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GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 13

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Now that GNOME 3.26 is released, available in Ubuntu artful, and final GNOME Shell UI is confirmed, it’s time to adapt our default user experience to it. Let’s discuss how we worked with dash to dock upstream on the transparency feature. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME 3.26 is Available on Ubuntu Artful, Video Tour of Beta

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GNOME
Ubuntu

GNOME and KDE: Dash to Dock, GNOME Shell, Librem 5, Krita and Randa

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KDE
GNOME
  • Dash to Dock v61 Released with Unity-Style Launcher Backlights

    An updated version of Dash to Dock — the hugely popular desktop dock for GNOME Shell — is available to install.

    Dash to Dock v61 adds official support for the recent GNOME 3.26 release, an addition that will be of particular note to those of you running Ubuntu 17.10.

  • Replacement Telegram Tray Icons for GNOME Shell

    This posts shows you how to replace the colorful Telegram tray icon on Linux with a GNOME Shell colored white set. It's a simple tweak that anyone can do.

  • Librem 5 Crosses $400k In Funding After Plasma Mobile Announcement

    Since announcing earlier this week that KDE is working on Plasma Mobile support for the Librem 5, Purism has managed to raise over $100k more towards their goal of building a free software GNU/Linux smartphone, but remain around 1.1 million dollars short of their goal.

    The announcement of Plasma Mobile support -- while still planning to support GNOME on their device and it not being known yet if KDE/GNOME will be the default on the phone -- managed to gain a number of new supporters with crossing the $400k crowdfunding threshold this weekend.

  • David Revoy teaches Krita course at local university in Paris
  • Randa Report Part 2

    And now for the serious part: in my last blog post, I talked about achieving our main goal for this year’s Randa meetings – we successfully ported the entire Kontact away from the obsoleted KDateTime class. Since we finished this on Thursday, there was still enough time left to start working on something new and exciting.

    Volker and Frederik went on to work on a KWin plugin to simulate various kinds of color blindness which will help developers to see how visually impaired users see their software, I did a bit more code clean-up after the porting and a bit of code-review.

Ubuntu and GNOME Devs Team Up to Ease Your "Unity to GNOME" Transition

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is only a few weeks away, and it will be shipping with the recently released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, running on top of the next-generation Wayland display server.

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also: Canonical Adds Support for GNOME's JHBuild Tool to Its Snapcraft Snappy Creator

GNOME and KDE: Librem 5, KDE Accessibility, and GNOME 3.26 Release Video

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KDE
GNOME
  • Encrypted, Open Source Phone That Won’t Track Users Launches Crowdfunding Campaign

    Here’s the weird thing about ears: you can’t shut them. You can shut your eyes, but you can’t shut your ears.

    The same is true for our devices. While no one builds devices with built in covers for cameras, it’s easy to add one. Microphones are trickier. In fact, there’s a persistent conspiracy theory that Facebook constantly listens for buzzwords to trigger ads through the microphones on people’s phones.

  • ​KDE Partners With Purism To Create The “First Truly Free” Linux Smartphone

    Just last month, we told you about a new crowdfunding project launched by privacy-focused hardware maker Purism. The device was named Librem 5 and it was expected to ship with PureOS, an open source Debian GNU/Linux derivative.

  • Testing Applications for Color Blindness

    At the Randa Meeting 2017 Volker and I decided to write a little KWin plugin. Activating this plugin you can simulate various types of color vision deficiencies, either on individual windows or full-screen. The plugin works by running a fragment shader on the respective window/screen.

  • The Official GNOME 3.26 Release Video Has Arrived

    The GNOME 3.26 release arrived earlier this week, and now an official release video has popped out to help promote it.

    The 1 minute 51 second clip zips through all of the pertinent new details, including support for color emoji, many of the core app updates, and (of course) the spiffy new search layout and streamlined Settings app.

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 12

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GNOME
Ubuntu

We’ll focus today on our advanced user base. We, of course, try to keep our default user experience as comprehensible as possible for the wider public, but we want as well to think about our more technical users by fine tuning the experience… and all of this, obviously, while changing our default session to use GNOME Shell. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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More Coverage of GNOME 3.26 'Manchester'

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 'Manchester' desktop environment is here, Linux fans!

    When people think of Linux-based operating systems, they often imagine people typing in a terminal or coding in a basement while drinking Mountain Dew -- yeah, those stupid old stereotypes still exists, sadly. While that is surely part of the user base, other users choose an open source operating system for nothing more than using their computer as a tool. In other words, some folks use Ubuntu, Fedora, or other distros just to get normal stuff done -- word processing, web surfing, and more. No terminal. No coding. No religious-like experiences.

  • GNOME 3.26 Officially Released

    GNOME 3.26 has been officially released — hurrah! If you’ve been waiting on the official nod to pull the string of your celebratory party popper, that’s your cue!

  • GNOME 3.26 is great

    I am incredibly excited for GNOME 3.26, and it’s been hard to wait for it. I openly admit this fact. This release saw serious, important improvements all over the places, new features landed, some others didn’t, thousands of bugs were fixed all across the platform, and I’d like to share my personal highlights for this release.

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" is Out

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Debuts Officially, Here's What's New

    After six months of hard work, the GNOME Project's development team was proud to announce today, September 13, 2017, the immediate release and general availability of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    Dubbed "Manchester," after the city where the annual GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) developer conference took place this year, the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment packs many enhancements for the apps and core components included in the GNOME Stack, along with new features.

    This year, on August 15, the GNOME Project celebrated its 20th anniversary, and we couldn't be happier to be using GNOME as our main desktop environment. The biggest new features of the GNOME 3.26 release are support for emoji, Flatpak improvements, as well as a brand-new Control Center that's now called simply "Settings."

