Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME

Cinnamon 3.8 Released

Filed under
GNOME
  • Cinnamon 3.8

    Cinnamon 3.8 is now officially out.

  • Cinnamon 3.8 Packages For Slackware Current
  • Cinnamon 3.8 Desktop Released With Performance Improvements, Various Modifications

    Ahead of the upcoming Linux Mint 19 release that's re-based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS as well as the upcoming Linux Mint Debian Edition 3 release based on Stretch, the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment is now officially available.

    This GNOME/GTK3-forked desktop environment has received a number of performance optimizations, support for Elogind, better support for GTK+ 3.22, client-side decorated windows, porting almost all Python components to Py3, backporting various changes from upstream GNOME, look-and-feel/UI/UX enhancements, and various updates to the many Cinnamon desktop applications.

GNOME: Fedora Atomic Workstation With GNOME and Future GNOME Plans

Filed under
GNOME
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Theming Possible

    To change themes, I need gnome-tweaks. I already had it installed from the gnome-nightly-apps repository. Unfortunately, it didn’t work, complaining about a missing python package in the runtime. Such is life with nightly builds.

  • Projects & release planning for GNOME

    I have been trying to improve our development experience by putting things together and create processes for our most common tasks taking advantage of the automation and features from GitLab and other technologies.

    Today I’m going to propose the workflow for project & release planning for individual projects and for GNOME as a whole in the least time-consuming, most automatic and simple way I could come up with.

    It’s my hope that this proposal will improve our contributor experience, reduce time spend on tracking issues, improve communication between teams such as design and engagement, increases exposure for PR, and finally, shorten the feedback & review cycle.

GNOME 3.28 in Fedora 28 and Flatpak's Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Changes to Files in GNOME 3.28

    Here are some changes in GNOME 3.28 users will see in the Fedora 28 release.

  • Flatpak Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Learns New Tricks

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has been updated recently to version 0.11.4, a maintenance update that introduces numerous important changes.

    With Flatpak 0.11.4, the development team updated the "flatpak build" command to allow it to always use multi-arch support, as well as to mount app extensions during the build process. In addition, the "flatpak build-init" command now supports adding of extension points earlier than build-finish by using the --extension argument, and build-finish now supports the --remove-extension argument.

    Updates were also made to the "flatpak uninstall" command, which can now pick the user or system automatically if they're not specified, the "flatpak run" command, which received several new options like --no-a11y-bus and --no-documents-portal. Also, users can now use "flatpak remove" (without quotes) as an alias for the "flatpak uninstall" command.

GIMP 2.10.0 Coverage

Filed under
GNU
GNOME
  • GIMP 2.10.0 Has Been Released with HIDPI Display support and New Dark Theme

    GIMP is a free and open source software for creating and editing image content. The development team has just announced the new stable release GIMP 2.10.0. It’s been almost six years of heavy development since the earlier stable release GIMP 2.8.x back in 2012. So, let’s check what’s new in GIMP 2.10.0.

  • After 6 Years, GIMP 2.10 is Here With Ravishing New Looks and Tons of New Features

    Free and open source image editing application GIMP has a new major release today. GIMP 2.10 comes six years after the last major release 2.8.

    It won’t be an exaggeration if I say that GIMP is the most popular image editor in Linux world and perhaps the best Adobe Photoshop alternative. The project was first started in 1996 and in the last 22 years, it has become the default image editor on almost all major Linux distributions. It is also available on Windows and macOS.

KDE's Kdenlive Sprint and GNOME's GUADEC Needs Talks

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kdenlive sprint news #1

    Part of the Kdenlive team is currently meeting in Paris at the La cité des sciences e de l’industrie to improve the project. We’ve tackled several goals, starting with being together. The magic of this kind of project leads to situations where we work together without meeting each other. Thus, we were able to live, share and especially spend good times to work together in a good mood. It was also useful for making important decisions after rich and lively discussions, exchanging varied points of view related to our respective experiences. Expect big changes very soon. Do you want to know more? Come join us at our new Telegram group!

