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GNOME

GTK: GTK+ Hackfest and WebKitGTK+

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GNU
GNOME
  • GTK+ Hackfest 2018

    As some of you may know, we had a GTK+ Hackfest on February 1st and 2nd in Brussels, Belgium. Matthias has already blogged and blogged again about the two days and detailed notes about all the things we discussed can be found here and here. He also has some nice pictures.

    From everything we discussed I'm mostly looking forward to migrating to GitLab so I can file a few GTK+4 bugs and mark quite a few of them as blockers for a 4.0 release. I hope this will happen as soon as possible since there are quite a few usability regressions in current gtk+ master compared to gtk3 and those need time to get ironed out.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 Adds Graphics ARIA Rolls, Horizontal Scroll Shortcut

    Released in time for this week's GNOME 3.28 beta milestone is the WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 release as the GNOME platform port of the WebKit layout engine.

    WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 has several notable changes ahead of its upcoming WebKitGTK+ 2.20 stable release. WebKitGTK+ 2.19.90 now has WebSockets communication respecting system proxy settings, the context menu is now shown via a long-press gesture, and there is support for Shift + mouse scroll for scrolling horizontally. There is also a zoom gesture fix.

GNOME/GTK: Librsvg, BuildStream, GTK, GStreamer

Filed under
GNU
GNOME
  • rsvg-bench - a benchmark for librsvg

    Librsvg 2.42.0 came out with a rather major performance regression compared to 2.40.20: SVGs with many transform attributes would slow it down. It was fixed in 2.42.1. We changed from using a parser that would recompile regexes each time it was called, to one that does simple string-based matching and parsing.

    When I rewrote librsvg's parser for the transform attribute from C to Rust, I was just learning about writing parsers in Rust. I chose lalrpop, an excellent, Yacc-like parser generator for Rust. It generates big, fast parsers, like what you would need for a compiler — but it compiles the tokenizer's regexes each time you call the parser. This is not a problem for a compiler, where you basically call the parser only once, but in librsvg, we may call it thousands of times for an SVG file with thousands of objects with transform attributes.

    So, for 2.42.1 I rewrote that parser using rust-cssparser. This is what Servo uses to parse CSS data; it's a simple tokenizer with an API that knows about CSS's particular constructs. This is exactly the kind of data that librsvg cares about. Today all of librsvg's internal parsers work using rust-cssparser, or they are so simple that they can be done with Rust's normal functions to split strings and such.

  • BuildStream Hackfest and FOSDEM

    I also wanted to sum up a last minute BuildStream hackfest which occurred in Manchester just a week ago. Bloomberg sent some of their Developer Experience engineering team members over to the Codethink office in Manchester where the whole BuildStream team was present, and we split up into groups to plan upcoming coding sprints, land some outstanding work and fix some bugs.

  • builders

    An idiom that has shown up in GTK4 development is the idea of immutable objects and builders. The idea behind an immutable object is that you can be sure that it doesn’t change under you, so you don’t need to track changes, you can expose it in your API without having to fear users of the API are gonna change that object under you, you can use it as a key when caching and last but not least you can pass it into multiple threads without requiring synchronization.
    Examples of immutable objects in GTK4 are GdkCursor, GdkTexture, GdkContentFormats or GskRenderNode.

  • GTK+ hackfest, day 2

    The second day of the GTK+ hackfest in Brussels started with an hour of patch review. We then went through scattered items from the agenda and collected answers to some questions.

  • GTK+ 4.0 Targeted For Its Initial Release This Fall, GTK+ 5.0 Development To Follow

    A few days back I wrote about how GTK+ 4.0 is being talked about for release this year and now a bit more specific timeline is in place.

    The past few days prior to FOSDEM in Brussels was a GTK+ hackfest. Among the items discussed when not banging on code was a GTK+ 4.0 road-map and coming out of this event in Belgium is a more solid understanding now that the initial GTK+ 4.0 release will be targeted for the fall of this year. There isn't any firm release plan at this time but at GUADEC (taking place in Spain this summer) they will revisit their plans to verify they can still ship this fall.

