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GNOME

GNOME: Random Wallpaper GNOME Extension, GTK3 Interface to libratbag/ratbagd

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GNOME
  • Random Wallpaper GNOME Extension

    A week or so ago we mentioned a neat Bing Wallpaper changer extension for GNOME — and boy did you make it known that Bing isn’t your preferred source of desktop wallpapers!

    And so we’re back for another stab at satisfying your want for fuss-free, auto-changing desktop backgrounds — and we’ve found a doozy.

  • GSoC part 11: all large features are done!

    From the much too abstract list of features in the beginning of this post, the only items that aren’t linked to are the welcome and error screens. No, I didn’t forget about those; I just saved those for last. To me, it was the least essential feature as owning more than one device, let alone using them simultaneously, is a niche case. As it turns out, however, the changes I made while implementing these screens also pave the way for eventual keyboard support. Let me explain!

    The welcome and error screen both provide a different "view" into the same application window. If we add the configuration screen, that gives three such different views. To allow for these different views, I added the concept of a "perspective", which I define as a certain view into Piper.

  • Libratbag's Piper Mouse GUI Interface Had A Successful GSoC

    While this year's Google Summer of Code isn't done for a few more weeks, the Piper mouse control user-interface for libratbag has now seen all of its major features completed.

    Piper is designed to be a universal interface for easily configuring gaming mice on Linux with a GTK3 interface to libratbag/ratbagd. GSoC student developer Jente Hidskes has been working on the project this summer and this week announced he completed all of his key planned features.

Reports From GUADEC in Manchester

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GNOME
  • GUADEC + Unconferences | 2017

    This year’s GUADEC was amazing. I’m really happy I could attent it this year (even though my tasks are accumulating and I’m really afraid to look at my emails again…). I’m still in Manchester so, if anyone wants to meet me and buy me a tea, do get in touch!

  • Back from GUADEC

    After spending a few days in Manchester with other fellow GNOME hackers and colleagues from Endless, I’m finally back at my place in the sunny land of Surrey (England) and I thought it would be nice to write some sort of recap, so here it is:

6 reasons why GNOME is still the best Linux desktop environment

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Linux
GNOME

I've been using Linux for about 15 years now, trying multiple desktop environments along the way. For the majority of my career, I was a diehard KDE Plasma user (starting with version 2.x). I stuck with Plasma for the majority of the 4.x series, eventually moving on due to stability issues. I've tried Xfce, MATE, Openbox, and many others, but ever since I switched to GNOME 3, I've never looked back. It's a responsive and stable environment that allows me to focus on my work with minimal distractions.

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GNOME and KDE: Recipes, GUADEC, and Latte dock

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KDE
GNOME
  • Recipes turns one year old

    I’ve given a presentation today and explained that recipes turns one year old at this GUADEC in Manchester. That is of course nothing compared to GNOME, which turned 20, so we send our congratulations:

  • My talk at GUADEC 2017

    Thanks so much to the GNOME Foundation for its support to the events I do to spread the GNOME word in my local community in Peru. I have had the opportunity to share my work done in 2016 and 2017 at GUADEC 2017.

  • [Video] Latte dock - different layouts per activities

GNOME/GTK: Nautilus, Evince, GNOME Calendar, GNOME Photos, Libratbag

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GNOME
  • Nautilus Not Adding Tags, Might Add File Favoriting Instead

    Tags are a super handy way to organize, sort and find files without needing to worry about where you actually put ’em. So, naturally, I was super excited when GNOME developer Alexandru Pandelea began to share word of work he’d done to bring native file tags to Nautilus.

  • After 12 Years, GNOME's Evince Document Viewer Supports Adobe Illustrator Files

    GNOME developer Bastien Nocera reports today on some the improvements coming to the Evince document viewer app as part of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    The biggest change that'll be implemented in Evince 3.26 is the use of the libarchive library for decompressing various archive types, including the CBZ, CB7, and CBT formats that are usually used for comic books, and it also supports RAR files through the use of the unarr command-line utility.

  • GNOME Calendar is now capable of creating/editing recurring events

    I’m glad to announce that GNOME Calendar now supports creation of recurring events. Now you can easily create recurring events with the help of the modified edit-dialog.

  • Enhancing photos with GNOME Photos

    Photos can do more than edit. It also integrates with GNOME Online Accounts, and can be set up to share photos to various online photo services. Photos also lets you organize your photos into albums. It even detects screenshots and automatically sorts them into a Screenshots album for you!

  • Libratbag-Powered Piper Is Looking Good For Configuring Gaming Mice On Linux

    It's not quite ready for primetime yet by Linux gamers, but Piper as the GTK-powered user-interface for controlling gaming mice on Linux is getting into shape.

    Piper is the GTK interface for configuring mice on Linux via libratbag/ratbagd, the library offering a generic way to access various mice features and abstract away hardware/kernel differences.

