Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 5

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Big update today and probably a very awaited one: here is an important step on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. Let’s get the new Ubuntu Dock installed by default! For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

GNOME: 20 Years and GUADEC 2017

Filed under
GNOME
  • 20 years strong
  • The ups and downs of 20 years with the GNOME desktop

    Way back in 1999 I did the unthinkable, I migrated away from my favorite window manager, AfterStep, to begin a journey with GNOME, a desktop that was born two years prior and was finally ready for the public. That was GNOME 1 and it was something special. I remember the excitement at having a desktop that could, finally, stand toe to toe with Windows. Yes, I had grown accustomed to the highly flexible AfterStep interface. I loved being able to have window transparencies across the board and special effects that blew away the minds of every Windows user I knew. However, all of those window managers I'd worked with to that point were missing something—a level of professionalism that would allow others to take the desktop seriously.

  • GUADEC 2017

    I arrived to Manchester on July 27 at 12:20 p.m. and the weather surprised me with a strong rain. It may be more surprising when you live in a city were it does not rain. Then I had to go to the Manchester Metropolitan University where many of the GNOME contributors would be hosted. When the bus stopped on the Manchester Metropolitan University I went to the first building of it I see and asked how to get to the Birley Fields, our accomodations. A man told me the directions and gave me a map. After some minutes walking I got the office that assigns the rooms to the new residents. I met there Mario, a guy from GNOME who is involved in Flatpak. It was interesting to talk with him in English when at the end we realized that we both could speak in Spanish. After leaving my stuff on my room, I left the room to walk outside and I found David King. It was incredible because it was almost three years we didn’t see to each other. In that day, I also met hadess (Bastien Nocera). He helped me to get a traveler adapter. This was also the day of pre-registration in a bar called KROBAR. I got joined to the GStreamer folks who I met before in GUADEC 2014. Some of the guys came up with the idea that the GNOME logo needs a new design. I talked about it before on the #gnome-design channel. I also met ystreet00 (Matthew Waters) who helped once to create a GStreamer plugin with OpenGL.

  • GUADEC 2017 Notes

    With GUADEC 2017 and the unconference days over, I wanted to share a few conference and post-conference notes with a broader audience.

    First of all, as others have reported, at this year’s GUADEC, it was great to see an actual increase in numbers of attendees compared to previous years. This shows us that 20 years later, the community as a whole is still healthy and doing well.

  • GUADEC 2017

    This year is my second one attending GUADEC, this time around, in Manchester. It was a great experience this time too, because I got to meet again with the friends I made last year, but also I got to make new friends as well.

    During the core days I attended a lot of great talks and I got to learn cool new things. Among these, I could mention learning about technologies that I didn’t know they existed, like Emeus, improve my view about how a good design should look like or discover more about the history of GNOME. Since this year I am a GSoC student again, I also had a lightning talk and I’m happy to say that this year I was slightly less nervous about talking in front of a lot of people.

  • GUADEC 2017, part 3: unconference days
  • GUADEC 2017, part 4: Manchester, United Kingdom

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 4

Filed under
GNOME

Let’s continue on our journey on transforming the current default session in Ubuntu Artful with a small change today. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

An Early Look at Ubuntu Dock for GNOME Shell in Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark)

Filed under
GNOME

Ubuntu 17.10, the next major release of the widely-used Ubuntu Linux OS, will be transitioning to the GNOME Shell user interface by default instead of the Unity desktop environment that was used until now.

Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 3

Filed under
GNOME

After introducing yesterday a real GNOME vanilla session, let’s see how we are using this to implement small behavior differences and transforming current Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

Filed under
GNOME
Debian
  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday

    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.

  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today

    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer!

    Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!

  • Happy birthday, GNOME!

    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!

  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday

    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 2

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Let’s continue our journey and progress on transforming current Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

Read more

GUADEC and GNOME: Birthday Photos and More

Filed under
GNOME
  • Happy 20th Birthday, GNOME!

    There have been 33 stable releases since the initial release of GNOME 1.0 in 1999. The latest stable release, GNOME 3.24 “Portland,” was well-received. “Portland” included exciting new features like the GNOME Recipes application and Night Light, which helps users avoid eyestrain. The upcoming version of GNOME 3.26 “Manchester,” is scheduled for release in September of this year. With over 6,000 contributors, and 8 million lines of code, the GNOME Project continues to thrive in its twentieth year.

  • It’s always fun to be at GUADEC

    As usual I would like to thanks the GNOME foundation for sponsoring my trip to Manchester to enjoy such a wonderful conference and give me the opportunity to present to the community the work I been doing on Glade’s UI for the past few months.

  • Wrapping up GUADEC 2017

    I’m now back home after attending GUADEC 2017 in Manchester, followed by a week of half-vacation traveling around the Netherlands and visiting old friends. It was a fantastic opportunity to meet others in the GNOME community once again; having gone to a few hackfests and conferences in the past two years, I now recognize many friendly faces that I am happy to get a chance to see from time to time.

    [...]

    This GUADEC conference had the best social event on Saturday night: a GNOME 20th birthday party, complete with cake, old farts Q&A panel, trivia quiz, raffle, and a blast from the past dance floor with music from back when GNOME started. There was even an afterparty way into the small hours … which I did not go to because my talk was in the first slot on Sunday morning!

GNOME at 20: Four reasons it's still my favorite GUI

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME desktop turns 20 on August 15, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!

Read more

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 1

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Let’s start with the ground work and differentiate our two “ubuntu” and “gnome” sessions. Until today, they were pixel by pixel identical.

Now are migrating some GNOME Session changes as well as some GNOME Shell ones in Artful.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Announcing Season of KDE 2018

KDE Student Programs is pleased to announce the 2018 Season of KDE for those who want to participate in mentored projects that enhance KDE in some way. Every year since 2013, KDE Student Programs has been running Season of KDE as a program similar to, but not quite the same as Google Summer of Code, offering an opportunity to everyone (not just students) to participate in both code and non-code projects that benefits the KDE ecosystem. In the past few years, SoK participants have not only contributed new application features but have also developed the KDE Continuous Integration System, statistical reports for developers, a web framework, ported KDE Applications, created documentation and lots and lots of other work. For this year’s Season of KDE, we are shaking things up a bit and making a host of changes to the program. Read more

How To Get Started With The Ubuntu Linux Distro

The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we'll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.) Read more

today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.