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Self-Hosted and Open-Source Alternatives to Popular Services

Filed under
Server
OSS

The internet is a prominent place. And while it may feel like a few huge names like Netflix, Dropbox, and Facebook run the show, they are far from the only option you have available. It’s now easier than ever to find a self-hosted alternative to just about any online platform.

What does self-hosted mean? Self-hosted platforms are apps that function through their web hosting instead of a major option like Amazon Web Services. Generally, they’re not only open-source (a.k.a. free) but full of different content, features, and other things worth checking out.

And here’s the best part—they’re often cheaper! Here are some of the best self-hosted alternatives to popular services.

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Also: Ideal Linux webhosting services of 2020

Server and CMS: Kubernetes, openSUSE MicroOS, TiddlyWiki and WordPress

Filed under
Server
Misc

  • Music and math: the Kubernetes 1.17 release interview

    Every time the Kubernetes release train stops at the station, we like to ask the release lead to take a moment to reflect on their experience. That takes the form of an interview on the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google that I co-host with Craig Box. If you're not familiar with the show, every week we summarise the new in the Cloud Native ecosystem, and have an insightful discussion with an interesting guest from the broader Kubernetes community.

    At the time of the 1.17 release in December, we talked to release team lead Guinevere Saenger. We have shared the transcripts of previous interviews on the Kubernetes blog, and we're very happy to share another today.

    Next week we will bring you up to date with the story of Kubernetes 1.18, as we gear up for the release of 1.19 next month. Subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts to make sure you don't miss that chat!

  • New default: tmpfs on /tmp

    We made an important change for our Container Host OS openSUSE MicroOS, which our Kubernetes platform openSUSE Kubic will inherit since it is based on openSUSE MiceroOS: we use now tmpfs for /tmp.

    tmpfs is a temporary filesystem that resides in memory. Mounting directories as tmpfs can be an effective way of speeding up accesses to their files and to ensure that their contents are automatically cleared upon reboot.

    A fresh installation will use tmpfs for /tmp by default. Old installations needs to be converted to this manually, but it is still possible to switch back to use disk space for /tmp. This is especially useful and important, if big files are stored in /tmp.

  • TiddlyWiki, 12 Use-cases and 5 Tips for New Users.

    I have been using TiddlyWiki for years, mainly as personal memo, to-do organizer and encrypted data reserve (to keep track about some of my patients, or while learning). I always recommend this amazing project to my friends, colleagues doctors and developers alike, because I believe the value it gives is far so great than its minimal size and humble look.

    As a self-learner, TiddlyWiki was my main choice and companion to record what I learn, links I collect, code snippets, medical cases and algorithms. It's the only tool I am still using for more than decade.

    I consider a TiddlyWiki is a masterpiece, not in coding but its simplicity and flexibility, needless to say its rich features list.

  • WordPress 5.5 Beta 4

    WordPress 5.5 Beta 4 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so it’s not recommended to run this version on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

    [...]

    WordPress 5.5 is slated for release on August 11th, 2020, and we need your help to get there!

    Thank you to all of the contributors who tested the beta 3 development release and gave feedback. Testing for bugs is a critical part of polishing every release and a great way to contribute to WordPress.

The 6 Best Open Source Web Servers

Filed under
Server
OSS

Apache HTTP Server, colloquially known as Apache or httpd in Red Hat distributions is a free and opensource web server developed by Apache Software Foundation under Apache License version 2. Released in 1995, Apache has grown in leaps and bounds to become one of the most popular and widely used web servers, powering over 37% of all the websites.

Apache is written in C language and is a highly customizable webserver thanks to its tons of modules that extend the web server’s functionality. These include mod_file_cache for caching, mod_ftp to provide FTP support for file uploads and downloads, and mod_ssl that allows support for SSL / TLS encryption protocols, and many more.

Additionally, given its rich set of modules, Apache provides multi-protocol support such as both IPv4 and IPv6 support and the commonly used HTTP, HTTP/2, and HTTPS protocols.

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aaPanel – An Open Source Alternative For cPanel

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Server
OSS

cPanel is the control panel for web hosting built by cPanel LTD. In the last article of the Linux cPanel series, I reviewed Virtualmin, a popular, free, and open-source control panel. aaPanel is also a free and open-source control panel for Linux. It’s easy to install & all the web hosting options are well-categorized for easily managing websites and databases.

cPanel is a very popular control panel for web hosting. Most web hosting companies including Hostgator, Bluehost, and GoDaddy provide cPanel to easily perform tasks on servers. But, it is not free.

