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Servers: Kubernetes, Sysadmin and More

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Server
  • Kubectl: Developer tips for the Kubernetes command line - Red Hat Developer

    Get started with in-cluster configuration, sudo-like user impersonation, and the new kubectl debug command in the kubectl Kubernetes CLI.

  • New developer onboarding features in Red Hat OpenShift 4.6 - Red Hat Developer

    Developers asked for a more intuitive path to the developer perspective, so we’ve created one.

    Starting with OpenShift 4.6, non-privileged users logging into the OpenShift console for the first time will land on the developer perspective by default.

    Once in the developer perspective, first-time users are offered a guided tour of the user interface (UI). Developers who opt-in to the tour are guided through UI areas, starting with the topology view. The demonstration in Figure 1 shows how to launch the guided tour.

  • Time management: must-have tools and strategies for sysadmins | Enable Sysadmin

    Learn to be intentional about planning out your daily tasks and remember to leave time for yourself, your family, and your friends.

  • Advantages of Using Linux Virtual Machine or Linux Server Hosting

    With Linux, you do not need to worry about security, and you can download software from the Internet. Many online sites offer you Linux hosting and Linux server hosting. However, you have to check for the reliability and quality of the website. It should be an established website with many years of experience.

    You can check the Linux hosting and Linux server hosting providers and determine which one will suit your requirements. They should have enough information on their website so that you can get all the relevant details. The website should also explain the technicalities well. The website should provide details about the services offered and the cost that you will have to pay.

4 Best Free and Open Source Linux FTP Servers

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Server
Software

File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a time-honored method of transferring files to and from a remote network site. FTP is built on a client-server architecture and uses separate control and data connections between the client and server applications. The FTP client connects to the FTP server, and enables the user to send and retrieves files from that server.

FTP is one of many different file transfer protocols that are used. Other examples include the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), BitTorrent, the SSH File Transfer Protocol (SFTP), and Secure Copy (SCP).

In recent years, FTP’s popularity for general downloading files has declined. Linux distributions and software are now often downloaded by using direct downloads using a web browser, by BitTorrent, metalink, or by using a download utility. FTP is often tucked away as a download option even if it is available. While FTP can cause bandwidth problems it nevertheless remains a great way of moving large files.

The downside to using FTP is that it doesn’t necessarily take internet security risks into account. SFTP, the more advanced version of the same technology, enables you to manage files on your server just like FTP does. However, it uses a previously-established Secure Shell (SSH) connection to maintain the safety of your files and the site as a whole.

An FTP server is a software application which enables the transfer of files from one computer to another. Here’s our recommendations.

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How Many Users Can Open Source Zoom Alternatives Handle?

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Server
OSS
Web

Zoom has been a boom since Coronavirus started, it seemed to be one of the very few software in the world capable of handling the planet’s digital transfer of most face-to-face communication since people were forced to stay in their homes during the quarantine. Governments, schools, universities, hospitals, companies, enterprises… All of them went to Zoom in order to face the new communication hassle.

Its stock market increased by %500 since the beginning of the pandemic, and tens of of millions of new users worldwide signed up for its premium plans. Everything sounded so great so far for Zoom, unlike most of the human race standing on the other side of the equation.

Until, an investigational report by the FTC showed that Zoom lied about its end-to-end encryption for years, and that its so-called E2E secure communication is actually false marketing. Of course, users and developers around the world had no way of verifying Zoom’s marketing claims easily since it was a proprietary, closed-source application. And thus, they were not able to check the source code by their selves to verify those claims.

Zoom being fully proprietary is why people started switching into open source zoom alternatives, like Jitsi, BigBlueButton and many others, so that they don’t remain in Zoom’s jail locking all their remote communications in one place.

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10 years and 10 million cores: charting OpenStack’s greatest achievements

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Server
Ubuntu

At the heart of OpenStack, as with many open source projects, is a thriving community. Jonathan Bryce, Executive Director at the newly renamed Open Infrastructure Foundation which sits behind OpenStack, feels this is it’s finest work. “OpenStack’s greatest achievement is our community – a growing group of diverse contributors, users, and vendors who have enabled OpenStack to be one of the top three most active open source projects, in addition to Linux and Chromium.”

And while not always seen as being ‘mainstream tech’, the numbers are staggering. Bryce continued: “Over 100,000 individuals from 187 countries continue to support a project that is running over 10 million cores in production, powering critical infrastructure like banks, telecoms, railroads, retailers, hospitals, and more. I am so proud of the work that our community puts in daily to keep the world running on OpenStack.”

