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Continuous Integration/Continuous Development with FOSS Tools

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Development
Server

One of the hottest topics within the DevOps space is Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD). This attention has drawn lots of investment dollars, and a vast array of proprietary Software As A Service (SaaS) tools have been created in the CI/CD space, which traditionally has been dominated by free open-source software (FOSS) tools. Is FOSS still the right choice with the low cost of many of these SaaS options?

It depends. In many cases, the cost of self-hosting these FOSS tools will be greater than the cost to use a non-FOSS SaaS option. However, even in today's cloud-centric and SaaS-saturated world, you may have good reasons to self-host FOSS. Whatever those reasons may be, just don't forget that "Free" isn't free when it comes to keeping a service running reliably 24/7/365. If you're looking at FOSS as a means to save money, make sure you account for those costs.

Even with those costs accounted for, FOSS still delivers a lot of value, especially to small and medium-sized organizations that are taking their first steps into DevOps and CI/CD. Starting with a commercialized FOSS product is a great middle ground. It gives a smooth growth path into the more advanced proprietary features, allowing you to pay for those only once you need them. Often called Open Core, this approach isn't universally loved, but when applied well, it has allowed for a lot of value to be created for everyone involved.

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Servers ('Cloud'), IBM, and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Is the cloud right for you?

    Corey Quinn opened his lightning talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x) with an apology. Corey is a cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, writes Last Week in AWS, and hosts the Screaming in the Cloud podcast. He's also a funny and engaging speaker. Enjoy this video "The cloud is a scam," to learn why he wants to apologize and how to find out if the cloud is right for you.

  • Google Cloud to offer VMware data-center tools natively

    Google this week said it would for the first time natively support VMware workloads in its Cloud service, giving customers more options for deploying enterprise applications.

    The hybrid cloud service called Google Cloud VMware Solution by CloudSimple will use VMware software-defined data center (SDCC) technologies including VMware vSphere, NSX and vSAN software deployed on a platform administered by CloudSimple for GCP.

  • Get started with reactive programming with creative Coderland tutorials

    The Reactica roller coaster is the latest addition to Coderland, our fictitious amusement park for developers. It illustrates the power of reactive computing, an important architecture for working with groups of microservices that use asynchronous data to work with each other.

    In this scenario, we need to build a web app to display the constantly updated wait time for the coaster.

  • Fedora Has Deferred Its Decision On Stopping Modular/Everything i686 Repositories

    The recent proposal to drop Fedora's Modular and Everything repositories for the upcoming Fedora 31 release is yet to be decided after it was deferred at this week's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting.

    The proposal is about ending the i686 Modular and Everything repositories beginning with the Fedora 31 cycle later this year. But this isn't about ending multi-lib support, so 32-bit packages will continue to work from Fedora x86_64 installations. But as is the trend now, if you are still running pure i686 (32-bit x86) Linux distributions, your days are numbered. Separately, Fedora is already looking to drop their i686 kernels moving forward and they are not the only Linux distribution pushing for the long overdue retirement of x86 32-bit operating system support.

Servers: Twitter Moves to Kubernetes, Red Hat/IBM News and Tips

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Red Hat
Server
  • Twitter Announced Switch from Mesos to Kubernetes

    On the 2nd of May at 7:00 PM (PST), Twitter held a technical release conference and meetup at its headquarters in San Francisco. At the conference, David McLaughlin, Product and Technical Head of Twitter Computing Platform, announced that Twitter's infrastructure would completely switch from Mesos to Kubernetes.

    For a bit of background history, Mesos was released in 2009, and Twitter was one of the early companies in support and use Mesos. As one of the most successful social media giants in the world, Twitter has received much attention due to its large production cluster scale (having tens of thousands of nodes). In 2010, Twitter started to develop the Aurora project based on the Mesos project to make it more convenient to manage both its online and offline business and gradually adopt to Mesos.

  • Linux Ending Support for the Floppy Drive, Unity 2019.2 Launches Today, Purism Unveils Final Librem 5 Smartphone Specs, First Kernel Security Update for Debian 10 "Buster" Is Out, and Twitter Is Switching from Mesos to Kubernetes

    Twitter is switching from Mesos to Kubernetes. Zhang Lei, Senior Technical Expert on Alibaba Cloud Container Platform and Co-maintainer of Kubernetes Project, writes "with the popularity of cloud computing and the rise of cloud-based containerized infrastructure projects like Kubernetes, this traditional Internet infrastructure starts to show its age—being a much less efficient solution compared with that of Kubernetes". See Zhang's post for some background history and more details on the move.