  • Submit your talk for GUADEC!

    GUADEC 2018 is taking place in Almerîa, Spain this year and now is the time to submit your proposals! The submission deadline for talk submissions is tomorrow, on the 29th April.

Software/KDE/GNOME: Atelier/AtCore, Pitivi, Unite Extension, and GNOME at FOSS North

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Atelier/AtCore First Brainstorm

    I’m here today to invite you to participate in Atelier/AtCore first Brainstorm. But why are we going to do a brainstorm in the first place?

    Since July/2016 we’ve been working on AtCore, adding features and tools to help us on development. On 20th of January of 2018, we did our first tagging of the project and launched AtCore 1.0. Since then, more than 100 commits were already added to AtCore, including new features.

  • Dropping support for non-square pixels in Pitivi

    GStreamer Editing Services (GES), the library used by Pitivi for video processing, is very flexible and allows using videos of any video format in the same project. However, normally, in a “pro” setup, most video editing applications are very strict about the formats they accept as input, so Pitivi and GES were a bit unconventional with the “anything goes” approach.

  • Make Gnome Shell More Like Unity With Unite Extension

    Users coming to Ubuntu 18.04 from 16.04 with Unity might find it easier to switch (or at least feel more "at home") to Gnome Shell with the use of an extension called Unite.

  • GNOME at FOSS North

    FOSS North is a nordic free software conference happening annually in Gothenburg, Sweden. I have attended most of them since it started. It is no more than a ferry ride away from me and I also enjoy the conference size. Bastien and Kat coordinated that the event box was sent to my address in good time. Additionally, Nuritzi and Carlos sent additional GNOME stickers which I packed down along with some 20 pairs of GNOME Socks in various sizes.

Flatpak inception

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

One interesting usecase of flatpak is as a compliment to the ideas of Fedora Atomic Workstation and similar projects. In other words, a read-only core image for the base operating system, and then using various types of containers and sandboxes for the applications on top of that.

One problem in such a setup is doing development, in that the basic core rarely contains development tools. This is helped a bit by flatpak using runtimes and SDKs, because the compiler used during the build is not from the host. However, flatpaks are typically build using flatpak-builder, which still has some dependencies on the host, such as git/bzr/svn and strip. These pull in a lot of packages that you don’t want on a minimal core OS image.

Read more

Google Just Forked a Popular GTK Theme

Filed under
GNU
Google
GNOME

Rumour is that desktop Linux apps are coming to Chromebooks, and when they do they may look rather familiar.

Like, Adapta GTK theme familiar.

Reports earlier in the year revealed plans Google has to add Linux virtual machine support in Chrome OS via LXD containers.

We speculated at the time that the move could allow end-users to run desktop Linux apps on Chromebooks without resorting to existing Crouton-based hybrid-OS solutions.

Read more

GNOME Development and Events

Filed under
GNOME
  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0

    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work.

    However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.

  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar

    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.

  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await

    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.

  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)

    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!

  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid

    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.

  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros

    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30.

    Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes:

    - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

10 Great Linux GTK Themes For 2018

Filed under
GNOME

Customization is a big part of the Linux experience, and your desktop theme is no exception. The world of Linux desktop themes is an ever-evolving one, with new ones replacing old favorites all the time. Of course, the desktop environments and GTK itself are always changing, so that adds another dynamic element to consider. That said, some of the best desktop customization happens on the simplest desktop environments, like XFCE.

As of now, in early 2018, there are some really excellent GTK themes available. These themes aren’t ranked in any particular order. That comes down to a matter or preference. Any one of them can add a whole new look to your GTK-based desktop.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Openwashing

Review: Peppermint OS 9

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either. Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed. Read more

A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons. GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines. The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop. Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design. With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better. Read more

Linux 4.17.9, 4.14.57, 4.9.114, 4.4.143, and 3.18.116