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Server

Debian Server vs. Ubuntu Server Comparison

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Server
Debian
Ubuntu

When setting up a new server, a major concern that users may have is which OS to use. Many choices come into mind when it comes to the operating system to use, so selecting just one OS can be a tough choice. It is necessary for a user to compare different server types to select one that fits his or her requirements. In this article, we will compare and contrast Debian and Ubuntu servers.

Debian and Ubuntu servers are considered quite similar in many respects. Let us dig deep into a comparison of the two servers...

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Database HowTos and Yugabyte Funding

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Server
  • MySQL Drop a Column From Existing Table – Linux Hint

    MySQL Database Infrastructure is indeed a completely managed database service to build cloud-native apps. There are different cases where we perform different queries or commands to alter the database. Depending on the case, the ALTER expression is often included for the ‘ADD’, ‘Delete/DROP’ and ‘MODIFY’ commands. This tutorial guide will learn precisely how to remove a column from an existing table utilizing the MySQL DROP COLUMN clause.

  • MySQL Find Duplicate Values in Table – Linux Hint

    Redundant data can be kept in the table by the database program, influencing the database’s output in MySQL. Data replication, though, happens for different purposes, and it is an important job to identify the duplicate values in the table when dealing with a MySQL database. Broadly speaking, it is smart to use clear restrictions on a table often to store information that prevents redundant rows. Sometimes, in a MySQL database, you might like to calculate the number of repeated values. We addressed this question in this topic, in which you will learn about how to locate duplicate values through different ways and how to count duplicate values.

    To get started, you must have MySQL installed on your system with its utilities: MySQL workbench and command-line client shell. After that, you should have some data or values in your database tables as duplicates. Let’s explore this with some examples. First of all, open your command-line client shell from your desktop taskbar and type your MySQL password upon asked.

  • Open-source relational database startup Yugabyte raises $48M

    Open-source relational database startup Yugabyte Inc. said today it has raised $48 million in new funding to accelerate the launch of its fully managed Yugabyte Cloud offering.

    The Series C round was led by Lightspeed Venture Partners and included Greenspring Associates, Dell Technologies Capital, Wipro Ventures and 8VC. Including the new funding, Yugabyte has raised $103 million to date.

CMS: Kiwi TCMS 10.0 and WordPress 5.7 Release Candidate 2

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Server
  • Kiwi TCMS 10.0

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 10.0!

  • WordPress 5.7 Release Candidate 2

    The second release candidate for WordPress 5.7 is now available!

    [...]

    Thank you to all of the contributors who tested the Beta/RC releases and gave feedback. Testing for bugs is a critical part of polishing every release and a great way to contribute to WordPress.

Server: Istio 1.9.1, Kubernetes, k3d and CNCF

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Server
  • Istio / Announcing Istio 1.9.1

    This release fixes the security vulnerability described in our March 1st, 2021 news post as well as bug fixes to improve robustness.

    This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.9.0 and Istio 1.9.1.

  • ISTIO-SECURITY-2021-001

    This issue only affects Istio 1.9.0; previous versions of Istio are not affected. This issue has been given a CVSS score of 8.2 by the Istio product security working group.

  • Power To The Kubernetes People

    Big Blue shelled out an incredible $34 billion to buy open source infrastructure software juggernaut Red Hat, and it is determined not to just tend and

  • Introduction to k3d: Run K3s in Docker | SUSE Communities

    k3d is a small program made for running a K3s cluster in Docker. K3s is a lightweight, CNCF-certified Kubernetes distribution and Sandbox project. Designed for low-resource environments, K3s is distributed as a single binary that uses under 512MB of RAM. To learn more about K3s, head over to the documentation or check out this blog post or video.

    k3d uses a Docker image built from the K3s repository to spin up multiple K3s nodes in Docker containers on any machine with Docker installed. That way, a single physical (or virtual) machine (let’s call it Docker Host) can run multiple K3s clusters, with multiple server and agent nodes each, simultaneously.

  • Sysdig Contributes eBPF Components to CNCF

    Sysdig, Inc. recently announced that it has contributed the sysdig kernel module, eBPF probe, and Falco libraries to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The contributed source code will be moved into the Falco organization, a cloud-native runtime security project and de facto Kubernetes threat detection engine, which was also contributed to the CNCF by Sysdig.