  • Three ways automation can help service providers digitally transform

    As telecommunication service providers (SPs) look to stave off competitive threats from over the top (OTT) providers, they are digitally transforming their operations to greatly enhance customer experience and relevance by automating their networks, applying security, and leveraging infrastructure management. According to EY’s "Digital transformation for 2020 and beyond" study, process automation can help smooth the path for SP IT teams to reach their goals, with 71 percent of respondents citing process automation as "most important to [their] organization’s long-term operational excellence."

    There are thousands of virtual and physical devices that comprise business, consumer, and mobile services in an SP’s environment, and automation can help facilitate and accelerate the delivery of those services.

    [...]

    Some SPs are turning to Ansible and other tools to embark on their automation journey. Red Hat Ansible Automation, including Red Hat Ansible Engine and Red Hat Ansible Tower, simplifies software-defined infrastructure deployment and management, operations, and business processes to help SPs more effectively deliver consumer, business, and mobile services.

    Red Hat Process Automation Manager (formerly Red Hat JBoss BPM Suite) combines business process management, business rules management, business resource optimization, and complex event processing technologies in a platform that also includes tools for creating user interfaces and decision services. 

  • Deploy your API from a Jenkins Pipeline

    In a previous article, 5 principles for deploying your API from a CI/CD pipeline, we discovered the main steps required to deploy your API from a CI/CD pipeline and this can prove to be a tremendous amount of work. Hopefully, the latest release of Red Hat Integration greatly improved this situation by adding new capabilities to the 3scale CLI. In 3scale toolbox: Deploy an API from the CLI, we discovered how the 3scale toolbox strives to automate the delivery of APIs. In this article, we will discuss how the 3scale toolbox can help you deploy your API from a Jenkins pipeline on Red Hat OpenShift/Kubernetes.

  • How to set up Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12: Process automation tooling

    The release of the latest Red Hat developer suite version 12 included a name change from Red Hat JBoss Developer Studio to Red Hat CodeReady Studio. The focus here is not on the Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, a cloud and container development experience, but on the locally installed developers studio. Given that, you might have questions about how to get started with the various Red Hat integration, data, and process automation product toolsets that are not installed out of the box.

    In this series of articles, we’ll show how to install each set of tools and explain the various products they support. We hope these tips will help you make informed decisions about the tooling you might want to use on your next development project.

Kubernetes News/Views

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Server
  • Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes – The Blending Continues [Ed: Cloud Foundry Foundation dominated by proprietary software firms]

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit in Philadephia, Troy Topnik of SUSE participated in the latest iteration of a panel discussing how the community continues to blend Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes. There is some interesting and insightful discussion between members of the panel from Google, IBM, Microsoft, Pivotal, SAP, and Swarna Podila of the Cloud Foundry Foundation.

    Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks form CF Summit on YouTube.

  • Don’t Throw Your Kubernetes Away

    The adoption of Kubernetes is growing at an unprecedented rate. Companies of all sizes are running it in production. Almost all of these companies were early adopters of Kubernetes where different dev teams brought Kubernetes inside the organization.

    Kubernetes is a very engineer-driven technology. Unlike instances like virtualization or other infrastructure components that are managed by the central IT team which offers them to different development groups, Kubernetes is something that developers bring into the organization.

  • Issue #2019.07.29 – Kubeflow Releases so far (0.5, 0.4, 0.3)

    Kubeflow 0.5 simplifies model development with enhanced UI and Fairing library – The 2019 Q1 release of Kubeflow goes broader and deeper with release 0.5. Give your Jupyter notebooks a boost with the redesigned notebook app. Get nerdy with the new kfctl command line tool. Power to the people – use your favourite python IDE and send your model to a Kubeflow cluster using the Fairing python library. More training tools added as well, with an example of XGBoost and Fairing.

Server: IBM, Amazon, Elastic, Cloudera and YugaByte

Filed under
Server
  • IBM CTO: ‘Open Tech Is Our Cloud Strategy’

    IBM may not be as splashy as some of the other tech giants that make big code contributions to open source. But as Chris Ferris, CTO for open technology at IBM says, “we’ve been involved in open source before open source was cool.”