  • GStreamer has grown a WebRTC implementation

    Late last year, we at Centricular announced a new implementation of WebRTC in GStreamer. Today we're happy to announce that after community review, that work has been merged into GStreamer itself! The plugin is called webrtcbin, and the library is, naturally, called gstwebrtc.

    The implementation has all the basic features, is transparently compatible with other WebRTC stacks (particularly in browsers), and has been well-tested with both Firefox and Chrome.

  • GStreamer Lands A WebRTC Plugin

    The GStreamer multimedia framework now has mainline support for WebRTC.

    WebRTC is the set of protocols/APIs for real-time audio/video communication over peer-to-peer connections. WebRTC is supported by all major web browsers and more while now there is support within GStreamer too.

GNOME: Decorators, GTK+ and GNOME Mobile

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GNOME

GNOME and KDE in PureOS: diversity across devices

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux
GNOME

PureOS, a Free Software Foundation endorsed GNU distribution, is what Purism pre-installs on all Librem laptops (in addition to it being freely available for the public to run on their own compatible hardware or virtual machines). It comes with a GNOME desktop environment by default, and of course, since we love free ethical software, users can use KDE that is also available within PureOS. This is the future we will continue to advance across all our devices: a PureOS GNOME-first strategy, with other Desktop Environments (DEs), such as KDE, available and supported by Purism.

At Purism we want a unified default desktop environment, and considering that we have chosen GNOME to be the default on laptops, we hope to extend GNOME to also be the default on phones. The ability for users to switch is also very powerful, and having a strong, usable, and supported alternative—that is, KDE/Plasma—for the Librem 5 offers the best of the “unified default” world and the “usable user choice” worlds.

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Oracle Releases Solaris 11.4 Public Beta With GNOME 3 Desktop, Secure UEFI Boot

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OS
GNOME

After all the Oracle/Solaris controversies last year, it's good to see Oracle today releasing their first public beta of Solaris 11.4 as an update to the Solaris 11 operating system.

As previously reported, Solaris 11.4 has switched finally from the GNOME 2 desktop to now using the GNOME Shell. Solaris 11.4 Beta is shipping with GNOME 3.24 components for those doing a desktop installation.

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Original: It’s alive!

First Nautilus File Manager Release without Support for Desktop Icons Is Here

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GNOME

The first Nautilus (Files) file manager release to ship without support for handling desktop icons was released today as version 3.27.4 for the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

Nautilus 3.27.4 is now available for public testing, and it's the first release of the popular file manager that ships pre-installed with numerous GNU/Linux distributions to drop support for handling desktop icons, a decision already discussed here a few weeks ago, and which will have an impact on various distros like Ubuntu.

This means that Nautilus is done with handling desktop icons starting with the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment, not like GNOME 3 has offered support for desktop icons by default, as the user had to enable the functionality from the GNOME Tweaks app. But dekstop icons support is not dead in GNOME, at least not yet, as GNOME Project promises to re-implement the feature in the GNOME Shell interface.

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: GTK+ 4.0 and GIMP 2.10 Plans

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GNOME
  • GTK+ 4.0 Might Be Ready To Ship This Year With Its Many Toolkit Improvements

    Famed GNOME developer Matthias Clasen of Red Hat provided an update on the state of the GTK4 tool-kit during this week's DevConf.cz event in Brno.

    Clasen covered the differences in drawing, input, and widgets between GTK3 and GTK4. He also reiterated how the Vulkan renderer, OpenGL renderer, new GDK APIs, event controllers, and composite widgets are among the headline features for GTK+ 4.0.

  • GIMP Picks Up Better Debugging Support, Backtrace GUI

    Adding to the list of features for the long overdue GIMP 2.10 release is better debugging support.