One of the biggest issues any technology can experience is scalability. Growing fast enough to suit demand, but also ensuring that the tech can deliver consistent quality as it does so. But these views of community – and its growth – are echoed by Georgi Georgiev, CIO of Japan’s SBI Bits: “Finding the appropriate technologies to build a virtual environment is a challenge of its own. OpenStack solved this problem by putting together a great stack of projects, and more impressively, built a community around it to support. This is the best that could have happened for open source, with OpenStack being available freely to everyone, while also enabling companies to package it up and sell while improving the product together.”

Talking of growing fast, OpenStack’s complimentary nature as a companion to the ever scalable public cloud provides organisations with the best of both worlds according to Tytus Kurek, Product Manager, at Canonical: “Although public clouds have almost dominated the cloud computing market, OpenStack adoption continues to grow every year. This is because OpenStack continues to deliver a cost-effective extension to the public cloud infrastructure, allowing organisations to take control over their budget. As one of the biggest contributors to the OpenStack project, Canonical is looking forward to seeing what the next 10 years will bring.”

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Also: Why Linux Should Factor Into Your Security Strategy

Server: SysAdmin Stuff and Kubernetes

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GNU
Linux
Server

  • Terraform vs Ansible: What's the Difference?

    The way DevOps as a culture is gaining momentum, tools like Ansible and Terraform witnessing a huge demand and popularity.

    Both tools are considered as Infrastructure as Code (IaC) solutions which helps in deploying code and infrastructure. While Ansible acts as a configuration management solution commonly abbreviated as “CM”, Terraform is a service orchestration or provisioning tool.

    Note that there are overlaps and these terms are not necessarily mutually exclusive. This is what confuses people and this is why I am going to compare Ansible and Terraform.

    I'll explain what are these tools used for, what are their pros and cons. This will help you decide whether you should use Ansible or Terraform in your projects.

  • An Introduction to the Kubernetes Operator Pattern (YouTube)

    Earlier this year I did a short talk for Halihax, a local technology community, providing an introduction to the Kubernetes operator pattern. This was my first attempt at giving any kind of a talk (outside of demos at work), but hopefully it will prove useful to someone out there.

  • Sysadmin tales: Take a look back at an old school IT prank | Enable Sysadmin

    Set your Wayback Machine to the early ’80s. Disco was dead and gone, pop rock was making waves, and consumer computers were available enough that some schools started figuring out that teaching computers was something they should do.

    My school was one of those—the lovely Manheim Township High School in Neffsville, PA. A classroom was repurposed as a computer lab, as the prior computer area was barely larger than a closet and only had four terminals connected to some type of "miniframe" computer, with one Apple II computer on a rolling cart.

    [...]

    Now, the cable to connect the computer to the monitor was pre-VGA; it was just a simple RCA connector, as everything was monochrome. No screws to help hold the connector on tight. My friend and I (I don’t recall who had the idea, but I’d like to think it was me) decided to cross-wire all the monitors, so the monitor for one seat was connected to the computer at another seat. We did it side-by-side where we had to, but the ones on the island were really fun as we could connect them so the computer on one side of the table would drive the monitor on the other side of the table.

  • Create your first Knative app | Opensource.com

    Knative is an open source community project that adds components to Kubernetes for deploying, running, and managing serverless, cloud-native applications. It enables more productive development with less interaction with Kubernetes' infrastructure.

    There is a large amount of information out there about Knative, networking, and serverless deployments, and this introductory tutorial covers just a bite-size amount of it. In this walkthrough, I'll use Knative with Minikube to create a Knative app—a simple container that prints messages in response to a curl command or in a web browser at a link provided by the deployment.

How I use Cockpit for my home's Linux server management

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Linux
Server
HowTos

Cockpit is a service for Linux that provides a web-based interface for managing and monitoring hosts. It can be deployed in any size organization, even a small office, and it's a great way for home users to maintain the family IT infrastructure. I use it to manage and monitor all of the computers in my house—including Raspberry Pi.

Cockpit is a free and open source software project released under the LGPL v2.1+. It is sponsored by Red Hat and included in Red Hat Enterprise Linux as the RHEL Web Console.

