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Server: MAAS 2.3.0 Alpha 3, Microsoft is Down, Microservices and Containers

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  • MAAS 2.3.0 Alpha 3 release!

    MAAS has now introduced an improved hardware testing framework. This new framework allows MAAS to test individual components of a single machine, as well as providing better feedback to the user for each of those tests.

  • Microsoft's AI is so good it steered Renault into bottom of the F1 league

    Microsoft on Sunday bragged its artificial intelligence technology is behind the, er, success of a massively underperforming Renault Formula One team.

    In a poorly timed bit of marketing, the Redmond software giant talked up its partnership with the racing team just as the latter finds itself sitting 433 points behind leader Mercedes.

    Microsoft says the Renault team – running 7th out of 10 in the 2017 Formula One Constructor Standings – uses everything from Azure Machine Learning, to Stream Analytics, to Dynamics 365, to help it not win.

  • Outlook and Hotmail DOWN: Webmail users furious as Microsoft admits problems could 'last another 24 hours' - Mirror Online
  • Microservices and containers: 6 things to know at start time
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  • This Week in Numbers: New Monitoring Methods for Kubernetes

    Our new report, The State of the Kubernetes Ecosystem reports on a survey of 470 container users, 62 percent of which were at least in the initial production phase for the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine. After further screening, we were able to get detailed information from 208 people about the storage and monitoring technologies they use with Kubernetes.

    Prometheus is by far the most cited tool among our survey respondents for monitoring Kubernetes clusters. Heapster, however, has also gained significant adoption among our group. Traditional monitoring vendors are not faring as well, although usage levels for their tools appear to increase when they are being integrated into a larger, custom monitoring platform.

  • How to avoid a GDPR compliance audit: Best practices

    How can CIOs prepare for the impending GDPR privacy regulations? Here are four strategies for Linux environments

Containers: Kubernetes, Heptio, and Oracle

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  • Kubernetes, containers help mainstream open-source software

    Open-source software is now a key part of the tech world, matching proprietary software through a combination of enthusiastic developers, organizations and shared standards. This trend is especially visible in the world of container technology, a popular virtualization method for deploying and running distributed software applications.

    “Open source is the mainstream now. It’s very hard to release a proprietary product right now and come up with some justification about why you have to do it,” said Steve Pousty (pictured), lead developer advocate, OpenShift Online, at Red Hat Inc.

  • Heptio Raises New Funding to Close Kubernetes Operational Gaps

    Craig McLuckie helped launch the open-source Kubernetes project while at Google and has been busy since November 2016 with his new company Heptio. Heptio is now moving forward, thanks to a $25 million Series B round of funding, bringing total funding to date for the startup to $33.5 million.

    "Kubernetes is doing really well, there is a lot of energy in the ecosystem, and many companies are making Kubernetes a core part of their operating practices," McLuckie told eWEEK in a video interview.

  • Oracle Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation in Kubernetes Push

    Oracle has taken a plunge deeper into open source waters by joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a platinum member. The announcement was made Wednesday, on stage with Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles. In addition, Oracle announced it's bringing Kubernetes to Oracle Linux and open sourcing a Terraform Kubernetes Installer for Oracle Cloud. This prompted Zemlin to remark that "six of the largest clouds are now running Kubernetes."

  • Larry Ellison: There is No One Left for Oracle to Buy

    Oracle isn't likely to be buying any other big companies soon, according to founder Larry Ellison.

Servers: IBM, Sumo Logic, and Canonical

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  • IBM Touts Top-Notch Security in Next-Gen Linux Mainframe

    IBM on Tuesday launched LinuxOne Emperor II, the second generation of its open source mainframe computer system. The new model has a layer of security and privacy not seen in a Linux-based platform before, the company said. "We saw in our success stories for Emperor that security was a recurring theme attracting new customers to the platform," noted Mark Figley, director of LinuxOne Offerings at IBM. "Later, our experience with blockchain ... reinforced that lesson for us," he said.

