a critical vulnerability that could have enabled an attacker to access the host filesystem.

  • Nexenta Achieves Certification for Red Hat OpenStack Platform Certification

    Nexenta Certification with Red Hat OpenStack Platform Helps to Enable Telcos and Enterprises to Fuel Expansion of Software Defined Hybrid and Multi Clouds

Server: Solomon Hykes Leaves, Veterans Do GNU/Linux, A Wee Server for the Home

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  • Solomon Hykes, Docker's founder, leaves day-to-day running of container company

    He wrote, "I'm announcing my departure from Docker, the company I helped create ten years ago and have been building ever since. A founder's departure is usually seen as a dramatic event. Sadly, I must report that reality is far less exciting in this case. I've had many roles at Docker over the years, and today I have a new, final one - as an active board member, a major shareholder and, I expect, a high maintenance Docker user. But I will no longer be part of day-to-day operations."

    This move comes almost a year after his co-founder, Ben Golub, stepped down as CEO. As for Hykes, he started moving away from Docker's executive team in November 2017. He went from being CTO to vice chairman of the board of directors and chief architect.

    Besides being a leader, Hykes has been the controversial face of Docker. In 2016, for example, he started a tempest in the container world by tweeting: "OCI (Open Container Initiative) image format is a fake standard." This open-source standard for container specification was supported by other container companies, such as CoreOS, and his own company.

  • Honor Courage Commitment, Linux Academy Partner for Veteran IT Training

    Sosamon worked seven jobs in the eight years following his departure from the military. Every time he embarked on a new career path, he couldn’t help feeling like something was missing.

    Now, as executive director of Honor Courage Commitment, he’s helping discharged veterans adapt to life as a civilian and find jobs in the area.

  • A wee server for the home

    On the surface, this presentation is about setting up a small, inexpensive, low-power server for the home. However, it uses that objective as an excuse to delve deeper into some technical issues, as well as to reflect upon the effect of free software on the relationship between computers and humans. It will answer the obvious questions about such a server: the whats, whys, hows, etc. It will share experiences with hardware and software for services such as shared file systems, backups, printing, Jabber/XMPP, music, and more. But it will also sneak in some deeper technical excursions enabled by free software, such as the preferred way, and reasons, to write random data prior to setting up encrypted storage. It will also include some personal observations on the experiential differences between using free and non-free software, especially those relating to enjoyment and to learning and teaching, formal and informal.

Databases: MySQL Popularity (and PostgreSQL Also), MySQL on OpenShift

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OSS
  • What a Difference a Decade Makes

    A decade ago today, the MySQL database was 12 years, 10 months and 4 days old. PostgreSQL, for its part, clocked in at 11 years, 8 months and 19 days old. Though not quite teenagers, both databases had a laundry list of accomplishments to point to: robust communities, massive distribution and even high profile success stories with various web players.

    At the 2005 Open Source Business Conference, even the self-selected audience of senior technology executives willing to attend an open source conference – which included representatives of Citistreet, Fidelity, JP Morgan Chase, Priceline and others – expressed their reservations about trusting open source for “mission critical” database workloads.

    The following three years didn’t, on the surface, appear to make much of an impact on enterprise attitudes towards open source. Within mainstream enterprises ten years ago, open source databases were generally regarded as a non-factor. With analysts characterizing their adoption as “superficial” and “limited to certain specific application workloads,” enterprises displayed little interest in the likes of MySQL and PostgreSQL, though admittedly the story below the senior executives’ radar looked very different. Open source databases might be good enough for Facebook or Google, but they weren’t enough to displace Oracle and other commercial suppliers for more conservative enterprise buyers.

  • Deploying a Spring Boot App with MySQL on OpenShift

    This article shows how to take an existing Spring Boot standalone project that uses MySQL and deploy it on Red Hat OpenShift, In the process, we’ll create docker images which can be deployed to most container/cloud platforms. I’ll discuss creating a Dockerfile, pushing the container image to an OpenShift registry, and finally creating running pods with the Spring Boot app deployed.

    To develop and test using OpenShift on my local machine, I used Red Hat Container Development Kit (CDK), which provides a single-node OpenShift cluster running in a Red Hat Enterprise Linux VM, based on minishift. You can run CDK on top of Windows, macOS, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux. For testing, I used Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation release 7.3. It should work on macOS too.

Red Hat on Kubernetes 1.10

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  • Getting acquainted with Kubernetes 1.10

    Kubernetes, a leading open source project for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications, announced version 1.10 today. Among the key features of this release are support for the Container Storage Interface (CSI), API aggregation, a new mechanism for supporting hardware devices, and more.

