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Walmart takes its Amazon battle to the clouds

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When Amazon moved into brick and mortar with its Whole Foods purchase, many people assumed the battle between Amazon and Walmart for your retail dollar would move to the streets of America. The conflict will be fought there with drones, self-driving delivery trucks, and no-touch stores, but it will also be fought in Amazon's stronghold: The cloud.

While everyone knows about Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud, Walmart hasn't been neglecting the cloud either. Years ago, Walmart invested in the OpenStack cloud.

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Servers: Docker Hub, Internet Archive, DevOps...

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  • Building Images with Dockerfile and Docker Hub

    In this series previewing the self-paced Containers for Developers and Quality Assurance (LFS254) training course from The Linux Foundation, we’ve covered installing Docker, introduced Docker Machine, and some basic commands for performing Docker container and image operations. In the three sample videos below, we’ll take a look at Dockerfiles and Docker Hub.

    Docker can build an image by reading the build instructions from a file that’s generally referred to as Dockerfile. So, first, check your connectivity with the “dockerhost” and then create a folder called nginx. In that folder, we have created a file called dockerfile and in the dockerfile, we have used different instructions, like FROM, RUN, EXPOSE, and CMD.

  • What can developers learn from being on call?

    We often talk about being on call as being a bad thing. For example, the night before I wrote this my phone woke me up in the middle of the night because something went wrong on a computer. That’s no fun! I was grumpy.

    In this post, though, we’re going to talk about what you can learn from being on call and how it can make you a better software engineer!. And to learn from being on call you don’t necessarily need to get woken up in the middle of the night. By “being on call”, here, I mean “being responsible for your code when it breaks”. It could mean waking up to issues that happened overnight and needing to fix them during your workday!

  • Making the Internet Archive’s full text search faster.

    The Internet Archive is a nonprofit digital library based in San Francisco. It provides free public access to collections of digitized materials, including websites, books, documents, papers, newspapers, music, video and software.

    This article describes how we made the full-text organic search faster — without scaling horizontally — allowing our users to search in just a few seconds across our collection of 35 million documents containing books, magazine, newspapers, scientific papers, patents and much more.

  • DevOps: More Than Automation

    Type “devops” into any job search site today and the overwhelming majority of results will be for some variation of “DevOps Engineer”. The skills required will centre on tools like Puppet/Chef/Ansible, AWS/Azure, scripting in Python/Perl/Bash/PowerShell etc. Essentially, they’ve taken a deployment automation engineer role, crossed out “deployment automation” and written “DevOps” in its place.

The What, Why and Wow! Behind the CoreOS Container Linux

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Unlike most Linux distributions, CoreOS doesn’t have a package manager. Instead it takes a page from Google’s ChromeOS and automates software updates to ensure better security and reliability of machines and containers running on clusters. Both operating system updates and security patches are regularly pushed to CoreOS Container Linux machines without sysadmin intervention.

You control how often patches are pushed using CoreUpdate, with its web-based interface. This enables you to control when your machines update, and how quickly an update is rolled out across your cluster.

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Linux owns supercomputing

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Linux
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The US is falling behind in the supercomputer race, but no matter where a supercomputer is running, one thing remains true: It's running Linux.

In the latest Top500 Supercomputer competition, which was revealed in June 2017, 498 out of 500 supercomputers were running Linux. Of the remaining two, both ran Unix.

These were a pair of Chinese IBM POWER computers running AIX near the bottom of the list. These machines came in at 493 and 494. Since the November 2016 Top500, these supercomputers have dropped by over 100 places. At this rate, Linux will score a clean sweep in the next biannual Top500 competition.

When the first Top500 supercomputer list was compiled in June 1993, Linux was barely more than a toy and hadn't adopted Tux as its mascot yet. Starting in 1998, when it first appeared on the Top500, Linux quickly dominated supercomputing.

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Servers: Infrakit & LinuxKit, CMTL, ServiceMaster, Synology, Ubuntu, and NeuVector

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  • Why Infrakit & LinuxKit are better together for Building Immutable Infrastructure?