  • Sumo Logic Cloud Study Highlights Linux, NoSQL and Docker

    At first glance, the numbers in Sumo Logic's State of Modern Applications in the Cloud 2017 report that was released on Tuesday don't seem to match what's being reported elsewhere. The first graph, a pie-chart titled "Breakdown of Customers," seems to indicate that Amazon Web Services has a 64 percent share, followed by "Others" with 26.4 percent, "Multi-Cloud" at 5.8 percent, and at the bottom Microsoft Azure with a pitiful 3.8 percent. There's no mention of Google Cloud Platform or IBM's Bluemix at all.

  • Canonical & Microsoft Enable Ubuntu Containers with Hyper-V Isolation on Windows

    Canonical's Dustin Kirkland announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux OS recently teamed up with Microsoft to enable Ubuntu containers to run on Windows systems with Hyper-V isolation.

    If you've ever dreamed of running your own Linux apps on a Windows machine, using your favorite GNU/Linux distro, which, in this case, is Ubuntu, we have some good news for you, as it's now possible to run Docker containers on Windows 10 and Windows Servers.

Red Hat and Servers, IBM Mainframes

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Databases: Oracle in Cloud Native Computing Foundation, New dbKoda Release

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OSS
  • Oracle joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation, adds new container services

    As the excitement around software containers reaches fever pitch, database software giant Oracle Corp. is throwing its weight behind the cause.

    The company said Wednesday it’s signing up as a platinum member of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, the organization leading the development of the Kubernetes container orchestrator tool. In addition, the company has just made Kubernetes available on its Oracle Linux platform, and will also open-source a Terraform Kubernetes Installer for its cloud infrastructure.

  • Oracle Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation as Platinum Member
  • dbKoda 0.7.0 new features

    0.7.0 is the second public release of dbKoda and our first post-MVP release. With the MVP (Minimal Viable Product) we definitely nailed the “M” criteria, and in this release we’ve pushing harder on the “V” side of the equation.

  • Southbank Software Introduces dbKoda, an Open Source Database Development Tool for MongoDB

    Southbank Software recently released its initial offering of dbKoda version 0.6.0, an open source MongoDB development tool packaged with JavaScript, React and Electron. As shown below, dbKoda’s graghical user interface features a connection manager and a feature-rich code editor for working with MongoDB databases.

Ed Warnicke's Talk About Networking and DevOps

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  • Open-source tech unites networking and DevOps

    In the tech world, innovation and new systems are great, but nothing moves unless the network can handle it. This truth makes networking very important for businesses, because a company can only be as agile as its network. Part of that agility comes from making the network easy to use. Open-source tech is coming to the rescue.

    “The truth is, there’s a lot of work that goes into making the network invisible and ubiquitous for people,” said Ed Warnicke (pictured), distinguished consulting engineer at Cisco Systems Inc. “In particular, one of the challenges that we see arising as the world moves more cloud native, as the microservices get smaller, as the … the shift happens toward serverless, as Kubernetes [container orchestration management] is coming on with containers is that the network is really becoming the runtime, and that runtime has the need to scale and perform like it never has before.”

  • Open Source Summit: It's Time for DevOps and Networking to Talk

    Warnicke delivered a lighting keynote talk titled, Bridging the Divide: Brining Network and DevOps People Together to Build a Unified Cloud Native Future. Warnicke started off his talk by outlining the shift in networking over the last decade from bare metal server needs to virtual machines.

    With Virtual Machines, networking vendors built overlay network topologies and approaches that have enabled virtual networking

Oracle: Liberating Java EE and Joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

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  • Red Hat Gives Thumbs Up to Java EE's Move to Eclipse

    So Java Enterprise Edition has a new home.

    Yesterday Oracle announced it's turning control of the platform over to the nonprofit Eclipse Foundation. On the surface, this makes a lot of sense, as the foundation's namesake project is the most widely used Java IDE. The announcement came just a month after Oracle said it was considering moving control of the platform to an open source foundation.

    All of the details have yet to be ironed-out, but in a blog Oracle's David Delabassee said that Oracle-led Java EE and related GlassFish technologies, including RIs, TCKs, and associated project documentation, will be re-licensed to the foundation, presumably under the Eclipse Public License. In addition, the project will be rebranded with a not yet determined new name.