    It's also the first release since CoreOS joined Red Hat. CoreOS already had the opportunity to work closely with our new Red Hat colleagues through the Kubernetes community and we now have the opportunity to redouble our efforts to help forward Kubernetes as an open source and community-first project.

    The Kubernetes project gave a sneak peek at the feature list of Kubernetes 1.10 when the beta was released, but here we'll take a closer look at some of the more significant developments. First, however, it may be helpful to give a quick refresher on how Kubernetes is developed and new features are added to the system.

  • Kubernetes 1.10 is Here

    Kubernetes 1.10 has arrived, bringing a host of new features and fixes for deploying, scaling and managing containerized applications. This release is also the first to arrive since CoreOS joined the Red Hat family. The two teams have long worked closely along with the rest of the community on many aspects of Kubernetes, and now our combined efforts will further cement our commitment to this important project.

ZTE launches container networking solution for open source NFV

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OSS

ZTE has unveiled an end-to-end container networking solution for open-source NFV, which it hopes will promote the development of cloud native technology and the open source ecosystem. The vendor says operators need the ability to quickly adapt to changing network demands with low cost solutions while maintaining continuous innovation. As such, it believes that containers are the best carrier for NFV transformation.

ZTE says that container-based cloud native applications will become the trend for communications technology applications. However, the native Kubernetes network model used in the IT industry is too simple to meet telco service requirements.

Read more

A side-by-side comparison of MongoDB and Cassandra databases

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OSS

They're both databases, obviously. More importantly, they are both examples of NoSQL databases. NoSQL is a type of database architecture in which data is stored in a relatively unstructured fashion. Compared to more traditional SQL-style databases, NoSQL can be a more efficient way of storing the large quantities of unstructured data that organizations commonly use for big data operations.

MongoDB and Cassandra are also both open source -- although commercial implementations are available, too. But even in that respect, they are not identical. MongoDB is governed by GNU Affero General Public License 3.0, whereas Cassandra is subject to Apache License 2.0.

Read more

Server: Docker Turns 5, LFTP, Google Skaffold

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  • Docker Turns 5: A Look at How the Technology Popularized Containers [Ed: Slideshow by Sean Michael Kerner]
  • Enhanced

    LFTP is an alternative to the FTP command set, which supports many protocols and offers countless parameters.

    Although pretty much outdated, the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) still plays a significant role. For 20 years, LFTP has offered a greatly expanded command set for the command line that handles secure transmissions, without being excessively difficult to handle.

  • Google Skaffold Automates Kubernetes Orchestration

    Google is throwing an automation tool to developers looking to use Kubernetes to orchestrate enterprise applications. That assistance is coming from a command line tool dubbed Skaffold that can help continuous development for Kubernetes applications.

    Vic Iglesias, a solutions architect at Google, noted in a blog post that Skaffold allows developers to more closely mirror production methods within an enterprise. It does this by allowing developers to work on application source code in their local environment. That code can then be updated and ready for validation and testing in the developer’s local or remote Kubernetes clusters.

Server: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols on Docker and SMACK, Sean Michael Kerner on OpenPower

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  • What is Docker and why is it so darn popular?

    Five years ago, Solomon Hykes helped found a business, Docker, which sought to make containers easy to use. With the release of Docker 1.0 in June 2014, the buzz became a roar. And, over the years, it's only got louder.

    All the noise is happening because companies are adopting Docker at a remarkable rate. In July 2014 at OSCon, I ran into numerous businesses that had already moved their server applications from virtual machines (VM) to containers.

  • Understanding the SMACK stack for big data

    Just as the LAMP stack revolutionized servers and web hosting, the SMACK stack has made big data applications viable and easier to develop. Want to come up to speed? Here are the basics.

  • OpenPower Foundation Aims to Power Server Acceleration Beyond Moore's Law

    When IBM first created the OpenPower Foundation in 2013, there were vendors that thought they would get into the silicon business and build their own chips, but as it turns out, that's not quite what happened.

    At the OpenPower Summit 2018 event, Brad McCredie, IBM fellow and VP, outlined how OpenPower has progressed over the last five years and what members are actually building.

    [...]

    An offshoot of the OpenPower Foundation is OpenCAPI, which is an effort to build an Open Coherent Accelerator Processor Interface that is supported by AMD, Google, Mellanox and Micron among the group's founding members.

Server: GNU/Linux on OpenPOWER and ARM64

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  • Inspur Unveils Open Source Software Adapted Server at OpenPOWER Summit 2018

    Inspur, a member of the OpenPOWER Foundation, showcased its FP5280G2 server based on OpenPOWER9 that has completed the adaptation of mainstream open source software for cloud computing, big data and AI. It was the first time that this product was introduced in North America. As the initiator of the OpenPOWER Foundation, IBM disclosed more details of POWER9 processors: designed for emerging applications such as AI, cloud computing, and big data, and has 50% to 200% performance improvement compared to POWER8.