    Let us accept the fact – “Managing Docker on different Infrastructure is still difficult and not portable”. While working on Docker for Mac, AWS, GCP & Azure, Docker Team realized the need for a standard way to create and manage infrastructure state that was portable across any type of infrastructure, from different cloud providers to on-prem. One serious challenge is that each vendor has differentiated IP invested in how they handle certain aspects of their cloud infrastructure. It is not enough to just provision n-number of servers;what IT ops teams need is a simple and consistent way to declare the number of servers, what size they should be, and what sort of base software configuration is required. Also, in the case of server failures (especially unplanned), that sudden change needs to be reconciled against the desired state to ensure that any required servers are re-provisioned with the necessary configuration. Docker Team introduced and open sourced “InfraKit” last year to solve these problems and to provide the ability to create a self healing infrastructure for distributed systems.

  • CMTL Testing First Linux Based Intel® Server Board

    The board is designed for HPC workload environments requiring parallel computing processing performance. Up to 72 cores for optional support and 100Gb/s node interconnect. Six slots for DDR4, 2400Mhz registered ECC DIMMS to achieve a capacity of 384G.

  • [Older] DNS Infrastructure at GitHub

    At GitHub we recently revamped how we do DNS from the ground up. This included both how we interact with external DNS providers and how we serve records internally to our hosts. To do this, we had to design and build a new DNS infrastructure that could scale with GitHub’s growth and across many data centers.

  • ServiceMaster polishes DevOps process for Linux container security

    ServiceMaster Global Holdings Inc., which owns consumer brands such as Terminix, Merry Maids, Furniture Medic and ServiceMaster Clean and Restore, deploys 75,000 service trucks to residential driveways each day. Five years ago, the company was taken private by an equity firm, and new leadership, including a new CIO, was brought in to modernize its operations. When it returned to the public market in 2014, the company had completely overhauled its approach to IT.

  • My Love Affair with Synology

    In my "Hodge Podge" article in the October 2016 issue, I mentioned how much I love the Synology NAS I have in my server closet (Figure 1). I got quite a few email messages from people—some wanting more information, some scolding me for not rolling my own NAS, and some asking me what on earth I need with that much storage. Oddly, the Linux-running Synology NAS has become one of my main server machines, and it does far more than just store data. Because so many people wanted more information, I figured I'd share some of the cool things I do with my Synology.

  • Certified Ubuntu Cloud Guest – The best of Ubuntu on the best clouds

    Ubuntu has a long history in the cloud. It is the number one guest operating system on AWS, Azure and Google Cloud Platform. In fact there are more Ubuntu images running in the public cloud than all other operating systems combined.

    Ubuntu is a free operating system which means anyone can download an image, whenever they want. So why should cloud providers offer certified Ubuntu images to their customers?

  • Cloud Foundry and Kubernetes: Different Tools

    It’s difficult to compare programming languages and platforms, of course, but this was the analogy that most frequently came to mind last week. Cloud Foundry is unlikely to be as popular as it was shortly after it launched, when it was the only open source PaaS platform available. But this says little about Cloud Foundry, and more about the platform market which – like every other infrastructure market – is exploding with choice to the point of being problematic. It also ignores the ability for the Cloud Foundry foundation to actively embrace this choice via the addition of Kubo.

  • Ubuntu OpenStack Pike Milestone 2

    The Ubuntu OpenStack team is pleased to announce the general availability of the OpenStack Pike b2 milestone in Ubuntu 17.10 and for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via the Ubuntu Cloud Archive.

  • NeuVector Releases Open Source Tools to Help Enterprises Evaluate Kubernetes 1.6 Deployments for CIS Benchmark Compliance

Servers Leftovers

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  • Cloud Native Apps and Security: The Case for CoreOS Rkt and Xen

    CoreOS's rkt started at the beginning of 2014 as a security-focused alternative to Docker. The project aimed to create a signature verification of cloud-native apps by default; the intention was to guarantee the integrity of the apps. It also stepped away from the central-daemon design of Docker, which requires root privileges for all operations. By contrast, the rkt process is short-lived, limiting the chances of being exploited, and some of rkt commands can be executed as unprivileged user.