  • Java EE to Eclipse: A Welcome Move

    In a blog post on the venerable Aquarium blog (started by the Glassfish team at Sun a decade or so ago) Oracle has announced that it has selected the Eclipse Foundation as the new home for Java EE. They will relicense and rename it and invent a new standards process. It looks like the MicroProfile rebellion was successful as this has all been negotiated with Red Hat and IBM as well.

    I don’t see this move as “dumping” Java EE. Moving a project to an open source Foundation is complex and expensive and Oracle should be congratulated on finally committing to this move. Java EE has already been uploaded to GitHub, but that’s not sufficient as the default Github Governance is isolation mediated via pull requests.

    Eclipse is an extremely good choice of host. It has evolved excellent governance that recognises both the primacy of technical contribution and the inevitability of corporate politics and keeps both in balance. It’s ideally suited to the complexities and politics of Java EE, having hosted multiple large projects and survived de-investment by its founder IBM. Under the smart and firm leadership of Mike Milinkovich, Eclipse is the perfect home for Java EE (or whatever Oracle will want us to call it).

  • Oracle opens up enterprise Java and moves it to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Java EE Is Moving to the Eclipse Foundation
  • Tech’s old guard continues to embrace Kubernetes, as Oracle joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Oracle has always been a little more pragmatic about the role of open-source software in the tech industry than a company like Microsoft, which fought the very concept tooth and nail for years. Still, now that both companies have joined the foundation at the heart of one of the most important open-source projects in enterprise tech at the moment, it’s another sign the center of gravity has shifted.

  • ​Oracle joins the Kubernetes movement

    Oracle joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation and released Kubernetes on Oracle Linux and its own Kubernetes cloud installer.

IBM’s 'New Gen' LinuxONE

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Linux
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Red Hat News

OSS: Blockchain, Innersource, SQL and Clang

  • Banks are turning to open source for blockchain, says Google engineer
    Banks have historically developed all software in-house and maintained a fierce secrecy around their code, but more recently they’ve embraced open-source. They’re likely to use open source for one of the most hotly tipped technologies out there – blockchain.
  • Innersource: How to leverage open source in the enterprise
    Companies of varying sizes across many industries are implementing innersource programs to drive greater levels of development collaboration and reuse. They ultimately seek to increase innovation; reduce time to market; grow, retain, and attract talent; and of course, delight their customers. In this article, I'll introduce innersource and some of its key facets and examine some of the problems that it can help solve. I'll also discuss some components of an innersource program, including metrics.
  • Reflection on trip to Kiel
    On Sunday, I flew home from my trip to Kiel, Germany. I was there for the Kieler Open Source und LinuxTage, September 15 and 16. It was a great conference! I wanted to share a few details while they are still fresh in my mind: I gave a plenary keynote presentation about FreeDOS! I'll admit I was a little concerned that people wouldn't find "DOS" an interesting topic in 2017, but everyone was really engaged. I got a lot of questions—so many that we had to wrap up before I could answer all the questions.
  • A quick tour of MySQL 8.0 roles
    This year at the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference in Dublin, I'll be discussing a new feature introduced in MySQL 8.0: roles. This is a new security and administrative feature that allows database administrators to simplify user management and increases the security of multi-user environments. In database administration, users are granted privileges to access schemas, tables, or columns, depending on the business needs. When many different users require authorization for different sets of privileges, administrators have to repeat the process of granting privileges several times. This is both tedious and error-prone. Using roles, administrators can define sets of privileges for a user category, and then the user authorization becomes a single statement operation. Roles have been on the MySQL community's wish list for a long time. I remember several third-party solutions that tried to implement roles as a hack on top of the existing privileges granting system. I created my own solution many years ago when I had to administer a large set of users with different levels of access. Since then, anytime a new project promised to ease the roles problem, I gave it a try. None of them truly delivered a secure solution, until now.
  • MyDiamo Expands Open Source Database Encryption Offerings to Include PostgreSQL
  • Clang-Refactor Tool Lands In Clang Codebase
    The clang-refactor tool is now living within the LLVM Clang SVN/Git codebase.

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1

Openwashing and Microsoft FUD