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A Comparison of Linux Container Images

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Going back to basics, there are two major parts of an operating system – the kernel and the user space. The kernel is a special program executed directly on the hardware or virtual machine – it controls access to resources and schedules process. The other major part is the user space – this is the set of files, including libraries, interpreters, and programs that you see when you log into a server and list the contents of a directory such as /usr or /lib.

Linux containers essentially break the two pieces of an operating system up even further allowing the two pieces to be managed independently – the container host and the container image. The container host is made up of an operating system kernel and a small user space that has a minimal set of libraries and daemons necessary to run containers. The container image is made up of the libraries, interpreters, and configuration files of an operating system user space, as well as the developer’s application code.

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Server: CephFS and Container News

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  • What you should know about CephFS

    Today, new storage system interfaces are created regularly to resolve emerging challenges in distributed storage. For example, Amazon Simple Storage Service [S3] (an opaque object store) and Amazon Elastic Block Storage [EBS] (a virtual machine image provider) both provide an essential, scalable storage service within a cloud ecosystem; however even with these new technologies, the conventional file system remains the most-widely used storage interface in computing.

    Virtually all programs are written to use a file system at some level. This makes the file system the lingua franca for all storage access on any computing device—from small devices such as smartphones, to large high-performance computing (HPC) clusters at CERN and national labs. Programs are still written to communicate and store data through file systems because of their convenience, familiarity, and interoperability.

  • Finding a digital transformation roadmap with containers

    But to make containers actually work, you need to use them in the right way. Creating a digital transformation roadmap with containers is not as simple as installing Docker and letting everything else fall into place on its own.

  • DH2i Adds Docker Support to App Portability Platform for Windows and Linux
  • DH2i Launches DxEnterprise v17 - Unified Smart Availability™ for Windows, Linux & Docker

Server: Serverless, Containers, and SysAdmin Careers

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  • This Week in Numbers: Serverless Adoption on Par with Containers

    Serverless technologies like functions as a service (FaaS) are in use by 43 percent of enterprises that both have a significant number of strategic workloads running in the public cloud workloads and the ability to dynamically manage them.

    Without those qualifications, it is easy to misinterpret the findings from New Relic’s survey-based ebook “Achieving Serverless Success with Dynamic Cloud and DevOps.” After digging in, we found that the survey says 70 percent of enterprises have migrated a significant number of workloads to the public cloud. Among this group, 39 percent of using serverless, 40 percent are using containers and 34 percent are using container orchestration.

  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Configuration and Automation

    System administrators looking to differentiate themselves from the pack are increasingly getting cloud computing certification or picking up skills with configuration management tools. From Puppet, to Chef to Ansible, powerful configuration management tools can arm sysadmins with new skills such as cloud provisioning, application monitoring and management, and countless types of automation.

    Configuration management platforms and tools have converged directly with the world of open source. In fact, several of the best tools are fully free and open source. From server orchestration to securely delivering high-availability applications, open source tools such as Chef and Puppet can bring organizations enormous efficiency boosts.

Docker Pivots to Proprietary

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Server: NASA, Kubernetes at GitHub, and Docker in Mainframes

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  • NASA Launches Supercomputer Servers into Space

    During that time, it will run a series of supercomputing benchmarks, including High Performance Linpack, the High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) suite, and the NASA-derived NAS parallel benchmarks. Its operation will be compared to HPE servers of the same construction back on Earth. The idea is to make sure that the ISS-based system is able to deal with the realities of cosmic radiation, solar flares, unstable electrical power, and wide variations in temperature.

  • Kubernetes at GitHub

    Over the last year, GitHub has gradually evolved the infrastructure that runs the Ruby on Rails application responsible for github.com and api.github.com. We reached a big milestone recently: all web and API requests are served by containers running in Kubernetes clusters deployed on our metal cloud. Moving a critical application to Kubernetes was a fun challenge, and we’re excited to share some of what we’ve learned with you today.