    By Ferris’ estimation, IBM ranks among the top three contributors in terms of code commits to open source project and contributors to the various open source communities. “It’s really significant,” he said. “We don’t run around with the vanity metrics the way some others do, but it’s really important to us.”

  • TurboSched Is A New Linux Scheduler Focused On Maximizing Turbo Frequency Usage

    TurboSched is a new Linux kernel scheduler that's been in development by IBM for maximizing use of turbo frequencies for the longest possible periods of time. Rather than this scheduler trying to balance the load across all available CPU cores, it tries to keep the priority tasks on a select group of cores while aiming to keep the other cores idle in order to allow for the power allowance to be used by those few turbo-capable cores with the high priority work.

    TurboSched aims to keep low utilization tasks to already active cores as opposed to waking up new cores from their idle/power-savings states. This is beneficial for allowing the CPU cores most likely to be kept in their turbo state for longer while saving power in terms of not waking up extra cores for brief periods of time when handling various background/jitter tasks.

  • AWS Turbocharges new Linux Kernel Releases in its Extras Catalogue

    Amazon says it has added AWS-optimised variants of new Linux Kernel releases to its extras catalogue in Amazon Linux 2 – a Linux server operating system (OS) – saying the boost results in higher bandwidth with lower latency on smaller instance types.

    Amazon Linux is an OS distribution supported and updated by AWS and made available for use with Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances. Amazon Linux users will now be able to update the operating system to Linux Kernel 4.19, as released in October 2018.

  • Elastic Cloud Enterprise 2.3 turns admins into bouncers

    Version 2.3 of Elastic Cloud Enterprise (ECE) is now available for download, finally bringing role-based access control (RBAC) to its general user base and letting admins decide who gets to see what. ECE allows the deployment of Elastic’s search-based software as a service offerings on a company’s infrastructure of choice (public cloud, private cloud, virtual machines, bare metal).

    The new version is the first to come with four pre-configured roles to help admins control deployment access and management privileges. This is only the first step in the product’s RBAC journey, though. Customisable deployment-level permissions and greater abilities to separate users by teams are on the ECE roadmap.

  • Cloudera open source route seeks to keep big data alive

    Cloudera has had a busy 2019. The vendor started off the year by merging with its primary rival Hortonworks to create a new Hadoop big data juggernaut. However, in the ensuing months, the newly merged company has faced challenges as revenue has come under pressure and the Hadoop market overall has shown signs of weakness.

    Against that backdrop, Cloudera said July 10 that it would be changing its licensing model, taking a fully open source approach. The Cloudera open source route is a new strategy for the vendor. In the past, Cloudera had supported and contributed to open source projects as part of the larger Hadoop ecosystem but had kept its high-end product portfolio under commercial licenses.

    The new open source approach is an attempt to emulate the success that enterprise Linux vendor Red Hat has achieved with its open source model. Red Hat was acquired by IBM for $34 billion in a deal that closed in July. In the Red Hat model, the code is all free and organizations pay a subscription fee for support services.

  • YugaByte goes 100% open under Apache

    Open source distributed SQL database company YugaByte has confirmed that its eponymously named YugaByte DB is now 100 percent open source under the Apache 2.0 license.

    The additional homage to open source-ness means that previously commercial features now move into the open source core.

    YugaByte says it hopes that this will directly create more opportunities for open collaboration between users, who will have their hands on 100% open tools.

Cautionary Tales About Hosting With Microsoft

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Server
Microsoft
  • GitHub confirms it has blocked developers in Iran, Syria and Crimea [Ed: Microsoft wants us to believe that all companies need to do what GitHub did. That’s a lie. But Microsoft knows that it needs to lick Trump’s and Bolton’s boots to keep getting those government contracts that ‘bail it out’. Microsoft made its choice [1, 2].]

    The impact of U.S. trade restrictions is trickling down to the developer community. GitHub, the world’s largest host of source code, is preventing users in Iran, Syria, Crimea and potentially other sanctioned nations from accessing portions of the service, chief executive of the Microsoft-owned firm said.

  • Migrating an Exchange Server to the Cloud? What could possibly go wrong?

    As users stared at useless login screens, Ben and his team floundered for a few hours, trying to work out how to restore access.

    The clue was in the word "restore" as one bright spark remembered there was a user account named "backup" used, well, to do backups.

    It had been missed in the Exchange account purge and so was still active.

    And the Linux connection? The Microsoft Certified Partner used a server running the open-source operating system to perform backup duties.