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The 20 Best Kubernetes Tools For Managing DevOps Projects

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Server

Writing applications for multiple operating environments is one of the major requirements for a developer nowadays. Kubernetes has got the attention as it eliminates the restrictions and extends the core capabilities of the containers. Besides, discoverability, observability, horizontal scaling, and load balancing are the other benefits that Kubernetes can offer through its collection of pods that can perform similar functions. Management has become easy, and we can also use the Deployment Controller to achieve scalability, visibility, time savings, and control over versions. Kubernetes tools are also there to extend the functionalities and eliminate the imposed restrictions for better performance and help you check out the list of seemingly-exhaustive features of Kubernetes.

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Kubernetes in Ubuntu

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Server
Ubuntu
  • Exploring ROS 2 with Kubernetes | Ubuntu

    Kubernetes provides many critical attributes that can contribute to a robust robotics platform: isolated workloads, automated deployments, self-configuring work processes, and an infrastructure that is both declarative and immutable. However, robots designed with ROS 2 face challenges in setting up individual components on Kubernetes so that all parts smoothly work together. In this blog series, we construct a prototype ROS 2 system distributed across multiple computers using Kubernetes. Our goal is not only to provide you with a working configuration, but also to help you understand why it succeeds and overcome future design challenges.

    Getting into Kubernetes can be a pretty steep learning curve, so our prototype will use MicroK8s to make it easy. MicroK8s is a lightweight pure-upstream Kubernetes distribution and offers low-touch, self-healing, highly-available clusters. Its low resource footprint makes it ideal for running on robot computers. Even with very little Kubernetes experience you’ll quickly have a complete cluster up and running.

    This article will introduce some of the core concepts for our prototype design. Follow-on articles instantiate a ROS 2 talker/listener prototype on a single computer, then extend the prototype with alternative options and distributing compute across multiple computers.

    [...]

    Within a single pod, containers can reach each other on the localhost address (127.0.0.1), and the host machine’s loopback interface is attached to each container. However, since all pods use the same actual interface, they must coordinate port usage so that no two pods communicate using the same port at the same time.

    Should multiple containers within a single pod listen on the same port (for example, identical containers all hosting a web server on port 80), a Kubernetes service can be defined to expose the application and route incoming to containers. However, Kubernetes services typically perform port or address translation which, as we discussed earlier, interferes with ROS 2 communications. Kubernetes services cannot be used for ROS 2 network traffic.

    Additionally, ROS 2 does not provide a method for managing ports used by RTPS. For example, a container can not change the standard RTPS discovery port of 7400, nor can a ROS 2 listener select a port other than its default. As a result, port usage can not be coordinated across multiple ROS 2 containers running in the same pod, and these containers generally will not be able to communicate.

  • How Kubernetes is transforming the industrial edge | Ubuntu

    In recent years, various platforms have emerged to support agile digital factory DevOps, but most industrial edge platforms have been held back by limitations to application scaling and management – and this is where Kubernetes at the edge comes in.

    Kubernetes is a container orchestration system. Containers make it possible to manage applications independently from their underlying technologies, and since factories are often highly heterogeneous environments, this independence is invaluable. Kubernetes simplifies matters even further by enabling an automated approach to scaling and managing large numbers of containerised applications across distributed infrastructure.

    Kubernetes is already well-established in the cloud arena, and the PAC RADAR report anticipates that it will soon gain traction at the industrial edge as organisations increasingly look to leverage cloud agility within their IoT environments. As the report explains: “Thanks to the latest innovations in the cloud world, we can predict quite easily what the next wave of ‘cloud-native’ innovations will bring to the industrial edge (and the data center). Kubernetes will be the next big thing at the edge, as it already is in the cloud.”

    In this respect, Canonical is ahead of the curve. MicroK8s is a fully containerised, lightweight, fast, and secure Kubernetes distribution optimised for edge and IoT production environments. As the report notes, MicroK8s has already reached 3,750 stars on GitHub – clearly demonstrating both its popularity and the developer appetite for Kubernetes at the edge. Additionally, MicroK8s offers a zero-ops experience, eliminating the main drawback to Kubernetes-based solutions identified in the report: complexity.

    Another advantage of Kubernetes is that it is multi-cloud, meaning it can integrate with cloud infrastructure across providers to enable further scalability beyond the edge. According to the report, this is another area in which Canonical excels thanks to Charmed Kubernetes: a composable Kubernetes distribution that can run on bare metal, VMware, Openstack and all major public clouds.