  • U.S. Slips in New Top500 Supercomputer Ranking

    Tapwrit was the second favorite at Belmont, and Sunway TaihuLight was the clear pick for the number-one position on TOP500 list, it having enjoyed that first-place ranking since June of 2016 when it beat out another Chinese supercomputer, Tianhe-2. The TaihuLight, capable of some 93 petaflops in this year’s benchmark tests, was designed by the National Research Center of Parallel Computer Engineering & Technology (NRCPC) and is located at the National Supercomputing Center in Wuxi, China. Tianhe-2, capable of almost 34 petaflops, was developed by China’s National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), is deployed at the National Supercomputer Center in Guangzho, and still enjoys the number-two position on the list.

  • Linux vs. Windows Server OS Comparison [Ed: Worst article I saw today. A few characters cannot sum up the amount of nonsense in it.]
  • The evolution of scalable microservices

    Today’s enterprise applications are deployed to everything from mobile devices to cloud-based clusters running thousands of multi-core processors. Users have come to expect millisecond response times and close to 100% uptime. And by “user” I mean both humans and machines. Traditional architectures, tools and products simply won’t cut it anymore. To paraphrase Henry Ford’s classic quote: we can’t make the horse any faster, we need cars for where we are going.

SUSE release Container-as-a-Service Platform

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Unless you've been living under an SCO UnixWare server you know that Docker, and other container technologies, are taking over IT. SUSE, the major European Linux company, also saw this coming, so it's releasing its all-in-one Linux and container platform: SUSE Container-as-a-Service (CaaS) Platform.

SUSE's not the first to try this approach. CoreOS Container Linux gets that honor. But CaaS is providing a solid SUSE Enterprise Linux Server (SLES)-based container platform for modern enterprises turning to containers for their IT needs.

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Servers News: COTS and Kubernetes

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  • The Evolution of the Standard COTS Server in Modern Data Centers [Ed: COTS is a buzzword that expands into two more buzzwords (that are in it); reject marketing slant that subjugates geeks and 'consumers']

    Standardization on x86 commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) servers within the data center has been a movement for some time because the architecture offers versatility, cost-savings, easier integrations, more attractive maintenance and management profiles, and, overall, a lower total cost of ownership than a proprietary hardware approach. But there are new requirements that are driving data center server choices these days, namely the need to support carrier virtualization, programmability, and the massive data sets that come with machine learning and advanced, real-time analytics.

  • Federated Kubernetes with on-prem Clusters and Juju

    In this post we discus our efforts to setup a Federation of on-prem Kubernetes Clusters using CoreDNS. The Kubernetes Cluster version used is 1.6.2. We use Juju to deliver clusters on AWS, yet the clusters should be considered on-prem since they do not integrate with any of the cloud’s features. The steps described here are repeatable on any pool of resources you may have available (cloud or bare metal). Note that this is still a work in progress and should not be used on a production environment.

  • [Older] CoreOS Brings Kubernetes-as-a-Service to Enterprise

    CoreOS today said it added features to its enterprise container-orchestration platform that include Kubernetes-as-a-service.

    The upcoming Tectonic 1.6.4 will allow enterprises to deploy and manage the latest version of upstream Kubernetes across bare metal, public-, private-, and hybrid-cloud environments. The container company says this gives enterprises the flexibility of running their applications on the cloud, without cloud vendor lock-in.

TheSSS 22.0 Linux Server Out with Kernel 4.9.13, Apache 2.4.25 & MariaDB 10.2.6

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Server

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki is informing us today about the release and immediate availability for download of TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) 22.0 operating system.

TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) is one of the smallest and lightweight Linux-based operating systems designed to be used as an all-around server system for home users, but it's also suitable for deployment in small- and medium-sized businesses looking for a quick and painless way of distributing files across networks.

Based on the upcoming 4MLinux Server 22.0 operating system, the TheSSS 22.0 release is here with an up-to-date LAMP (Linux, Apache, MariaDB and PHP) server suite that consists of the Linux kernel 4.9.13 LTS, Apache 2.4.25, MariaDB 10.2.6, and PHP 7.0.19 (PHP 5.6.30 is available as well as an alternative for those who need it) components.

