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Containers and Servers

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  • Kubeflow Project Tacks Machine Learning on Top of Kubernetes

    The Kubernetes community is extending the reach of the container orchestration platform into the field of machine learning.

    Kubeflow is an open source project that supports machine learning stacks on Kubernetes. The project is housed within the Kubernetes project, which is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). CNCF is, of course, housed within the Linux Foundation.

  • Amazon Launches Amazon Linux 2

    This upgraded offering includes access to the latest 4.9 LTS kernel and was created for those who run enterprise or high-performance applications on Linux and, as such, was designed with performance, stability, and security in mind.

  • Kubernetes, standardization, and security dominated 2017 Linux container news

    The OCI, part of the Linux Foundation, launched in 2015 "for the express purpose of creating open industry standards around container formats and runtime." Currently there are two specs: Runtime and Image, and both specs released version 1.0 in 2017.

Kubeflow Brings Machine Learning to Kubernetes

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Kubernetes at its' core is a container orchestration system. But simply running containers for their own sake has little purpose, at the end of the day what really matters are applications.

Among the most interesting and often challenges types of application workloads are machine learning, which can often be difficult to deploy and operate. On Dec. 21 the Kubeflow project was officially announced by Google engineers as a new stack to easily deploy and run machine learning workloads.

"The Kubeflow project is dedicated to making Machine Learning on Kubernetes easy, portable and scalable," the Kubeflow GitHub project pagestates. "Our goal is not to recreate other services, but to provide a straightforward way for spinning up best of breed OSS solutions."

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Server: Kubernetes, Containers, Top 3 Linux Server Distros of 2018

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  • Open-Source Cloudify Delivers Multi-Stack Interoperability for Kubernetes & Robust Security, Bridging the Gap Between Application & Network Virtualization
  • The Commodity Container Story

    The focus maybe on AWS EKS, the managed Kubernetes offering. The future is with AWS Fargate and similar services

  • Keynote: Maximizing developer velocity with containers

    Containers are one of the most exciting technologies in the cloud right now. But when it comes to your IT strategy, where is the best place to start? With so many different options and configurations, it’s critical that you find the best possible strategy for your software stack.

    To answer these questions, Canonical’s VP of Product Development Dustin Kirkland and VMware Staff Engineer Sabari Murugesan presented at the SF Bay Area OpenStack User Group Meeting. You can watch the full talk here!

  • Top 3 Linux Server Distros of 2018

    While Linux might not be a consumer favorite product like Microsoft’s Windows is, Linux is the preferred operating system that administrators and tech savvy people choose. Linux is considered as the best platform by computer experts and that’s because Linux offers complete freedom alongside security and hardware support.

    The best thing about Linux is the fact that it supports a bunch of server distros. Unlike Microsoft’s Windows, Linux users get to choose from a plethora of server distros and pick the one which suits their needs the most. Nonetheless, today we are going to present the best Linux server operating systems.

Containerd 1.0 Release Becomes the Public Face of Containers

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There may be a plurality of operative components inside an OCI standard container, though for now, two are of prime importance. The runc component is the executive — the part which makes a container functional unto itself. The second part of the puzzle, containerd acts as the part that “supervises” the lifecycle of containers, and that communicates with the outside world via API calls.

That functionality may replace the need for the continual presence of a full container engine in a production system, clearing the way for Kubernetes, Mesosphere DC/OS, and other container orchestration engines.

Read more

Also: Why Red Hat is Bullish on Containers

7 Best Linux Server Distros You Need To Use | 2018 Edition

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Linux
Server

When it comes to the popularity of different operating systems, Linux enjoys a better position in the servers market. Due to many unbeatable benefits like stability, security, freedom, and hardware support, Linux is often the favorite platform to work upon for system administrators and expert users. Just like other special uses (including gaming, programming, or hacking), the category of Linux server distros too is vast.

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Also: Solus Devs Add Initial Snapd Support, Improvements to Linux Steam Integration

Containers and Kubernetes News

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  • Containers lecture

    Whilst trying to introduce containers, the approach I've taken is to work up the history of Web site/server/app hosting from physical hosting and via Virtual Machines. This gives you the context for their popularity, but I find VMs are not the best way to explain container technology. I prefer to go the other way and look at a process on a multi-user system, the problems due to lack of isolation and steadily build up the isolation available with tools like chroot, etc.

  • As Kubernetes surged in popularity in 2017, it created a vibrant ecosystem

    Kubernetes is actually an open source project, originally developed at Google, which is managed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Over the last year, we’ve seen some of the biggest names in tech flocking to the CNCF including AWS, Oracle, Microsoft and others, in large part because they want to have some influence over the development of Kubernetes.