  • Updated Oracle Linux 7 update 4 ARM64/aarch64 with uek5 4.14.26-2

    We refreshed the installation media for OL7/ARM64 with the latest uek5 preview build based on upstream stable 4.14.26 and added perf and tuned.

    You can download it from the OTN OL ARM webpage. Ignore the 4.14-14 in the text, that will get updated. We're also working on updating the Raspberry Pi 3 image to match the same version. Hopefully using grub2 there as well to make it easier to have a single image repo.

  • Oracle Linux 7 For ARM64 Updated, Using Linux 4.14 Kernel

    Oracle has made available updated installation media for Oracle Linux 7 for ARM64.

    With Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 5 they are using the Linux 4.14 LTS base and that includes for this 64-bit ARM support too. Oracle has made available Oracle Linux 7 for 64-bit ARM with an "Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 5" based on the upstream Linux 4.14.26 kernel.

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today's leftovers

  • How to dual-boot Linux and Windows
    Even though Linux is a great operating system with widespread hardware and software support, the reality is that sometimes you have to use Windows, perhaps due to key apps that won't run under Linux. Thankfully, dual-booting Windows and Linux is very straightforward—and I'll show you how to set it up, with Windows 10 and Ubuntu 18.04, in this article. Before you get started, make sure you've backed up your computer. Although the dual-boot setup process is not very involved, accidents can still happen. So take the time to back up your important files in case chaos theory comes into play. In addition to backing up your files, consider taking an image backup of the disk as well, though that's not required and can be a more advanced process.
  • Weather Forecasting Gets A Big Lift In Japan
    This is a lot more compute capacity than JMA has had available to do generic weather forecasting as well as do predictions for typhoons, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions – the weather forecasting alone is predicted to run 10X faster, according to Cray.
  • Bitwarden Password Manager Adds Command Line Vault
    Bitwarden, the secure, open source password manager we talked about recently, added a command line tool to its list of apps you can use to access your passwords. Bitwarden CLI is currently in public beta testing, and according to its documentation, it includes all the features available in other Bitwarden client applications, like the desktop or browser extension.
  • GSoC’18 Week 1
    The first week of the coding period was great and I got to learn a lot of new things. My mentors help me on every stage and the work is going on as planne [...] Improvement in the overall UI is still in progress. Other than this, I have been working on refactoring the current code for this activity and breaking the whole code into various elements. For the next week, my main task is to complete the overall UI of this activity and add more geometries for drawing.
  • Time to Test Plasma 5.13 Beta
    The forthcoming new release of Plasma 5.13 will have some lovely new features such as rewritten System Settings pages and Plasma Browser Integration. But we need testers. Incase you missed it the Plasma 5.13 release announce has a rundown of the main features. If you are an auditory learner you can listen to the Late Night Linux Extra podcast where Jonathan “great communicator” Riddell talks about the recent sprint and the release.
  • GSoC students are already hacking!
    We always enjoy that new people join openSUSE community and help them in their first steps. Because of that, openSUSE participates again in GSoC, an international program in which stipends are awarded to students who hack on open source projects during the summer. We are really excited to announce that this year four students will learn about open source development while hacking on openSUSE projects. The coding period started last week, so our students are already busy hacking and they have written some nice articles about their projects. ;)
  • CryptoFest a openSUSE Conference již tento víkend v Praze
  • openSUSE Conference a CryptoFest 2018
  • Aaeon reveals two rugged, Linux-ready embedded PCs
    Aaeon unveiled two Linux-friendly embedded systems: an “AIOT-IP6801” gateway equipped with an Apollo Lake-based UP Squared SBC with WiFi and LoRa, and a “Boxer-8120AI” mini-PC with an Nvidia Jetson TX2 module and 4x GbE ports. Aaeon announced that three of its Linux-ready embedded systems have won Computex d&j awards, including two previously unannounced models: an Intel Apollo Lake based AIOT-IP6801 gateway based on Aaeon’s community-backed UP Squared board, as well as a Boxer-8120AI embedded computer built around an Arm-based Jetson TX2 module.
  • Last Call for Purism's Librem 5 Dev Kits, Git Protocol Version 2 Released, LXQt Version 0.13.0 Now Available and More
    Purism announces last call for its Librem 5 dev kits. If you're interested in the hardware that will be the platform for the Librem 5 privacy-focused phones, place your order by June 1, 2018. The dev kit is $399, and it includes "screen, touchscreen, development mainboard, cabling, power supply and various sensors (free worldwide shipping)".