IBM Red Hat vs. SUSE: How do these Linux distributions stack up?

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE

IBM Red Hat and SUSE are the leading vendors in the open source enterprise Linux market, but how do these two builds compare?

Learn the history of IBM Red Hat vs. SUSE and compare numerous criteria -- including the architectures each supports and how each distribution addresses the learning curve -- as well as product support offerings, pricing and certifications.

Like other Linux distributions, RHEL and SUSE both support a comprehensive set of commands. When comparing these two distributions, it's worth noting that, although some commands are common to all Linux distributions, IBM Red Hat and SUSE also have their own command sets. Additionally, the commands these Linux distributions support tend to evolve over time.

[...]

Like any Linux distribution, SLES has a significant learning curve, particularly for those who are new to Linux OSes. However, SUSE does offer comprehensive training resources, including online and in-person classes.

SLES is sold as a one- or three-year subscription. The subscription cost is based on the number of sockets or VMs, the architecture and the support option the organization selects. A one-year subscription for an x86/x64 OS running on one to two sockets or one to two VMs with Standard support starts at $799.

SUSE offers two support options: Standard and Priority. Its Standard support plan includes assistance with software upgrades and updates, as well as unlimited technical support via chat, phone or web. Support is available 12 hours per day, five days per week, with a two-hour response time for Severity 1 issues and a four-hour response time for Severity 2 issues.

Read more

Also: Simply NUC mini data center > Tux-Techie

WordPress 5.6 Second Beta and WordPress Survey

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Server
Web
  • News – WordPress 5.6 Beta 2 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 beta 2 is now available for testing!

    This software is still in development, so we recommend that you run this version on a test site.

  • News – Take the 2020 WordPress Annual Survey (and view the 2019 results)! – WordPress.org

    For many years, WordPress enthusiasts have filled out an annual survey to share their experiences and feelings about WordPress. Interesting results from this survey have been shared in the annual State of the Word address and/or here on WordPress News.

    This survey helps those who build WordPress understand more about how the software is used, and by whom. The survey also helps leaders in the WordPress open source project learn more about our contributors’ experience.

    To ensure that your WordPress experience is represented in the 2020 survey results,

    Take the 2020 Annual Survey! (English)
    You can also take the survey in French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish! The survey will be open for at least 6 weeks, and results will be posted on this blog.

    [...]

    The WordPress Professionals group consists of those who: work for a company that designs/develops websites; use WordPress to build websites and/or blogs for others; design or develop themes, plugins, or other custom tools for WordPress sites; or are a designer, developer, or other web professional working with WordPress.

    This WordPress Professionals group is further divided into WordPress Company Pros (those who work for a company that designs/develops websites) and WordPress Freelancers/Hobbyists (all other professional types) subgroups.

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More in Tux Machines

Richard Hughes: fwupd 1.5.2

If you’re running 1.5.0 or 1.5.1 you probably want to update to this release now as it fixes a hard-to-debug hang we introduced in 1.5.0. If you’re running 1.4.x you might want to let the libcurl changes settle, although we’ve been using it without issue for more than a week on a ton of hardware here. Expect 1.5.3 in a few weeks time, assuming we’re all still alive by then. Read more

Xfce Virtual Machine Images For Development

The openSUSE distributions offer a variety of graphical desktop environments, one of them being the popular and lightweight Xfce. Up to now there was the stable tested branch available in Tumbleweed already during install. Furthermore, for interested users the development OBS repository xfce:next offered a preview state of what’s coming up next to Tumbleweed. Xfce Development in openSUSE Thanks to the hard work of openSUSE’s Xfce team there is a third option: Xfce Development Repository aka RAT In a playful way, a rat is meant to represent the unpolished nature of this release: a rat is scruffy looking compared to a mouse (the cute and beloved mascot of Xfce). And the RAT repository provides packages automatically built right from the Git Master Branch of Xfce upstream development. The goal of this project is to test and preview the new software so that bugs can be spotted and fixed ahead of time by contributing upstream. The packages pull in source code state on a daily basis and offer a quite convenient way to test and eventually help development. So this is where the team builds and tests the latest and unstable releases of Xfce Desktop Environment for openSUSE. Read more