    The backup software used that Active Directory account, which just so happened to have enough privileges to re-enable the Windows users via Linux LDAP tools.

    After all, these days Microsoft just loves open source, right?

Red Hat and IBM

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • 16 essentials for sysadmin superheroes

    You know you're a sysadmin if you are either knee-deep in system logs, constantly handling user errors, or carving out time to document it all along the way. Yesterday was Sysadmin Appreciation Day and we want to give a big "thank you" to our favorite IT pros. We've pulled together the ultimate list of tasks, resources, tools, commands, and guides to help you become a sysadmin superhero.

  • Kubernetes by the numbers: 13 compelling stats

    Fast-forward to the dog days of summer 2019 and a fresh look at various stats in and around the Kubernetes ecosystem, and the story’s sequel plays out a lot like the original: Kubernetes is even more popular. It’s tough to find a buzzier platform in the IT world these days. Yet Kubernetes is still quite young; it just celebrated its fifth “birthday,” and version 1.0 of the open source project was released just over four years ago. So there’s plenty of room for additional growth.

  • Vendors not contributing to open source will fall behind says John Allessio, SVP & GM, Red Hat Global Services
  • IBM open-sources AI algorithms to help advance cancer research

    IBM Corp. has open-sourced three artificial intelligence projects focused on cancer research.

  • IBM Just Made its Cancer-Fighting AI Projects Open-Source

    IBM just announced that it was making three of its artificial intelligence projects designed to help doctors and cancer researchers open-source.

  • IBM Makes Its Cancer-Fighting AI Projects Open Source

    IBM launches three new AI projects to help researchers and medical experts study cancer and find better treatment to the said disease in the future.

  • New Open-Source AI Machine Learning Tools to Fight Cancer

    In Basel, Switzerland at this week’s 18th European Conference on Computational Biology (ECCB) and 27th Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB), IBM will share three novel artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning tools called PaccMann, INtERAcT, and PIMKL, that are designed to assist cancer researchers.

    [...]

    “There have been a plethora of works focused on prediction of drug sensitivity in cancer cells, however, the majority of them have focused on the analysis of unimodal datasets such as genomic or transcriptomic profiles of cancer cells,” wrote the IBM researchers in their study. “To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any multi-modal deep learning solutions for anticancer drug sensitivity prediction that combine a molecular structure of compounds, the genetic profile of cells and prior knowledge of protein interactions.”

  • IBM offering cancer researchers 3 open-source AI tools

    Researchers and data scientists at IBM have developed three novel algorithms aimed at uncovering the underlying biological processes that cause tumors to form and grow.

    And the computing behemoth is making all three tools freely available to clinical researchers and AI developers.

    The offerings are summarized in a blog post written by life sciences researcher Matteo Manica and data scientist Joris Cadow, both of whom work at an IBM research lab in Switzerland.

  • Red Hat CTO says no change to OpenShift, conference swag plans after IBM buy

    Red Hat’s CTO took to Reddit this week to reassure fans that the company would stick to its open source knitting after the firm absorbed by IBM earlier this month AND that their Red Hat swag could be worth a packet in future .

    The first question to hit in Chris Wright’s Reddit AMA regarded the effect on Red Hat’s OpenShift strategy. The short answer, was “no effect”.

    “First, Red Hat is still Red Hat, and we are focused on delivering the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform,” Wright answered “Second, upstream first development in Kubernetes and community ecosystem development in OKD are part of our product development process. Neither of those change. The IBM acquisition can help accelerate the adoption of OpenShift given the increase scale and reach in sales and services that IBM has.”

Server: So-called 'DevOps' (Buzzword) and SysAdmin Day

Filed under
Server
  • Q&A: CircleCI CTO Explains Why DevOps Is a Growing Enterprise

    The CTO of DevOps platform vendor CircleCI shares insights on how the market has changed as his company raises new funds to power ahead.

  • Have you thanked a sysadmin today?

    Sysadmins are the heartbeat of many open source projects around the world. What would we do without them?

    So, once a year—or more if you're working on a team with a great outlook on life and positive culture—we take time out of our busy lives to say thank you.

  • Happy SysAdmin Day!

    The Purism team enjoys celebrating across all time zones. So far this year we’ve posted in celebration of Women’s Day, Pi Day and Towel Day–and today we’re celebrating System Administrator Appreciation Day!