GNOME's Disks Utility Is Getting Large File Support, Resize and Repair Functions

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GNOME

GNOME's Disks utility (gnome-disk-utility) is getting a lot of attention from its maintainers during the development cycle of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment, and it now looks like there will be new disk resize and repair functions, too.

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GNOME: Evince, GNOME Recipes, Gedit, and GUADEC 2017 in Manchester

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GNOME
  • Evince 3.26 Will Let You View Adobe Illustrator & CBR Files

    Evince, the default document viewer on Ubuntu, is adding support for more file formats. The next stable release, Evince 3.26, due in October, will allow you to view Adobe Illustrator files on Linux without needing to install any additional software. “But wait!”, I hear you cry, “Evince can already do that!”

  • GNOME Recipes 3.26 Cooks Up a Batch of Improvements

    GNOME's Mathias Clasen has dished up an update on GNOME Recipes, the desktop cookery app for Linux, bringing news of several improvements.

  • Wait, Gedit Text Editor is Unmaintained?!

    Gedit is the default text editor on Ubuntu and just about a bajillion other Linux distros — but it’s also unmaintained.

    Did you know that? I didn’t. Not until a reader mentioned it to me earlier today.

    And, sure enough, head over to Gedit page on the GNOME Wiki and you can see for yourself that the project is “no longer maintained” and is “looking for new maintainers”.

  • Going to GUADEC 2017

    This year I am also giving a presentation about the application story in Endless OS. Our infrastructure, our changes to GNOME Software, our heavy use of Flatpak, etc. Hopefully you’ll find it interesting.

GNOME: Nautilus, Recipes, Evince, and GUADEC

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GNOME
  • Tags in Nautilus

    As I mentioned in my last blog post, I spent the last weeks working on tags. Though, just to be clear from the beginning, general tags will probably not make it into the next versions of Nautilus. At the time I found out that this feature should not be included, I already had some of the work done, so I’ll explain below what I accomplished even if it’ll not be part of the next releases.

  • Summer recipes

    While this is a development release, I think it may be time to declare this version (1.6) stable. Therefore, I encourage you to try it out and let me know if something doesn’t work.

  • New Evince format support: Adobe Illustrator and CBR files

    I mentioned that we switched from using external tools for decompression to using libarchive. That's not the whole truth, as we switched to using libarchive for CBZ, CB7 and the infamous CBT, but used a copy/paste version of unarr to support RAR files, as libarchive support lacks some needed features.

  • I’m going to GUADEC

    The GUADEC is approaching and I’m happy to say that I will be there, again! Apart some issues with my laptop[1], everything is packed and ready for the trip. I plan to be in Manchester from tomorrow evening and will stay in there until Thursday next week. Just by looking at the schedule and planned social events, I’m sure that it is going to be an awesome week.

GNOME: GNOME Disks, GNOME Builder, and GNOME Games

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GNOME
  • GNOME Disks: Integrate Resize and Repair

    The basic prototype patches let GNOME Disks resize partitions and their filesystems, check filesystems and repair them – at least when built against UDisks master where the actual work is performed. It needs some fixes on how jobs and UI states correspond but here a glimpse on how the resize looks like.

  • GNOME Disks Gaining Resize & Repair Support
  • GSoC: GNOME Builder: Improving word completion

    A relatively short update about the project. I have implemented a new GtkSourceCompletionProvider to mimick user- requested word-completion feature in Vim.

  • Global Search for GNOME Builder

    In previous post, Indexing multiple languages source code in GNOME Builder, I wrote about how indexing of source code in a project is done in GNOME Builder. Now that we have index of all symbols in the project, this index is used to implement global search of symbols using which we can search fuzzily all symbols in the project.

  • GNOME Games: Touch Support

    Apologies for running a bit late. Had been brewing up some serious potions and not to mention my old nimbus 2000 can’t really live up to expectations now. Almost an antique.  well without a further due, let’s get into explaining you about the spells I’ve been working on.

GTK2/GTK3 Themes and Extension for GNOME

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GNOME
  • Oomox – Generate Color Variants of Numix GTK2/GTK3 Themes

    Oomox is a GUI tool with which you can generate several color variations of Numix (GTK2 / GTK3) themes, as well as Gnome-Colors and Archdroid icon themes. It ships with support for GNOME, Unity, Xfce4 and Openbox desktop environments, and a plethora of built-in presets which can be customized further.

    It is virtually the easiest way to create your own GTK 3.20 theme and thanks to one of the app’s users, Spatry, you can check out Oomox in action in the video below:

  • Get a New Desktop Wallpaper Each Day with this Extension for GNOME

    While Ubuntu’s switch to GNOME doesn’t render all of those methods redundant it does unlock some additional opportunities (like unified lock screen and desktop background) — something that the GNOME extensions framework dramatically simplifies.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.