Radeon RX 6800 Series Performance Comes Out Even Faster With Newest Linux Code

Last week we delivered AMD Radeon RX 6800 / RX 6800 XT Linux benchmarks and the performance was great both for Linux gaming as well as the OpenCL compute performance. But for as good as those Big Navi numbers were on the open-source Linux graphics driver stack, they are now even better. That launch-day testing was based on the Linux state in the second-half of October when the cards arrived and initial (re-)testing began in preparing for the Radeon RX 6800 series reviews -- not only the Radeon RX 6800 series but re-testing all of the other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards for the comparison too. Thanks to the rate of the open-source graphics driver progression and the newest code always being available, now just days after launch the numbers are even more compelling for Linux gamers with the slightly newer Linux 5.10 and Mesa Git compared to just weeks ago. In particular were the last minute NGG fixes and other Big Navi tweaks along with an important Radeon RX 6800 (non-XT) fix. There has also been other RADV improvements and more that accumulated in Mesa 21.0-devel this month. On the kernel side, Linux 5.10 is still at play. Both the old and newer Mesa snapshots were also on LLVM 11.0. Read more Also: Intel: AMD Gimps On Battery-Powered Laptop Performance - But DPTF On Linux Still Sucks - Phoronix

today's howtos

  • How to Install and Configure Hadoop on Ubuntu 20.04 – TecAdmin

    Hadoop is a free, open-source and Java-based software framework used for storage and processing of large datasets on clusters of machines. It uses HDFS to store its data and process these data using MapReduce. It is an ecosystem of Big Data tools that are primarily used for data mining and machine learning. Apache Hadoop 3.3 come with noticeable improvements any many bug fixes over the previous releases. It has four major components such as Hadoop Common, HDFS, YARN, and MapReduce.

  • How to create a Cloudwatch Event Rule in AWS

    A near-real-time stream of system events that describe changes in AWS resources is delivered by CloudWatch Events. We can create a rule that matches events and route them to one or more target functions. We can use CloudWatch Events to schedule automated actions. These actions can be self-triggered at certain times using cron or rate expressions. We can have EC2 instances, Lambda functions, Kinesis Data Streams, ECS tasks, Batch jobs, SNS topics, SQS queues, and a few more services as target endpoints for CloudWatch Events. To know more about Cloudwatch events, visit the official AWS documentation here.

  • How to use Bash file test operators in Linux

    File Test Operators are used in Linux to check and verify attributes of files like ownership or if they are a symlink. Every Test operator has a specific purpose. The most important operators are -e and -s. In this article, you will learn to test files using the if statement followed by some important test operators in Linux.

  • How To Install Wireguard on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Wireguard on CentOS 8. For those of you who didn’t know, Wireguard is an open-source, dependable, advanced, VPN tunneling software you can install and use right now to create a secure, point-to-point connection to a server. It is cross-platform and can run almost anywhere, including Linux, Windows, Android, and macOS. Wireguard is a peer-to-peer VPN. it does not use the client-server model. Depending on its configuration, a peer can act as a traditional server or client. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of the Wireguard VPN on CentOS 8.

  • How To Install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7 – TecAdmin

    NVM stands for Node Version Manager is a command-line utility for managing Node versions. Sometimes you required to deploy multiple node application with different-2 versions. Managing the multiple Node.js versions for differnt-2 projects are a pain for the developers. But NVM helped to easily manage multiple active Node.js versions on a single system. This tutorial will explain you to install NVM on CentOS/RHEL 7/6 systems and manage multiple Node.js versions.

  • How to install Kali Linux 2020.4 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Kali Linux 2020.4.

  • How to make your own personal VPN in under 30 minutes

    In the Distribution box, choose the newest available Ubuntu LTS release — as of the time of writing, that's 20.04 LTS. Below that, pick the region you want your VPN to be located in. It's possible to change the location later, but you'll have to contact Linode support. For the plan, select 'Nanode 1GB' from the list of Shared CPU options. VPNs don't need much processing power, so this low-spec option will work just fine.

  • Use nnn as a File Manager for Linux Terminal - Make Tech Easier

    If you have used the Linux terminal for an extended period of time, you probably know some of the useful commands, like cd to move into and out of folders, create new ones, and copy or move files. Still, you may prefer how desktop file managers are more user-friendly and quicker for some tasks. In that case, you’ll love nnn. nnn is the equivalent of a desktop file manager for the terminal. Although not an ultra-complex solution like Midnight Commander, nnn is light on resources, fast, and allows you to navigate your file system without having to type commands.