    Being added to the GIMP code-base today is a backtrace GUI for displaying backtraces when critical crashes occur with this image manipulation program. With having this GUI, they hope those experiencing crashes will be more prone to reporting their bugs upstream to the developers. This backtrace GUI optionally supports GDB or LLDB debuggers.

GNOME: PipeWire and CSD Initiative

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GNOME
  • An update on Pipewire – the multimedia revolution – an update

    We launched PipeWire last September with this blog entry. I thought it would be interesting for people to hear about the latest progress on what I believe is going to be a gigantic step forward for the Linux desktop. So I caught up with Pipewire creator Wim Taymans during DevConf 2018 in Brno where Wim is doing a talk about Pipewire and we discussed the current state of the code and Wim demonstrated a few of the things that PipeWire now can do.

  • PipeWire Is Making Progress But Still Needs More Time To Mature

    PipeWire was announced last year as a new Red Hat projects with aspirations to be to video as PulseAudio is to audio on the Linux desktop. Other PipeWire goals include professional audio support equal to or better than JACK, full Wayland/Flatpak support, and more. Red Hat is making a lot of progress on PipeWire, but it's not yet ready to be the default on the Linux desktop.

    Red Hat's Christian Schaller has shared a status update on PipeWire after discussing the latest state with PipeWire creator Wim Taymans.

  • Introducing the CSD Initiative

    Unless you’re one of a very lucky few, you probably use apps with title bars. In case you’ve never come across that term, title bars are the largely empty bars at the top of some application windows. They contain only the window title and a close button, and are completely separate from the window’s content. This makes them very inflexible, as they can not contain any additional UI elements, or integrate with the application window’s content.

  • The CSD Initiative Is Pushing For Apps To Abandon Title Bars In Favor Of Header Bars

    GNOME developer Tobias Bernard has announced "The CSD Initiative" in a push for more applications to support client-side decorations and as part of that to abandon boring title bars in favor of modern header bars.

    By using client-side decorations (CSD) rather than server-side decorations, applications are able to draw their own title/header bars and that makes for more interesting possibilities to save precious screen real estate and be more innovative about packing additional functionality into what otherwise would be a rather empty bar on the screen.

It Just Got Easier to Try the Latest WebKit on Linux

Filed under
GNOME
Web

If you’ve been itching to toy with the latest development builds of WebKit on Linux you’ll be pleased to know it’s just gotten a bit easier.

It’s all thanks to the newly announced ‘Epiphany Technology Preview‘, a development version of the Epiphany web browser (also known as GNOME Web) running atop the latest WebKitGTK+ snapshot.

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Also: GNOME at FOSDEM 2018 – with socks and more!

Epiphany/WebKitGTK+ Nightlies

Filed under
GNOME
  • Announcing Epiphany Technology Preview

    If you use macOS, the best way to use a recent development snapshot of WebKit is surely Safari Technology Preview. But until now, there’s been no good way to do so on Linux, short of running a development distribution like Fedora Rawhide.

    Enter Epiphany Technology Preview. This is a nightly build of Epiphany, on top of the latest development release of WebKitGTK+, running on the GNOME master Flatpak runtime. The target audience is anyone who wants to assist with Epiphany development by testing the latest code and reporting bugs, so I’ve added the download link to Epiphany’s development page.

  • Epiphany Tech Preview Delivers Flatpak'ed WebKitGTK+ Browser Daily

    Thanks to several efforts coming together, there's now an Epiphany Technology Preview project delivering you a bleeding-edge GNOME web-browser in a sane and easily deployable manner.

    Epiphany Technology Preview delivers the latest Epiphany browser code built atop the latest development release of WebKitGTK+ and is updated on a nightly basis.