  • Ops Checklist for Monitoring Kubernetes at Scale

    By design, the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is not self-monitoring, and a bare installation will typically only have a subset of the monitoring tooling that you will need. In a previous post, we covered the five tools for monitoring Kubernetes in production, at scale, as per recommendations from Kenzan.

  • Kubernetes 1.9 brings beta support for Windows apps

    Kubernetes, the cloud container orchestration program, expands even further and has grown more stable.

  • Kubernetes Linux Container Orchestration System Now Supports Windows Too

    Kubernetes, the open-source, production-grade container orchestration system for automating scaling, deployment, and management of containerized apps, has been updated to version 1.9.

    Coming two and a half months after version 1.8, Kubernetes 1.9 is here with a bunch of new features like the general availability of the Apps Workloads API (Application Programming Interface), which is enabled by default to provide long-running stateful and stateless workloads, as well as initial, beta support for Windows systems.

Linux Foundation: New Silver Members, OpenContrail, and Xen

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  • The Linux Foundation Announces 21 New Silver Members

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 21 Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

  • Juniper transfers OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation

    Juniper Networks is handing over the governance of the OpenContrail project to the Linux Foundation.

    OpenContrail is an open source network virtualization platform aimed at cloud environments and dealing mainly with the control plane - responsible for traffic routing. Juniper will continue developing and selling a commercial, fully supported version of the software, called simply Contrail.

  • The Linux Foundation Simplifies Xen Hypervisor Usage

    Cloud service providers tend to favor various implementations of the open source Xen hypervisor because it’s simply not cost effective for them to pay to license a commercial hypervisor at scale. It’s not clear to what degree enterprise IT organizations will want to follow suit. But The Linux Foundation that oversees development of Xen aims to increase the appeal of Xen by making available a more streamlined version that is simpler to use.

    George Dunlap, a Xen Project Contributor and a senior engineer at Citrix, says version 4.10 of the Xen Hypervisor Project includes a new user interface in addition to a trusted computing base (TCB) that has been made smaller and, by extension, more secure. The expectation is that a more compact implementation of Xen will not only consume fewer system resources, but also reduce the overall attack surface exposed, says Dunlap. Those attributes should make Xen a more attractive option, for example, in Internet of Things (IoT) projects where licensing a commercial hypervisor is likely to prove cost prohibitive, adds Dunlap.

  • The Xen Project Welcomes Bitdefender to its Advisory Board

    The Xen Project, a project hosted at The Linux Foundation, today announced Bitdefender, a leading global cybersecurity technology company protecting 500 million users worldwide, is a new Advisory Board member. The Xen Project Advisory Board consists of major cloud companies, virtualization providers, enterprises, and silicon vendors, among others, that advise and support the development of Xen Project software for cloud computing, embedded, IoT use-cases, automotive and security applications.

  • Xen Project Member Spotlight: Bitdefender

    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project, and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.

What Are Containers and Why Should You Care?

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What are containers? Do you need them? Why? In this article, we aim to answer some of these basic questions.

But, to answer these questions, we need more questions. When you start considering how containers might fit into your world, you need to ask: Where do you develop your application? Where do you test it and where is it deployed?

Read more

Desktop, Atari, and Servers: Kdenlive, MX-17, Linux Mint 18.3 and More

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  • Kdenlive Video Editor Issues Final Major Update on Old Codebase

    A new version of open-source video editor Kdenlive is available to download.

    Kdenlive 17.12.0 is something of a bittersweet release as it’s likely to be the final major release using the current Kdenlive codebase.

    Again, like the last few releases, this update is primarily focused on bug fixes and stability. In particular this update solves some niggling issues with proxy clips, with the team highlight ‘smoother seeking‘ and ‘reduced memory usage‘ as a result.

    Those of us you impatient for new features and major improvements will be pleased to hear that work on the next-generation Kdenlive is continuing apace. Kdenlive 18.04 is (as you might guess) tentatively scheduled for formal release in April of 2018.

  • The Best Linux Apps & Distros of 2017

    So join us (ideally with from a warm glass of something non-offensive and sweet) as we take a tart look backwards through some key releases from the past 12 months.

    This list is not presented in any sort of order, and all of the entries were sourced from YOUR feedback to the survey we shared earlier in the week. If your favourite release didn’t make the list, it’s because not enough people voted for it!

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  • MX-17 released December 15, 2017

    MX-17 final images are now available for download.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Boasts Updated Software Manager, Backup Tools
  • Ataribox Pre-Order Plan “Officially Paused”

    If you were hoping that today would be the day you’d get to throw $300 at your screen and snag a Linux-powered Ataribox games console …Well, we’ve some bad news.