    Because behind every network, big or small, system administrators are working hard to make sure that servers are secure, updates are painless and metaphorical fires are quickly put out. They frequently go beyond their job description to provide additional support to individual users on the network.

    One big, well-kept secret is that most of the Internet runs on free software. The other big secret is that all of the Internet runs on SysAdmins.

    So today we’d like to thank our SysOps team for their tireless work, juggling the demands of company resources, our shop and various websites, as well as our Librem One services. Your laptop, services –and soon your phone–will make their way to you in large part thanks to the infrastructure they maintain.

IBM and Servers

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Controlling Red Hat OpenShift from an OpenShift pod

    This article explains how to configure a Python application running within an OpenShift pod to communicate with the Red Hat OpenShift cluster via openshift-restclient-python, the OpenShift Python client.

  • 24 sysadmin job interview questions you should know

    As a geek who always played with computers, a career after my masters in IT was a natural choice. So, I decided the sysadmin path was the right one. In the process of my career, I have grown quite familiar with the job interview process. Here is a look at what to expect, the general career path, and a set of common questions and my answers to them.

  • How to transition into a career as a DevOps engineer

    DevOps engineering is a hot career with many rewards. Whether you're looking for your first job after graduating or seeking an opportunity to reskill while leveraging your prior industry experience, this guide should help you take the right steps to become a DevOps engineer.

    [...]

    If you have prior experience working in technology, such as a software developer, systems engineer, systems administrator, network operations engineer, or database administrator, you already have broad insights and useful experience for your future role as a DevOps engineer. If you're just starting your career after finishing your degree in computer science or any other STEM field, you have some of the basic stepping-stones you'll need in this transition.

  • Getting Started with Knative on Ubuntu

    Serverless computing is a style of computing that simplifies software development by separating code development from code packaging and deployment. You can think of serverless computing as synonymous with function as a service (FaaS). 

    Serverless has at least three parts, and consequently can mean something different depending on your persona and which part you look at – the infrastructure used to run your code, the framework and tools (middleware) that hide the infrastructure, and your code which might be coupled with the middleware. In practice, serverless computing can provide a quicker, easier path to building microservices. It will handle the complex scaling, monitoring, and availability aspects of cloud native computing.

Servers: cloud-init 19.2 Released and Red Hat on 'Cloud' and OpenStack with Kuryr

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Server
  • cloud-init 19.2 Released

    Version 19.1 is already available in Ubuntu Eoan. A stable release updates (SRU) to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial) will start in the next week.

  • Considering Cloud Repatriation? Don’t Forget Your Data!

    Organizations should consider complementing their object storage initiatives with an abstraction layer that combines storage from multiple clouds into a single virtual storage unit. Enterprises shouldn’t migrate data unless absolutely necessary. An abstraction layer can make it easier to manage data wherever it resides.

    The end result of all of this is an IT strategy that eliminates or reduces discontinuity between different cloud platforms. Enterprises can choose to use the public cloud based on their unique business needs, not their technical bandwidth. Or, they can opt to use a combination of public and private clouds. Either way, with the appropriate storage infrastructure, they can get rid of the remorse and rest assured that their data will always be available.

  • Accelerate your OpenShift Network Performance on OpenStack with Kuryr

    Overall, Kuryr provides a significant boost in pod-to-pod network performance. As an example we went from getting 0.5Gbps pod-to-pod to 5 Gbps on a 25 Gigabit link for the common case of 1024B TCP packets when worker nodes nodes were spread across separate OpenStack hypervisors. With Kuryr, we are able to achieve a higher throughput, satisfying application needs for better bandwidth while at the same time achieving better utilization on our high bandwidth NICs.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Java, Python, and Perl

  • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

    Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle. The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former. Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”. [...] Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.” Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

  • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

    Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

  • What's In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

    In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with. However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity. What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

  • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

    Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

    Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

  • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

    You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

    When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

    In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

    Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.