  • Sysdig contributes Falco’s kernel module, eBPF probe, and libraries to the CNCF

    Today, I’m excited to announce the contribution of the sysdig kernel module, eBPF probe, and libraries to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The source code of these components will move into the Falco organization and be hosted in the falcosecurity github repository.

Databases: MySQL and PostgreSQL Technical Manuals (New)

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Server
  • How to Install MySQL on Linux Mint 20 and Ubuntu 20.04?

    MySQL is an open-source, simple, and relational database that uses SQL (Structured Query Language) to manage and manipulate the data.

  • MySQL Add a Column to Existing Table

    MySQL Database System is a highly scalable database service for creating cloud-native applications. Therefore we have to perform different operations while working on it. The ALTER TABLE declaration is being cast-off to add, remove, or alter columns while working on an already existing table in any schema of MySQL. We’ll teach you exactly how to declare a column to an existing table utilizing the MySQL ADD COLUMN expression in this guide.

  • MySQL Count Matching Records With COUNT

    Data redundancy occurs for a lot of reasons. Several of the complicated duties you should cope with while working with database systems is trying to discover duplicate values. For this purpose, We will be using the COUNT() aggregate method. The COUNT() method returns the sum of rows residing in a specific table. The COUNT() function permits you to sum all rows or only rows matching the condition defined. In this guide, You’ll get to know how to identify duplicate values for one or maybe more MySQL columns using COUNT().

  • MYSQL Import Data from CSV File – Linux Hint

    A CSV or comma-separated value document is a delineated text document that distinguishes values from a comma. Every line is its information record. Each data, parted by commas, comprises one or extra fields. The origin of the title for this document layout is the usage of the comma as a field divider. For sharing information between various programs, such documents are used. For instance, Database and contact administrators also endorse CSV files. The theory is that from one program to a CSV document, you may transfer complex information and afterward import the information in that CSV document to some other program. In this tutorial, we will learn how to import data from a CSV file into MySQL workbench. Let’s get started.

  • MYSQL Find Matching Records with LIKE – Linux Hint

    The MySQL LIKE operator tests if a particular character string resembles the pattern mentioned. We will match a portion of the overall data present in a segment that doesn’t need to match precisely. We will cup tie our keyword with the sequence of the information available in columns by using wildcard query in various combinations. MySQL Wildcards are symbols that help match difficult criteria with search results and have been used in combination with a compare operator called LIKE or a contrast operator called NOT LIKE.

  • MySQL Limit Results Returned With LIMIT – Linux Hint

    You eventually hit the stage where data volume greatly increases when we start to deal with DBMS like MySQL. It is difficult for us to manage and use. MySQL has built-in capabilities that make it easy to handle. In MySQL, the LIMIT clause is being used to cut down the number of rows throughout the result set using the SELECT expression. We will discover how to use the MySQL LIMIT clause in this guide to restrict the number of rows that a query returns.

  • MySQL Sort Results with ORDER BY Statement – Linux Hint

    While working with MySQL queries, the results are obtained in the same sequence as the records inserted into the schema utilizing the SELECT command. It’s the standard order for sorting. You would be aiming at how we might arrange our query result. Sorting is re-arranging the outputs of our query in a defined manner. Sorting may be done on one field or more than one field. The ORDER BY statement is being used to arrange the query results in an ascending or descending order in MySQL. The ORDER BY statement organizes data by default in go-up order if ASC or DESC is not specified. The DESC term is being used to organize the data in descending way.

  • MySQL Subqueries – Linux Hint

    A subquery is a SQL query within a greater query that is recursive, or a subquery is considered an internal query. In contrast, an outer query is termed as the query that includes the subquery. A MySQL subquery can be embedded in the queries, including SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE. Furthermore, within another subquery, a subquery may be nestled. The phrase subquery should be closed in brackets wherever it is used. We’ll teach you how and when to use MySQL subquery to compose complicated queries and describe the idea of the associated subquery. Open the command-line shell from your desktop and write your password to start using it. Press Enter and continue.