    You may be aware that the Ataribox team said pre-orders for the Atari-branded games machine would go live today, December 14th.

  • Modernizing application delivery with container platforms

    Demands for faster production times, higher quality and more predictable cost management are posing significant challenges for development teams. In-house software development is essential in achieving these and other agency objectives. Exacerbating the demands on development teams is often the need to successfully release new applications, while also updating existing ones.

    From a technical aspect, at the center of the challenges for developers, is the need to reliably get software to run as it moves between computing environments. Containerization represents the best way for developers to accomplish this task, with containers driving operational efficiency and competitive advantages.

  • Building Open Source IoT Ecosystems
  • Invaluable tips and tricks for troubleshooting Linux

CoreOS and Kubernetes

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  • CoreOS’s Open Cloud Services Could Bring Cloud Portability to Container-Native Apps

    With the release of Tectonic 1.8, CoreOS provides a way to easily deploy container-native applications as services, even across multiple service providers and in-house resources.

    “We take open source APIs, make them super easy to consume, and create a catalog of these things to run on top of Kubernetes so they are portable no matter where you go,” said Brandon Philips, CoreOS chief technology officer.

  • Kubernetes 1.9 release brings greater stability and storage features

    The Kubernetes developer community is capping off a successful year with the release of Kubernetes 1.9, adding important new features that should help to further encourage enterprise adoption.

    Kubernetes is the most popular container orchestrator management software. It’s used to simplify the deployment and management of software containers, which are a popular tool among developers that allows them to run their applications across multiple computing environments without making any changes to the underlying code.

  • What’s new in Kubernetes containers

    Promoted to beta in Kubernetes 1.8 and now in production release in Kubernetes 1.9, the Apps Workloads API provides ways to define workloads based on their behaviors, such as long-running apps that need persistent state.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • State of Linux Containers
    In this video from the Stanford HPC Conference, Christian Kniep from Docker Inc. presents: State of Containers. “This talk will recap the history of and what constitutes Linux Containers, before laying out how the technology is employed by various engines and what problems these engines have to solve. Afterward, Christian will elaborate on why the advent of standards for images and runtimes moved the discussion from building and distributing containers to orchestrating containerized applications at scale. In conclusion, attendees will get an update on what problems still hinder the adoption of containers for distributed high performance workloads and how Docker is addressing these issues.”
  • ONS 2018: Networking Reimagined
    For the past seven years, Open Networking Summit (ONS) has brought together the networking industry’s ecosystem of network operators, vendors, open source projects, leading researchers, and investors to discuss the latest SDN and NFV developments that will shape the future of the networking industry. With this year’s event, taking place March 26-29, 2018 in Los Angeles, ONS will evolve its approach as the premier open source networking event. We’re excited to share three new aspects of this year’s ONS that you won’t want to miss:
  • AT&T contributes code to Linux open source edge computing project
    The Linux Foundation recently announced a new project, dubbed Akraino, to develop an open source software stack capable of supporting high-availability cloud services for edge computing systems and applications. To kick off the project, AT&T will contribute code made for carrier-scale edge computing applications running in virtual machines and containers.
  • AT&T Brings Akraino Networking Project to Edge of the Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation has been particularly busy in 2018 thus far consolidating its existing networking project under a single umbrella, known as LF Networking. That umbrella might need to get a bit larger, as on Feb. 20 the Linux Foundation announced the new Akraino project, with code coming initially from AT&T.
  • FreeOffice 2016 – An Efficient Alternative to Microsoft Office
    FreeOffice 2016 is the latest version of the Office software from SoftMaker. In fact, you wouldn’t be wrong if you called it the free version of SoftMaker Office 2018 seeing as it features the same suite of applications.
  • Stellaris 2.0 'Cherryh' patch & Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion released, over 1.5 million copies sold
    Stellaris: Apocalypse [Steam], the latest expansion for the grand space strategy game from Paradox Development Studio is out. The big 2.0 'Cherryh' patch is also now available. Paradox has also announced today, that Stellaris has officially passed 1.5 million copies sold making it one of their most popular games ever made. I'm not surprised by this, as I consider Stellaris their most accessible game.
  • Action-packed platformer with local and online co-op 'Vagante' has left Early Access
    After being in Early Access for quite some time, the action-packed platformer 'Vagante' [Steam, Official Site] has now officially left Early Access.
  • Gentoo has been accepted as a Google Summer of Code 2018 mentoring organization
  • Getting Debian booting on a Lenovo Yoga 720
    I recently got a new work laptop, a 13” Yoga 720. It proved difficult to install Debian on; pressing F12 would get a boot menu allowing me to select a USB stick I have EFI GRUB on, but after GRUB loaded the kernel and the initrd it would just sit there never outputting anything else that indicated the kernel was even starting. I found instructions about Ubuntu 17.10 which helped but weren’t the complete picture. What seems to be the situation is that the kernel won’t happily boot if “Legacy Support” is not enabled - enabling this (and still booting as EFI) results in a happier experience.
  • Dell PowerEdge T30
    I just did a Debian install on a Dell PowerEdge T30 for a client. The Dell web site is a bit broken at the moment, it didn’t list the price of that server or give useful specs when I was ordering it. I was under the impression that the server was limited to 8G of RAM, that’s unusually small but it wouldn’t be the first time a vendor crippled a low end model to drive sales of more expensive systems. It turned out that the T30 model I got has 4*DDR4 sockets with only one used for an 8G DIMM. It apparently can handle up to 64G of RAM.
  • Quad-Ethernet SBC and controller tap new Renesas RZ/N1D SoC
    Emtrion’s Linux-ready “SBC-RZN1D” SBC, which will soon power a “Flex2COM” controller, features a Renesas dual-core -A7 RZ/N1D SoC and 4x LAN ports, and is designed for multi-protocol fieldbus communications. Emtrion, which recently announced its emCON-RZ/G1H module based on an octa-core Renesas RZ/G1H SoC, has unveiled a Renesas based, quad-LAN port SBC-RZN1D SBC focused on industrial communication. The SBC-RZN1D taps the Renesas RZ/N1D (R9006G032), one of a new line of RZ/N1D SoCs launched last year by Renesas for industrial multi-protocol communications. Renesas recently collaborated with Avnet to ship its own dual-Ethernet Renesas RZ/N1D Solution Kit (see farther below).
  • Postage-Stamp Linux
    There was a time when big operating systems ran on big iron. IBM, Data General, Burroughs, DEC, and other computer makers built big machines with big, blinking lights, and big price tags. They ran grown-up software and they supported multiuser operating systems. If you wanted a toy, you built a microcomputer. If you wanted a real machine for serious work, you bought a mainframe. Maybe a minicomputer, if it were for lesser tasks.
  • Most Popular Android Versions In February 2018 (Always Updated List)
    Android is the most used operating system on the planet. In fact, it’s almost omnipresent in the mobile ecosystem. Even the Android versions, like Nougat, Marshmallow, Lollipop, etc. have been able to build their individual fan following.

