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GNOME

GNOME's Nautilus 3.30 and GUADEC 2018 Report by Bin Li:

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GNOME
  • Nautilus 3.30

    It’s this time of the year again, a new Nautilus release is on its way to be delivered. This release has been increasing contributions and work done in a steady pace as it has been for the last years, which makes me happy as one of the maintainers of Nautilus. This release had around 140 major contributions (merge requests) including whole features, fixes and improvements. Against our willing, we have included more code than deleted by 3000 lines...

  • 5 Major Improvements Coming in Nautilus 3.30

    A number of major improvements are headed to Nautilus, aka Files, aka the file manager at the heart of the GNOME desktop environment.

    Nautilus 3.30 will feature a redesigned path bar, new toolbar options, and improve support when running on low resolution screens.

  • Bin Li: GUADEC 2018

    Backed from the fantastic GUADEC, now it’s summary time.

    When I flight to Malaga from Paris, an old guy with Ubuntu bag sit beside me, after a while I knew he’s Michael Hill, which I couldn’t find his photo for local news in BJGUG. It’s the GUADEC magic!!

    In core days I attended a lot of great talks in this year, I particularly enjoyed Benjamin Otte’s talk on “GTK4 Lightning talks”, Jonas Ådahl and Carlos Garnacho’s talk on “The infamous GNOME Shell performance”, Philip Withnall’s talk on “GLib: What’s new and what’s next?”.

    And after the core days, I took part in two workshops, “GitLab Workshop” by Ralf and “Flatpak Workshop” by Alexander Larsson. It’s a good chance to know the inside of flatpak, and learned how to use Gitlab CI in details.

    After that I attended the Video BoF, helped the video editing, and at that day I found the flowblade was removed in Debian 9 cause of dependency, and it crashed with source code, so I tried flatpak package, found it just show white blank image when I import images. I couldn’t find the fix (issue 508) at that time. So I forward to openshot, it could work at least, although it was very dis-fluency when review the video.

KDE and GNOME: Atelier, KDE neon Bionic Update, GUADEC 2018 and Dino

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KDE
GNOME
  • Atelier at The Developers Conference SP 2018

    As you may know, there are two events in every year that I try to attend, one is Campus Party and the resume of that is here, and the second is The Developers Conference.

    And last week the edition of TheDevConf Sao Paulo happened, and I was able to see my friends, connect with new people, and for the first time, I was able to coordinate one of the tracks with my friends Gedeane Kenshima and Fernando Veiga.

  • KDE neon Bionic Update

    The work to rebase KDE neon on Bionic is progressing. Apologies if it feels slow but it’s keeping our infrastructure busy while continuing with the xenial builds alongside. I’ve just managed to get the package version check to turn green which means all the packages are now built.

  • How was GUADEC for you?

    Did you come to GUADEC in Alméria? Did you decide to avoid the sweltering heat and stay home? Were you thwarted by visa bureaucracy?

  • GUADEC 2018

    From the 2th of July I have been travelling from Italy all the way to the south Spain by train, to attend GUADEC 2018. During this long trip, I didn’t just sleep, but I kept working on Fractal and some other cool things.

    [...]

    I was travelling with Tobias, and at some point we randomly met Bastian on the train from Madrid to Almera, so the travel turned into a hackfest on the train.

  • Filter expressions

    During my Google Summer of Code project I implement message search for Dino, a XMPP client focusing on ease of use and security.

Ubuntu/GNOME Theme and Improving GHashTable

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.10's New Community Theme Is Named Yaru, Here's What It Looks Like

    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche announced today the name and plans of the community theme that's being prepared for the upcoming Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release.

    As you're probably aware the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) operating system will feature brand-new system theme and icons by default for new installations, and the theme has been developed by various members of the Ubuntu community instead of Canonical's employees. Until today, the theme was known as Communitheme, but from now on it's called Yaru.

  • Didier Roche: Open The Cosmic Gate: A beautiful theme gets a beautiful name

    Communitheme has been a community effort from the start with an overwhelming amount of feedback from an even larger community. Surprisingly, the still ongoing discussion thread of more than 1500 messages hasn’t (yet?) broken discourse!

    However, the effort to refresh the look and feel of Ubuntu has gone way beyond just a theme. From the start, Sam Hewitt’s beautiful Suru icons were included and over time, the effort brought new system sounds and new cursors under its wing. Some of the design discussions have gone even further than this, but the desire to stay as close to upstream GNOME as possible has put most of those in the freezer for now. So, in order to reflect the broad scope and in light of its upcoming inclusion in Ubuntu, a new name is in order.

    [...]

    Note that screenshots are still Work In Progress, there is still some discussions about keeping the Ubuntu logo by default on the launcher or not and other fundamentals changes that the community can decide until the Cosmic Cuttlefish release.