  • PostgreSQL FAQs – Linux Hint

    According to StackOverflow’s 2020 Annual Developer Survey, PostgreSQL is the second most popular database management system available, and this is not without good reason. Since its initial release in 1996, PostgreSQL, or Postgres, has improved considerably, adding several useful features, including user-defined types, table inheritance, multi-version concurrency control, and more.
    PostgreSQL is also very lightweight, easy to set up, and can be installed on several platforms, such as containers, VMs, or physical systems. Besides its default GUI, pgAdmin, Postgres also supports over 50 other IDEs, a third of which are free to use. This article will cover some of the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) about PostgreSQL.

Istio 1.7.8 Released

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Server

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.7.7 and Istio 1.7.8

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Also: Support for Istio 1.7 has ended

MariaDB 10.5.9 Release Notes

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Server

MariaDB 10.5 is the current stable series of MariaDB. It is an evolution of MariaDB 10.4 with several entirely new features not found anywhere else and with backported and reimplemented features from MySQL.

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5 Free and Open Source Lightweight Alternatives to WordPress

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Server
Web

Now don’t get us wrong, WordPress is one of our favorite applications. With good reason, it’s a high quality, open source blog publishing application. It’s a mature and highly polished application with development starting in 2003, and it has an active community. The largest self-host blogging tool, a full content management system, which can be extended through thousands of widgets, plugins, and themes, is a good fit for many projects. The software was born out of a desire for an elegant, well-architectured personal publishing system built on PHP and MySQL.

WordPress instantly springs to mind when any project is planned that needs a content management system. However, WordPress can be complicated, offering more bells and whistles than actually needed or wanted. While it’s always tempting to stick with familiar territory, this can actually stifle creativity and does not enhance an individual’s skill-set.

When embarking on a new project, there’s a lot to be said experimenting with new software. Fortunately, WordPress is not the only option. There’s a good range of lightweight open source content management systems ready to be deployed that can transform a web site.

Some of the content management systems featured in this article are well publicised, but there are many good management systems that you may not have heard of that are perfectly suited for small projects.

Here is our verdict with our recommendations. They are all free and open source goodness.

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Also: HOWTO: Migrate from Ghost v3 to Squarespace

WordPress 5.7 Beta 3

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Server
Software
Web

This software is still in development, so it’s not recommended to run this version on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with it.

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Federated/Decentralised Communications With Movim and P2P VoIP

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Server
OSS
Security
Web
  • Movim | Basic Review & Beginner's Guide

    Once you read about Movim, immediately you will find about Xmpp. It is Jabber, also known as Xmpp, a secure, decentralized, and federated technology everyone can use to chat online existed strongly since 1990's. To give you how great Xmpp network is, actually when you use WhatsApp you use Xmpp, so does with Google Talk and Jitsi, so when you use those you are using Xmpp. To give you a few of its benefits, Xmpp is not controlled by a single company (so unlike Twitter) it is hard to shut down by anyone.


  • Daniel Pocock: Comparing private and peer-to-peer VoIP solutions

    One of the top questions people ask RTC developers around Valentine's Day is whether we finally have a private solution people can use to communicate with their partner.

    There is fresh attention on the issue this year after Twitter and other large providers flexed their muscles and demonstrated that they are more powerful than the US President.

    [...]

    Achieving independence from cloud services doesn't necessarily give you privacy. There are trade-offs to be made. John Goerzen recently published a blog about privacy issues in current P2P tools.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, and SMLR