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    The GNOME Project is excited to announce the release of version 3.26, the latest version of GNOME 3. The new version is the result of six months’ hard work by the GNOME community, and comes packed with improvements and new features. Announcing the release, Matthias Clasen of the GNOME Release Team, said “We are happy and proud to announce GNOME 3.26, the latest major release of GNOME, “Manchester”, just a few weeks after we celebrated the 20th birthday of GNOME at GUADEC. As always, the GNOME community did a great job in delivering exciting features, completing translations, and refining the user experience. Thanks!”

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" has been officially released.

    Matthias Clasen announced a few minutes ago on the mailing list, "This release brings refinements to the system search, animations for maximizing and unmaximizing windows and support for color Emoji. Improvements to core GNOME applications include a redesigned Settings application, a new display settings panel, Firefox sync in the Web browser, and many more."

  • Introducing GNOME 3.26: “Manchester”

    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 24105 changes, made by approximately 778 contributors.

    3.26 has been named “Manchester” in recognition of this year’s GUADEC organizing team. GUADEC is GNOME’s primary annual conference and is only possible due to the amazing work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Manchester, UK, and was a big success. Thank you Team Manchester!

Preview of Next Month's Ubuntu and This Week's GNOME Release

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 5: New System Settings!

    Now, Ubuntu Artful gets a new System Settings with a fully-new interface from GNOME 3.25. It's officially renamed to Settings and it got big changes. It's very amusing to read Georges Staracas' article (the developer of Settings) especially the fact that more than 30.000 lines of code changed since v3.20 by 15 contributors! This means when finally released, Ubuntu 17.10 will include Settings by default. Now let us see the quick look at Artful here. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu’s Suru Icon Theme Is Being Revived

    If you loved the look of the Unity 8 desktop as used in Canonical’s shelved Ubuntu phone and tablet project, I can guarantee you’re going to love the following icon set.

    Why? Because it is the Ubuntu phone and tablet icon set!

    Yup, even though Ubuntu Touch died and Canonical (painfully) let the majority of its design team go, the story isn’t yet done for the Suru icon theme.

  • See What’s New in GNOME 3.26

    Today sees the release of GNOME 3.26 — and you’re probably wondering what new features are going to be on offer.

    [...]

    The GNOME desktop is made up of multiple parts. This includes the main user interface (called ‘GNOME Shell’) as well as core apps (like the file manager Nautilus), and ‘invisible’ background libraries and services that help glue everything together.

GNOME/GTK: OpenGL, WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0, GTK4's Vulkan Support and Icon Size

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Flickerless Gtk3 OpenGL Transitions

    While I got OpenGL transitions working under Gtk3 at the end of last year basically matching the Gtk2/Generic OpenGL quality the transition into and out of the OpenGL sequence wasn't very satisfying. And with access to HiDPI it was clearly even worse with an unscaled image momentarily appearing before the correct one.

  • LibreOffice Gets Flicker-Free OpenGL Transitions

    Last year McNamara got GTK3 OpenGL transitions working, but it was less than perfect. But now he's managed to provide flicker-less GTK3 OpenGL transitions after landing some improvements into LibreOffice Git.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 Brings WebDriver Support, Remote Inspector & Kinetic Scrolling

    The WebDriver support is interesting and allows easily automating/scripting interactions with the browser. WebDriver is just geared for WebKit-based browsers. Details on the WebDriver WebKitGTK+ support via this blog post. When time magically allows I would like to investigate the feasibility of using it for some automated browser benchmarks.

    On the developer front the WebCrypto API is now enabled by default. Additionally, there are APIs to allow overriding the popup menu of select elements and to create a WebKitContextMenuItem from a GAction.

  • GTK4's Vulkan Support Continues Maturing

    One of the questions that came up following our GNOME 3.26 feature overview was how GTK4's Vulkan renderer is coming along.

    It's coming along as is GTK4, albeit not ready for production use quite yet.

  • You need an application icon of at least 64×64 in size

    At the moment the appstream-builder in Fedora requires a 48x48px application icon to be included in the AppStream metadata. I’m sure it’s no surprise that 48×48 padded to 64×64 and then interpolated up to 128×128 (for HiDPI screens) looks pretty bad. For Fedora 28 and higher I’m going to raise the minimum icon size to 64×64 which I hope people realize is actually a really low bar.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox 58

  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features
    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.
  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations
    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.
  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool
    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0. The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.
  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows
    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.
  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on
    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.
  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues
    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design. While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons. Read more

Linux Foundation introduces the LF Networking Fund, harmonizes​ open source, open standards

The Linux Foundation is taking the first step to bring some commonality across its myriad network efforts by creating the LF Networking Fund (LFN). By creating a combined administrative structure, Linux Foundation said LFN will provide a platform for cross-project collaboration. LFN will form the foundation for collaboration across the network stack: the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation and testing. Read more

Openwashing Surveillance

  • Facebook Open Sources Detectron Object Detection
    The way big companies are open sourcing significant AI is both gratifying and slightly worrying. AI is the biggest revolution since we discovered fire and started making tools. FaceBook AI Research has added to the list of what is available by open sourcing its Detectron project.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection research
    Facebook's artificial intelligence research (FAIR) team today announced it would open-source its object detection platform Detectron, as well as the research the team has done on it.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection work: Watch out, Google CAPTCHA
    acebook has brought us one step closer to a Skynet future made a commitment to computer vision boffinry by open-sourcing its codebase for object detection, Detectron. Written in Python and powered by the Caffe2 deep learning framework, the codebase – which implements object-sniffing algos such as Mask R-CNN and RetinaNet – is available under the Apache 2.0 licence.