  • Docker Can Now Containerize Legacy Apps Running on Mainframes

    Docker this week announced the first update to its rebranded flagship platform with the release of Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) 17.06. Back in March, Docker rolled out the first Docker EE, built on the backs of what had been known as Docker Commercially Supported and Docker Datacenter.

    The new release comes on the heels of a report last week from Bloomberg that the container company has been raising money, which will result in $75 million dollars being added to its coffers by the end of the month, bringing with it a new valuation of $1.3 billion — up $300 million from its previous valuation.

CoreOS Tectonic 1.7

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  • CoreOS Tectonic 1.7 Improves Container Orchestration Platform

    Container management vendor CoreOS today released the latest update of its Tectonic platform, bringing the open-source Kubernetes based system to Microsoft's Azure cloud. The Tectonic 1.7 release is based on the upstream Kubernetes 1.7 project update that debuted at the end of June.

    Kubernetes started off as a Google open-source effort and became the cornerstone project of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. Kubernetes like other container technologies initially started off as a Linux-only platform but is now finding its way to Microsoft Azure thanks to the efforts of organizations like CoreOS. Microsoft's own Azure Container Service (ACS) added support for Kubernetes in February.

  • CoreOS extends Kubernetes to Microsoft Azure

Docker/Containers/Kubernetes

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Services/Servers/Containers News

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MongoDB Seeking IPO

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Server Leftovers

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  • Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career: Looking to the Cloud

    Sysadmins will always need core competencies such as networking and security, but increasingly, they can differentiate themselves by mastering new platforms and tools. Previously in this series, we've provided an overview of essentials, evolving network skills, and security. In this article, we'll look at how experience with open cloud computing platforms such as OpenStack can make a difference in your sysadmin career.

  • Top 5 container mistakes that cause security problems

    Given that many companies are still wrapping their arms around the potential of container technology and how to best leverage it, there is still a lot of experimentation with containers.

    Developers are working in their own sandboxes, setting them up on their laptops and then putting them into production. The issue, though, is that if containers are done without security measures in mind, you may not have the agility you want with the right controls.

    As a result, unknown content can end up in containers, even with today's growing marketing container tools. Kristen Newcomer, security strategist at RedHat, says before putting containers into production, you need to ask, "What’s the right process to manage this? How do I make sure things are controlled and managed as I would any other application?"

  • Time, Security Cited as Hurdles to Adoption of Containers

    Containers remain a nascent cloud platform choice for many enterprises. But lack of ecosystem maturity and familiarity are seen as early-stage hurdles toward adoption.

    Dustin Kirkland, VP of product at Canonical who’s on the company’s Ubuntu products and strategy team, said one of the biggest issues facing container adoption today is simply time. Containers are still relatively new in the eyes of enterprise customers who have only recently come to understand the benefits of virtual machines (VMs).

  • 4 container adoption patterns: What you need to know

    At this time of digital transformation, it’s crystal clear why today’s businesses desire speed. When a rival uses technology to make an unexpected move, or makes a big acquisition, you must react quickly. For example, the recent Amazon acquisition of Whole Foods demands fast action from supermarket competitors. To achieve that kind of business speed, IT leaders want to flip the 80/20 paradigm, where IT traditionally spent 80 percent of its budget on maintenance and 20 percent on innovation. CIOs seek to allocate more budget to help the business be agile and nimble.

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Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

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10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

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    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers. In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.
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Visual revamp of GNOME To Do

I’m a fan of productivity. It is not a coincidence that I’m the maintainer of Calendar and To Do. And even though I’m not a power user, I’m a heavy user of productivity applications. For some time now, I’m finding the overall experience of GNOME To Do clumsy and far from ideal. Recently, I received a thank you email from a fellow user, and I asked they what they think that could be improved. It was not a surprise when they said To Do’s interface is clumsy too. Read more

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