Review: Artix Linux in 2021

Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring alternative init software options, including OpenRC, runit, and s6. The distribution is available in many editions, including Base, Cinnamon, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, KDE Plasma and Xfce. With all of the desktop options, combined with the available init choices, there are 21 editions, not including community spins from which to choose. All editions appear to be built for 64-bit (x86_64) machines. Picking randomly, I selected Artix's Plasma edition featuring the runit init software. The download for this edition is is 1.3GB. Browsing the other editions it looks like most flavours are about 1.1GB to 1.3GB in size, though the minimal Base edition is a compact 618MB. The project's live media boots to the KDE Plasma desktop. On the desktop we find multiple documentation and README icons. There is also an icon for launching the system installer. The default layout places a panel at bottom of the screen where we can find the application menu and system tray. The default wallpaper is a soft blue while the theme for windows and menus is dark with high contrast fonts. [...] Artix Linux is one of those distributions I really enjoy using and yet struggle to review in a meaningful way because it doesn't really go out of its way to introduce new or exciting features and everything works smoothly. The distribution is wonderfully easy to install, offers top-notch performance, and is unusually light on resources. Artix is somewhat minimal, but still ships enough software to be immediately useful right out of the gate. We can browse the web, install packages, view files, and play videos. Meanwhile the application menu isn't cluttered with a lot of extras. The developers clearly expect us to install the functionality we need, while doing a really good job of providing enough for the desktop environment to feel base-line useful right from the start. Artix does a nice job of balancing performance and functionality while also juggling ease of use against not getting in the way. There is a little documentation, but no initial welcome screen or configuration wizards that might distract the user. The one piece I felt was missing was a graphical package manager which would have made it easier to build the extra functionality I wanted on top of the base distribution. However, that one piece aside, I felt as though Artix was really well designed and put together, at lease for someone like me. It's not a distribution geared toward beginners, it's not a "first distro". It is a bit minimal and requires command line knowledge. However, for someone with a little experience with Linux, for someone who doesn't mind the occasional trip to the command line or installing new applications as needed, then Artix provides an excellent experience. It's fast, light, looks (in my opinion) great with the default theme, and elegantly walks the line between minimalism and having enough applications ready to go out of the box to be immediately useful. I'm unusually impressed with how smooth and trouble-free my experience was with this distribution and the fact it offers such a range of desktop and init diversity is all the more appealing. Read more

Alpine Linux Review: Ultimate Distro for Power Users

Alpine Linux is gathering a lot of attention because of its super-small size and focus on security. However, Alpine is different from some of the other lightweight distros we covered on FOSSLinux. It isn’t your typical desktop distribution as it is terminal-based like Arch and is marketed as a “general purpose distro.” It is currently widely adopted as a Docker container thanks to its ultra-small footprint. However, it can be used for all sorts of Linux deployments that benefit from small, resource-efficient Linux distros. Now, that statement might feel too generic. But don’t worry, as we have put together an in-depth and comprehensive review of Alpine Linux, giving you a detailed look at what it has under the hood and how to use it. As such, by the end, you should have a clear understanding of whether you should consider Alpine Linux as your next Linux distro. So without further ado, let’s dive in. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • How to manipulate strings in bash

    Without explicit support for variable types, all bash variables are by default treated as character strings. Therefore more often than not, you need to manipulate string variables in various fashions while working on your bash script. Unless you are well-versed in this department, you may end up constantly coming back to Google and searching for tips and examples to handle your specific use case. In the spirit of saving your time and thus boosting your productivity in shell scripting, I compile in this tutorial a comprehensive list of useful string manipulation tips for bash scripting. Where possible I will try to use bash's built-in mechanisms (e.g., parameter expansion) to manipulate strings instead of invoking external tools such as awk, sed or grep. If you find any missing tips, feel free to suggest it in the comment. I will be happy to incorporate it in the article.

  • Python Generators

    Python generators are very powerful for handling operations which require large amount of memory.

  • We got lucky

    If you’re having enough production incidents to be able to evaluate your preparation, you’re probably either unlucky or unprepared ;) If you have infrequent incidents you may be well prepared but it’s hard to tell. Chaos engineering experiments are a great way to test your preparation, and practice incident response in a less stressful context. It may seem like a huge leap from your current level of preparation to running automated chaos monkeys in production, but you don’t need to go straight there. Why not start with practice drills? You could have a game host who comes up with a failure scenario. You can work up to chaos in production.

  • React Testing Library – Tutorial with JavaScript Code Examples

    This post will help you to learn what React Testing Library is, and how you can use it to test your React application. This tutorial will assume you already know some basic JavaScript and understand the basics of how React works. React Testing Library is a testing utility tool that's built to test the actual DOM tree rendered by React on the browser. The goal of the library is to help you write tests that resembles how a user would use your application, so that you'll have more confidence that your application work as intended when a real user do use it.

  • Why I Moved From Ops to DevOps (and why you might want to)