  • A hash table re-hash

    Hash tables! They’re everywhere. They’re also pretty boring, but I’ve had GLib issue #1198 sitting around for a while, and the GNOME move to GitLab resulted in a helpful reminder (or two) being sent out that convinced me to look into it again with an eye towards improving GHashTable and maybe answering some domain-typical questions, like “You’re using approach X, but I’ve heard approach Y is better. Why don’t you use that instead?” and “This other hash table is 10% faster in my extremely specific test. Why is your hash table so bad?”.

    And unfairly paraphrased as those questions may be, I have to admit I’m curious too. Which means benchmarks. But first, what exactly makes a hash table good? Well, it depends on what you’re looking for. I made a list.

GNOME: GUADEC and and Fractal

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GNOME
  • GUADEC a la española

    But more important than food, for me GUADEC is always about the people, meeting new people, people you always respected (still can not believe I meet the legendary JH) or putting a face to an irc nickname or email (albfan, never expected you to be so tall!) and of course catching up with old friends because being able to continue talking with someone like if it was yesterday when in fact it was a year, is priceless.

  • Multiline message input in Fractal

    Fractal is a Matrix client for GNOME and is written in Rust. Matrix is an open network for secure, decentralized communication.

    This week, I’ve been working on the introduction of a multiline message input. Previously, there was the area where the user wrote their messages is a GtkEntry so there could be only one line on it. The user could insert a new line Unicode character with a keyboard shortcut but it wasn’t practical at all. And it was not represented in the GtkEntry. Here is the link to the initial issue.

    We first thought about using a GtkTextView instead of the GtkEntry but some people proposed to use a GtkSourceView (it’s also a GtkTextView anyway) in order to have syntax highlight when writing messages with Markdown.

Cinnamon 4.0 Will Tackle Screen Tearing on Linux Mint

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Linux Mint plans to make more performance improvements to the Cinnamon desktop ahead of its next release.

Similar work featured as part of Cinnamon 3.8, released as part of Linux Mint 19, and improved the responsiveness of launching apps on the desktop.

For the next major release of the Cinnamon desktop environment, the team want to tackle another performance-related bugbear: screen tearing.

“On modern NVIDIA GPUs we’re able to get rid of screen tearing by using “Force Composition Pipeline” in NVIDIA-Settings. With Vsync disabled in Cinnamon we then enjoy a faster desktop environments with no screen tearing,“, writes Cinnamon’s lead developer Clement Lefebvre in a recent blog post.

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A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

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GNOME

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons.

GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines.

The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop.

Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design.

With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better.

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KDE and GNOME: KDE 18.08, Usability & Productivity and More

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KDE
GNOME
  • KDE Team Announces Major Improvements in Upcoming KDE 18.08 Release

    The developers of Linux’s KDE suite have announced a major slew of updates set to be included in the upcoming KDE 18.08, set for an August 2018 release. Details for these updates revolve around a range of new features and overall polish for the core KDE apps including Gwenview, Spectacle, Konsole, and Dolphin, as well as focusing on the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.14 update due in October.

    Due to KDE’s open-source nature, the devs also have a site up for people interested in getting involved, whether its simple bug reporting or actually being hands-on with the development using C++, Qt, and CMake. You can read more about their community program at KDE – Get Involved.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 28

    Here’s another big week for KDE’s Usability and Productivity initiative. We’re getting ready for the release of KDE Applications 18.08–the second of our three yearly Applications releases. As the numbers in the version suggest, it will be released in August of 2018, about a month from now. As such, there’s been a lot of focus on new features and polish for core KDE apps such as Dolphin, Gwenview, Konsole, and Spectacle. We’re also ramping up our work for KDE Plasma 5.14, which is scheduled for release in October.

  • I’ve built a box

    This is not the typical post I use to write (which is usually about what I do at work, often related to GNOME, so if you’re not interested, just skip it…). But a couple of months ago I did something different that I still want to write about. That thing was a wooden box (sorry if you were expecting a Gavin Box) that I was asked to carve by my brother for his wedding, to be used for carrying the wedding rings.

    The wedding had a Game of Thrones’s theme (there was not blood in it though, if you’re wondering), so naturally my brother wanted some of that in the box. Thus, my initial idea was to just buy a box and carve something to do with GoT and include their names. Something like this, as my brother sent me for inspiration.

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: GUADEC18 Developer Center BoF Part 3: Challenges

    Currently, the Developer Center infrastructure and documentation suffers from low to non-existing maintenance. It’s a sign we need to take serious. Do we need lower the barrier to contributing to the developer documentation? What can we do to make the infrastructure easier to maintain? The underlying issue here likely also ties into why we now see new GNOME documentation hosted on other websites by different maintainers powered by different underlying technologies. I think this challenge needs both thinking from a technical point of view (how we might support editing multi-language documentation and auto-generated documentation) and an organizational point of view (assigning maintainership, reviewing our docs, aligning visions).

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment to Enter Beta on August 1, GNOME 3.29.4 Is Out

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GNOME

With a two-day delay, the GNOME Project through Javier Jardón announced today the release of the fourth and last development snapshot of the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment before it enters beta testing next month, GNOME 3.29.4, which continues to add improvements to various of GNOME's core components and applications.