Server: Ubuntu 19.10 Release Schedule, IBM LinuxONE III with Ubuntu and SUSE on Cloud Foundry Foundation and More LF

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Release Schedule and Expected Features

    This is a continually updated article to inform you about Ubuntu 19.10 release date, features and other important things associated with it. The development for Ubuntu 19.10 is nearing its end and it’s time to look at what new features and improvement this new release brings. Ubuntu 19.10 is an important release because it will set the course of development for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (long term support). I have always felt that the LTS version release takes a lot of features from its predecessor. In other words, Ubuntu 19.10 will be a glimpse of the features you would be getting in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Announcing the new IBM LinuxONE III with Ubuntu

    Enterprises today need the most secure, and flexible system to support their initiatives, and for that system to grow and evolve for tomorrow. The latest LinuxONE system was designed to support mission-critical initiatives and allow enterprises to be innovative as they design and scale their environment. LinuxONE III provides features for advanced data protection and privacy, enterprise resiliency and scalability, and cloud enablement and integration. Reliability and continuity are critical to the success of any business. With this release, they’ll benefit from up to 10:1 consolidation for key workloads, and up to 190 cores and 40TB of memory. And with 99.999%* availability and up to 7.4x better resilience, enterprises can confidently run and scale their business-critical workloads. The new LinuxONE III provides the highest levels of availability and scalability, so business-critical workloads run flawlessly, recover quickly, and grow seamlessly.

  • Project Quarks: Native Cloud Foundry for Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov of SUSE gave a keynote demo of Project Quarks, the project that integrates Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes, by packaging the Cloud Foundry Application Runtime as containers instead of virtual machines. Vlad explains the current capabilities of Quarks, with a look at its future as a Kubernetes Operator. It’s a fairly technical topic, but Vlad uses creative diagrams and an understandable demo to show the power of Quarks. Cloud Foundry Foundation has posted all recorded talks from CF Summit EU on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what is happening in the Cloud Foundry world! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days. Watch Vlad’s talk below...

  • Broad Deployment Of Cloud Foundry Almost Double In Just 2 Years

    As businesses embark on their digital transformation journey, developers are driving innovation across cloud native environments for building into the future. According to a recently released report by Cloud Foundry Foundation, 45 percent of user respondents describe their Cloud Foundry use as “broad” compared to 30 percent in 2018 and 24 percent in 2017. The report also revealed that 39 percent of developers are deploying applications in less than one day. What points out towards a healthy and growing community of developers is the fact that almost one in five respondents started using Cloud Foundry in just the last 12 months.

  • The Linux Foundation to Host Open Source Project for Drone Aviation Interoperability

    The Linux Foundation today announced it will host the InterUSS Platform Open Source Project to enable trusted, secure and scalable interoperability between UAS Service Suppliers (USSs) that advances safe, equitable and efficient drone operations. Initial contributors include both industry and regulatory organizations Wing, AirMap, Uber and the Swiss Federal Office of Civil Aviation (FOCA). Similar to the evolution of cities, our skies are becoming busier with traffic. In an effort to unleash innovation and ensure safety, aviation regulators around the world are implementing UAS Traffic Management (UTM, also referred to as U-Space) to support rapidly increasing and highly diverse drone operations. Under UTM, a set of USSs (also known as U-Space Service Providers orUSPs) assist drone operators to conduct safe and compliant operations. USSs can provide service in overlapping airspace and share data when required to support services such as a strategic deconfliction of flight plans and remote identification and industry is developing standards for this data sharing through organizations such as ASTM International. The InterUSS Project provides a forum for collaboration and development of standards-compliant, open source implementations that facilitate communication in the UTM/U-Space environment.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox and kernel), Debian (thunderbird), Fedora (curl), openSUSE (curl and python-Werkzeug), Oracle (kernel and thunderbird), Red Hat (rh-nginx114-nginx), SUSE (curl, ibus, MozillaFirefox, firefox-glib2, firefox-gtk3, openldap2, openssl, openssl1, python-urllib3, and util-linux and shadow), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and wpa).

  • SGX and security modules

    Software Guard Extensions (SGX) is a set of security-related instructions for Intel processors; it allows the creation of private regions of memory, called "enclaves". The aim of this feature is to work like an inverted sandbox: instead of protecting the system from malicious code, it protects an application from a compromised kernel hypervisor, or other application. Linux support for SGX has existed out-of-tree for years, and the effort of upstreaming it has reached an impressive version 22 of the patch set. During the upstreaming discussion, the kernel developers discovered that the proposed SGX API did not play nicely with existing security mechanisms, including Linux security modules (LSMs).

  • GitHub acquires Semmle to help developers spot security vulnerabilities [Ed: Company in NSA PRISM pretends to care about security (and also, Microsoft now uses GitHub to change people's code without asking the developers)]

    Software hosting service GitHub has acquired Semmle, a code analysis platform that helps developers discover security vulnerabilities in large codebases.

today's howtos