Red Hat and Fedora: David Egts, Radcom, Google Summer of Code 2018, FOSS Wave

  • Red Hat’s David Egts: Microservices Tech Could Help Simplify App Deployment
    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat’s public sector, told MeriTalk in an interview published Wednesday that the microservices technology works to help the developer split complex, large applications into small components and share them with other members of the DevOps team.
  • Radcom partners with Red Hat for NFV management
    Radcom announced it is collaborating with Red Hat to provide operators with a fully virtualized network visibility solution running on Red Hat OpenStack Platform. As operators transition to NFV, a critical first step is gaining end-to-end network visibility. This collaboration enables operators to attain cloud-native network visibility without the hassle of building their own private cloud infrastructure, the vendor said. Once the operator's transition to NFV matures, integration efforts with the NFV and MANO infrastructure can be simplified.
  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Xerox Corporation (XRX)
  • Meeder Asset Management Inc. Has $1.75 Million Holdings in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Justin W. Flory: Humanitarian open source work: My internship at UNICEF
    In December, I received the happy news of an offer for a internship position at UNICEF in the Office of Innovation. The Office of Innovation drives rapid technological innovation by rapid prototyping of new ideas and building full-stack products to make a positive impact in the lives of children. This is a simple answer, but a more detailed description is on our website. My internship at UNICEF is unique: I support open source community engagement and research as my primary task for the MagicBox project. For years, I’ve done this in open source communities in my free time (namely SpigotMC and Fedora), but never in a professional role. As I navigate my way through this exciting opportunity, I plan to document some of the experience as I go through blogging. My intent is that my observations and notes will be useful to someone else in the humanitarian open source space (or maybe to a future me).
  • Fedora participating in Google Summer of Code 2018
    GSoC is a summer program aiming to bring more student developers into open source software development. It enables students to spend their summer break working with open source organizations on projects proposed by participating organizations and supported by mentors.
  • FOSS Wave with Fedora at KGISL, Coimbatore
    Recently, I was invited by Prem to NASSCOM to give a brief talk on FOSS and Technology as part of the FOSS Wave community. Prem is doing a great job there by putting his effort in helping students from Tier2 and Tier3 cities. Around twenty enthusiastic students were selected and invited to Bengaluru to take part in such events. Mine was one of them. I conducted a GitHub session after Intro to FOSS and a brief intro about Fedora Project.

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
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  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]