In this series, I am hunting down the best open source control panels for web hosting. aaPanel is one of such hosting panels that provides an easy to use GUI interface with a great number of options and security features.

First of all, aaPanel is easily installable. It provides a single script to be run on a newly created server. The script installs all the tools, dependencies, and sets up a user account to log in.

It is highly recommended that you run the script on a fresh system. Still, if you want to run it on a server that already has a few user-installed programs running, use the –force option when executing the script. Anyway, enough talk. Let’s do some practical.

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CNCF (Linux Foundation) and 10 Years of OpenStack

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Server
  • Linux Foundation Partners With CNCF on Kubernetes Certs, Training

    The Linux Foundation and Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) announced today they are collaboratively developing a Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS) certification expected to be available in November.

    At the same time, the two open source consortiums announced the availability of a training course dubbed “LFS244 – Managing Kubernetes Applications with Helm.” The CNCF is an arm of The Linux Foundation.

    Clyde Seepersad, senior vice president and general manager for training and certification at The Linux Foundation, says the Certified Kubernetes Security Specialist (CKS) certification will require IT professionals to be certified in Kubernetes management fundamentals as a prerequisite. The goal is to expand the amount of cybersecurity expertise IT professionals can bring to bear while also managing Kubernetes clusters, he says.

    The exam for the certification covers cluster setup, cluster hardening, system hardening, microservice vulnerabilities minimization, supply chain security, monitoring, logging and runtime security.

  • 10 Years of OpenStack
  • New Training Course Teaches Kubernetes Application Management with Helm

The Supercomputing Monoculture

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Hardware

But that very competition led to fragmentation. Alpha, MIPS, SPARC, and all the others each sold to a small niche of users. Meanwhile, Intel was selling x86 processors by the truckload to every PC maker on the planet while backing up forklifts full of cash into its bank vaults. The x86 franchise was an obscenely lucrative cash cow, even if some engineers ridiculed it as outmoded technology. Intel sold more processors than all the other vendors put together. And CPU development is expensive. Very expensive. One by one, the boutique CPU makers (Sun, Digital, Silicon Graphics, Intergraph, et al.) gave up on their in-house designs and started buying commercial processors, often from Intel. And, one by one, those companies failed anyway. PCs running Windows on x86 were ubiquitous and cheap. Artisanal Unix workstations running proprietary RISC processors were expensive – and not much faster than a PC anyway. The full-custom route just didn’t add up.

The huge uptake in x86-based supercomputers starting around 2005 wasn’t because Intel chips got a lot faster (although they did). It’s because most of the other competitors defaulted. They left an empty field for Intel to dominate. If the brains behind Alpha (to pick just one example) had had Intel levels of R&D money to work with, they probably would have stayed near the top of the performance heap for as long as they cared to. But that’s not reality or how the game is played. If my grandmother had wheels she’d be a wagon.

Now the same story is playing out again, but in ARM’s favor. ARM has the volume lead, beating even Intel by orders of magnitude in terms of unit volume. And, although ARM collects only a small royalty on each processor, not the entire purchase price, it also doesn’t have the crushing overhead costs that a manufacturer like Intel carries. ARM’s volume encourages a third-party software market to flourish, and that fuels a virtuous feedback loop that makes ARM’s architecture even more popular. There’s nothing inherently fast about ARM’s architecture – it definitely wasn’t designed for supercomputers – but there’s nothing wrong with it, either. If the x86 can hold the world’s performance lead, any CPU can. All it takes is time and volume.

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CentOS Vs. Ubuntu Server : Everything You Need to Know

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Ubuntu

Choosing the perfect Linux distribution to set up your server can be confusing since Linux provides a limitless number of options. The main reason behind these many distributions is because Linux is an opensource platform. Anybody with the required skills can contribute to the development or build and release their distribution. Currently, there are more than 600 Linux Desktop and Server distributions in the market.

Despite these many distributions, there are two principal Linux server distributions dominant in the market – CentOS and Ubuntu Server. Both are excellent choices for a server, and they both have their advantages over the other.

In this CentOS vs. Ubuntu comparison, we will look at the key features of both operating systems to guide you in choosing the right distributions for your Virtual Private Server.

Before shedding light on these two well-matched opponents’ features and services, let’s have a brief look at each of them.