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More in Tux Machines

Blockchain and Hyperledger/FOSS

  • American Express Integrates Blockchain To Its Membership Rewards Program
    Financial services corporation American Express (AmEx) has announced a blockchain application to its Membership Rewards program in partnership with online merchant Boxed, Associated Press reported May 23. AmEx announced that it is integrating blockchain technology developed by Hyperledger, an open source blockchain project under the Linux Foundation, to let merchants design customized offers for AmEx cardholders in order to increase customer engagement.
  • Interview: Riccardo Spagni co-founder of a new open source blockchain
    South African cryptocurrency expert and lead maintainer of the Monero project Riccardo “fluffypony” Spagni has co-founded a new open source blockchain protocol named Tari. Tari is being built as a blockchain protocol for managing, transferring, and using digital assets, and is stewarded by a team based in Johannesburg. The Johannesburg-based team will work on building a blockchain protocol as a second-layer solution on top of Monero, leveraging the existing cryptocurrency’s security while offering a scalable and dynamic platform for digital assets.
  • CheapAir Ditches BitPay For Open-Source Bitcoin Payments
    Travel and accommodation website CheapAir.com has appeared to choose self-hosted payment processor BTCPay for its Bitcoin payments, shunning industry stalwart BitPay. [...] Coinbase revealed it was retiring its merchant processing function in April, a move which the cryptocurrency industry condemned for its disruptive consequences. BitPay, a processor which along with Coinbase continues to be arguably the best-known option for Bitcoin payments, appeared to miss out on wooing CheapAir, meanwhile, which has offered Bitcoin since 2014 and was the first ever travel agency world-wide to accept bitcoin.
  • Ontology (ONT) Develops its Open-source Triones Consensus System economic model
    The Ontology (ONT) team uses the blockchain technology and the Internet to explore in-depth levels of the information industry. The team’s plans include developing an open-source distributed trust ecosystem called Triones Consensus System that’s based on the Ontology chain network.

Linux 4.16.12, 4.14.44, 4.9.103, 4.4.133, and 3.18.110

Wine 3.9 Released

Mozilla: WebAssembly, Mozilla Test Pilot, VR and Bootstrap

  • Testing GNU FreeDink in your browser
    This is a first version that can be polished further but it works quite well. This is the original C/C++/SDL2 code with a few tweaks, cross-compiled to WebAssembly (and an alternate version in asm.js) with emscripten. Nothing brand new I know, but things are getting smoother, and WebAssembly is definitely a performance boost. I like distributed and autonomous tools, so I'm generally not inclined to web-based solutions. In this case however, this is a local version of the game. There's no server side. Savegames are in your browser local storage. Even importing D-Mods (game add-ons) is performed purely locally in the in-memory virtual FS with a custom .tar.bz2 extractor cross-compiled to WebAssembly.
  • Welcome Punam to the Test pilot team!
    A couple months ago Punam transferred from another team at Mozilla to join the Test Pilot team. Below she answers some questions about her experience and what she’s looking forward to. Welcome, Punam! [...] Before Mozilla I have worked with SonicWall, eBay and Symantec doing web development.
  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 7
    Missed us last week? Our team met in Chicago for a work week. If you had the chance to come and meet us at the CHIVR / AR Chicago meetup, thanks for swinging by. We strategized our short and long term plans and we're really excited to share what we're unfolding in the coming weeks.
  • Why bootstrap?
    Over the next few quarters, I'm going to focus my attention on Mozilla's experimentation platform. One of the first questions we need to answer is how we're going to calculate and report the necessary measures of variance. Any experimentation platform needs to be able to compare metrics between two groups. For example, say we're looking at retention for a control and experiment group. Control shows a retention of 88.45% and experiment shows a retention of 90.11%. Did the experimental treatment cause a real increase in retention or did the experiment branch just get lucky when we assigned users? We need to calculate some measure of variance to be able to decide. The two most common methods to do this calculation are the frequentist's two-sample t-test or some form of the bootstrap. In ye olden days, we'd be forced to use the two-sample t-test. The bootstrap requires a lot of compute power that just wasn't available until recently. As you can imagine, the bootstrap is all the rage in the Data Science world. Of course it is. We get to replace statistics with raw compute power! That's the dream!