However, due to the summer vacation and the GUADEC conference, GNOME 3.29.4 isn't a major snapshot as many would have expected. It only adds some minor changes and bug fixes to a handful of components, including GNOME Shell, Mutter, Evolution, GNOME Photos, GNOME Builder, GNOME Online Accounts, Polari, Bijiben, Evince, Epiphany, Baobab, GNOME Control Center, and File Roller.

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Also: GNOME 3.29.4 Released As Another Step Towards GNOME 3.30

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed, Akademy, Cutelyst and GUADEC

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KDE
GNOME
  • Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed in Linux ( Pro ) Magazine

    Kubuntu Linux has been my preferred Linux distribution for more than 10 years. My attraction to the KDE desktop and associated application set, has drawn from Kubuntu user, to a tester, teacher, developer, community manager and councilor. I feel really privileged to be part of, what can only be described as, a remarkable example of the free software, and community development of an exceptional product.

    This latest release 18.04, effectively the April 2018 release, is a major milestone. It is the first LTS Long Term Support release of Kubuntu running the “Plasma 5” desktop.
    The improvements are so considerable, in both performance and modern user interface ( UI ) design, that I was really excited about wanting to tell the world about it.

  • Going to Akademy

    Happy to participate in a tradition I’ve admired from afar but never been able to do myself… until this year. My tickets are bought, my passport is issued, and I’m going to Akademy! Hope to see you all there!

  • System76's New Manufacturing Facility, Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Google Cloud Platform Marketplace, Stranded Deep Now Available for Linux and Cutelyst New Release

    Cutelyst, a C++ web framework based on Qt, has a new release. The update includes several bug fixes and some build issues with buildroot. See Dantti's Blog for all the details. Cutelyst is available on GitHub.

  • GUADEC 2018 Videos: Help Wanted

    At this year’s GUADEC in Almería we had a team of volunteers recording the talks in the second room. This was organized very last minute as initially the University were going to do this, but thanks to various efforts (thanks in particular to Adrien Plazas and Bin Li) we managed to record nearly all the talks. There were some issues with sound on both the Friday and Saturday, which Britt Yazel has done his best to overcome using science, and we are now ready to edit and upload the 19 talks that took place in the 2nd room.

    To bring you the videos from last year we had a team of 5 volunteers from the local team who spent our whole weekend in the Codethink offices. (Although none of us had much prior video editing experience so the morning of the first day was largely spent trying out different video editors to see which had the features we needed and could run without crashing too often… and the afternoon was mostly figuring out how transitions worked in Kdenlive).

  • GUADEC 2018

    This year I attended my second GUADEC in beautiful Almería, Spain. As with the last one I had the opportunity to meet many new people from the extended GNOME community which is always great and I can’t recommend it enough for anybody involved in the project.

    [...]

    Flatpak continues to have a lot of healthy discussions at these events. @matthiasclasen made a post summarizing the BoF so check that out for the discussions of the soon landing 1.0 release.

    So lets start with the Freedesktop 18.07 (date based versioning now!) runtime which is in a much better place than 1.6 and will be solving lots of problems such as multi-arch support and just long term maintainability. I was really pleased to see all of the investment in BuildStream and the runtime from CodeThink which is really needed in the long term.

GNOME Shell & Mutter, Everybody’s Gone To The GUADEC

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GNOME
  • GNOME Shell & Mutter Updated Ahead Of GNOME 3.29.4

    GNOME 3.29.4 is coming out this week as the latest development release building up to GNOME 3.30 this September. GNOME Shell and Mutter have put out their latest releases for this development milestone.

    The Mutter 3.29.4 window/compositing manager has a crash fix as well as preserving paint volumes to optimize CPU use. That paint volume change for Mutter should be useful for further lowering the CPU usage but additional optimizations are on the way, particularly when Mutter is acting as a Wayland compositor.

  • Everybody’s Gone To The GUADEC

    It’s been ten days since I came back from GUADEC 2018, and I’ve finally caught up enough to find the time to write about it. As ever, it was a pleasure to see familiar faces from around the community, put some new faces to familiar names, and learn some entirely new names and faces!

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Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released

Elementary OS June beta 2 is now available to download. This second beta build of the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution touts a number of changes over the elementary OS june beta released back in July. Due to the shifting sands on which Juno is built the elementary team advise those planning on testing the release to do so by making a fresh install rather than doing an upgrade from beta 1 or (worse) an older version of elementary OS. Read more

today's howtos

Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together

Clinews – Read News And Latest Headlines From Commandline

A while ago, we have written about a CLI news client named InstantNews that helps you to read news and latest headlines from commandline instantly. Today, I stumbled upon a similar utility named Clinews which serves the same purpose – reading news and latest headlines from popular websites, blogs from Terminal. You don’t need to install GUI applications or mobile apps. You can read what’s happening in the world right from your Terminal. It is free, open source utility written using NodeJS. Read more