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Servers: Kubernetes, MicroK8s and Ubuntu

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu
  • What’s up with the Kubernetes ecosystem

    This week’s acquisition of Rancher Labs by the veteran enterprise Linux firm SUSE neatly illustrates the growing momentum of container-based application deployment. It also underlines the importance of Kubernetes as the orchestration tool of choice for managing all those containers.

    So, what does this latest move mean for the broader Kubernetes ecosystem? When containers first garnered corporate attention six or seven years ago, Docker and its tools were the centre of attention. But the focus soon shifted to management frameworks capable of automating the deployment and scaling of containers, and Kubernetes, developed by Google from technology used in its cloud platform, quickly won out.

    Like many open source tools, Kubernetes has its share of rough edges and does not necessarily provide all the capabilities that users need to build a functioning container-based infrastructure. Companies such as Rancher sprang forth to provide a complete software stack built around Kubernetes for those who didn’t want to build it all themselves.

  • MicroK8s HA tech preview is now available
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances

    Ubuntu is the industry-leading operating system for use in the cloud. Every day millions of Ubuntu instances are launched in private and public clouds around the world. Canonical takes pride in offering support for the latest cloud features and functionality.

    As of today, all Ubuntu Amazon Web Services (AWS) Marketplace listings are now updated to include support for the new Graviton2 instance types. Graviton2 is Amazon’s next-generation ARM processor delivering increased performance at a lower cost. This

Service Router Linux/SR Linux for Server Appliance

Filed under
Server
  • Nokia Dives Into Data Center Market With Switch Platform

    Nokia likes to talk about scalability a lot. So, it’s no surprise that scalability is at the heart of the company’s new data center strategy.

    The telecommunications vendor today unveiled its new switching portfolio, which includes a new network operating system, intent-based networking tool kit, and switch hardware. With these components, Nokia aims to help cloud providers and data center builders keep with up with the exponential growth in traffic spurred by emerging technologies like 5G, edge compute, and IoT.

    “We see a big opportunity,” said Steve Vogelsang, CTO of Nokia’s IP and optical networks group. “We’ve got an opportunity to improve data center networking for all cloud builders. This is not only targeting the webscalers, but the tier-two public clouds, software service providers, enterprises, and of course the telcos as they build out the telco cloud.”

    The idea, he explains, is to give this wide demographic of customers the tools they need to ensure a high degree of automation as they scale out to mitigate changes in traffic across their infrastructure.

    [...]

    The first prong of Nokia’s data center strategy is founded on a new network operating system called Service Router Linux, or SR Linux for short.

  • Nokia announces generational step in data center networking; new OS and tools give cloud builders unprecedented ability to adapt, automate and scale

    Nokia SR Linux is a genuine architectural step forward as it is the first fully modern microservices-based NOS, and the SR Linux NDK (NetOps development kit) exposes a complete and rich set of programming capabilities. Applications are easily integrated through modern tools like gRPC (remote procedure call) and protobuf, with no recompiling, no language limitations and no dependencies. SR Linux also inherits Nokia’s battle-tested Internet protocols from the service router operating system (SROS), which is the trademark of the huge installed base of Nokia carrier-grade routers. SR Linux is in effect the industry’s first flexible and open network application development environment.

20 Things to Know for Becoming a Successful Linux System Administrator

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Linux system administrators are people who are responsible for managing IT infrastructures that are powered by Linux. It is one of the most sought after positions by modern enterprises. Competetive sysadmins are always in high demand and will get rewarding workplace benefits. But, what does it take to become a successful sysadmin? If you’re a seasoned Linux user who wants to try his hand at system administration, this guide is for you. Today, we will discuss some of the key aspects of becoming a Linux admin. You will find out the things a competitive system admin needs to know from this guide.

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Ade Malsasa Akbar on CloudTube and Mailo

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Best Linux distros of 2020 for beginners, mainstream and advanced users

Different Linux distros can all work with Linux software and applications, and of course, any cloud-based apps that run through a browser. However, Linux distros come with a variety of different ranges of bundled software. Some might come with a lot of basic applications already pre-installed, while others will have the barest minimum. And, as mentioned, Linux is very customizable, far beyond what normal Windows or Mac users may be used to. Users can commonly configure everything from their desktop to security and privacy settings. Altogether, this is why it helps to have a good idea of what different Linux distros can offer. Do you need a GUI more familiar to Windows? Are you more concerned about privacy? How comfortable are you with typing commands rather than clicking icons? Read more

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