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CoreOS and OpenStack News

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  • CoreOS Container Linux on the Desktop!

    Live demo of Container Linux on the Desktop! How to run apps like Spotify and Chrome as well as basic workflow when your entire desktop is containerized. This will also go over the benefits gained from using Container Linux as a base OS and how to go about running it on the desktop.

  • Linode Launches Preliminary CoreOS Support

    With the rise of cloud-computing came many tools that have redefined the way we run applications on the Internet. Docker brought Linux containers (LXC) to new heights allowing applications to be tested and deployed quickly and in a reproducible manner. Containers went hand-in-hand with microservices architecture causing tools such as [Kubernetes][k8], created by Google, to be developed to help orchestrate scalable, Docker-based infrastructure. In an increasingly container-based world, new technologies at every level of the stack were created to adapt. At the operating system level, CoreOS was created and now Linode finally supports it.

  • Celebrating Clair v2.0.0, the container security scanner
  • [Older] OpenStack faces the challenges of cloud backups

    It seems that system administrators will never shake the need for backups, even when they shove everything into the cloud. At the OpenStack Summit in Boston last week, a session by Ghanshyam Mann and Abhinav Agrawal of NEC laid out the requirements for backing up data and metadata in OpenStack—with principles that apply to any virtualization or cloud deployment.

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Tablets, Chromebooks, and GNU/Linux Laptops

  • Diskio Pi Wants to Be the Ultimate Open Source Tablet Powered by Raspberry Pi
    A new open source project hit Kickstarter a few days ago, and it caught our attention because it appears to be a versatile machine that's fully compatible with Raspberry Pi and Odroid single-board computers. Created by Guillaume Debray, an optician with 10+ years experience in making and selling glasses, yet a passionate computer engineer with deep knowledge of programming and hardware assembly and manufacturing processes, the Diskio Pi project wants to be the ultimate open source tablet powered by Raspberry Pi. Diskio Pi is the result of 18 months of development, and, in fact, it seems to be some sort of versatile device built on top of a single-board computer. It's currently compatible with Raspberry Pi 2, Raspberry Pi 3, Raspberry Pi Zero, Odroid C1, and Odroid C2 SBCs, and can run Ubuntu, Debian, Raspbian Pixel, or Android.
  • The new Entroware Hybris could make a reasonable Linux gaming laptop
    Entroware, the UK-based Linux hardware vendor have released two newer laptops and one of them could be a reasonable gaming unit.
  • Chrome OS' Upcoming Night Light Feature Gets "Sunset to Sunrise" Automatic Mode
    The fantastic Chrome OS team over at Google is on a rampage, and after teasing us with the revamped sign-in/lock screens and new power management settings, today François Beaufort revealed yet another cool feature for our Chromebooks. This time, the developer announced on his Google+ page that the Chrome OS team is working on implementing an automatic "Sunset to Sunrise" mode for the upcoming Night Light feature, which should improve our sleep after using a Chromebook at night and ensures reduced strain on the eyes by limiting the amount of blue light emitted by the display.
  • CrossOver for Android Lets You Run Windows Apps on Intel-Based Chromebooks
    CodeWeavers‏, the commercial company behind the well-known CrossOver for Linux and Mac application that lets users install and run Windows apps and games is still working to release an Android version. Dubbed CrossOver Android, the project has been in development for the past year, and while it's still in an Alpha state, it looks like it is already capable of running Windows software on Intel-based Chromebooks and Android tablets. Since then, the project kept updating CrossOver for Android with new features.
  • Quick Reminder For The 2017 Linux Laptop Survey

Open Source Adreno Project “Freedreno” Receives New Update

Users of Freedreno, the open-source graphics driver support for Adreno on Linux distributions, will be pleased to know that a new update has been released in the past week. Lead developer Rob Clark discussed many of the details in his blog, which highlight above all the support for Adreno 500 series GPUs. Among the highlights include compute shaders for OpenGL and OpenGL ES, improved performance and improved Linux distribution support. Read more