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GNOME

Development: Gtk4, GNOME Foundation, Coda, AutoML, LLVM

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Development
GNOME
BSD
  • Modern Text Editor Design

    .

    Gtk4 development is heating up, and we are starting to see a toolkit built like a game engine. That’s pretty cool. But how will that change how we write editors? Should it?

    In the Gtk3 cycle, I added support to GtkTextView that would render using Alex’s GtkPixelCache. It helped us amortize the cost of rendering into mostly just an XCopyArea() when drawing a frame. It’s why we have that nice 60fps two-finger-scrolling.

  • Policy hacking

    The hackfest was part of an effort to redefine how the GNOME Foundation operates and is perceived.

    [...]

    Until now, the board has largely operated in an executive mode: each meeting we decide on funding requests, trademark questions and whatever other miscellaneous issues come our way. While some of this decision-making responsibility is to be expected, it is also fair to say that the board spends too much time on small questions and not enough on bigger ones.

  • Coda revival

    Coda is a distributed file system developed as a research project at Carnegie Mellon University, descended from a older version of the Andrew File System. It got dropped from FreeBSD some five years ago, due to not having been adopted for a MPSAFE world. The focus for this current project is to bring it back into sufficiently workable shape that it could return to the kernel. It is currently in a working condition. Work is underway to test it better, fix whatever issues are found, and commit it to 12-CURRENT.

  • Google's Learning Software Learns to Write Learning Software

    In a project called AutoML, Google’s researchers have taught machine-learning software to build machine-learning software. In some instances, what it comes up with is more powerful and efficient than the best systems the researchers themselves can design. Google says the system recently scored a record 82 percent at categorizing images by their content. On the harder task of marking the location of multiple objects in an image, an important task for augmented reality and autonomous robots, the auto-generated system scored 43 percent. The best human-built system scored 39 percent.

  • Intel Begins Working On "Knights Mill" Support For LLVM/Clang

    Intel compiler engineers have begun mainlining "Knights Mill" enablement within the LLVM compiler stack.

    Knights Mill is the codename for an upcoming Xeon Phi expected for release later this quarter. Details on Knights Mill are relatively light but it will cater to deep learning / AI use-cases and more efficient than Knights Landing (KNL).

    Intel has previously said Knights Mill is capable of twice the performance of Knights Landing for floating point operations per cycle and there are also new/optimized instructions for 8-bit and 16-bit arithmetic.

GNOME/GTK: GNOME 3.28, GTK+ 3, GNOME Photos, GNOME.Asia 2017 and Fractional Scaling

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.28 Expected To Ship On Pi Day

    The GNOME team has firmed up the release schedule for the in-development GNOME 3.28 desktop environment.

    GNOME 3.28.0 is expected to be released on 14 March 2018, which many in the tech/mathematics community celebrate each year as Pi day.

  • A scrolling primer

    A few years ago, I wrote a post about scrolling in GTK+ 3. Time for another look!

  • Stable GNOME Photos Flatpaks moved to Flathub
  • Going to GNOME.Asia 2017

    To be honest, I’m really exited about this trip. I’ve never been to ChongQing before.

  • How to Enable Fractional Scaling in Gnome

    Fractional scaling is practically necessary if you’re running a HiDPI display, and you want your desktop to scale uniformly to match your display. It’s always been an issue on Linux, but the latest version of the GNOME desktop has implemented a true fractional scaling feature to keep your desktop looking good.

    Even though GNOME 3.26 does have fractional scaling support, it wasn’t mature enough to make the release. As a result, it’s still a testing feature that you need to enable yourself.

Software, KDE, and GNOME

Filed under
KDE
Software
GNOME
  • D-Bus Broker Updated To Version 5

    Earlier this year was word of BUS1 working on a D-Bus Broker while announced in late August was this D-Bus Broker project as a high performance message bus.

  • 10 Free Linux Productivity Apps You Haven’t Heard Of

    Productivity apps can really make your work easier. If you are a Linux user, these 10 lesser-known free productivity apps for the Linux desktop can help you.. As a matter of fact, it’s possible keen Linux users have heard of all the apps on the list, but for somebody who hasn’t gone beyond the main apps, these should be unknown.

  • Krita 3.3.1
  • KDE Plasma 5.12 Pushing For "An Awesome Release On Wayland"

    While today's release of KDE Plasma 5.11 brings with it many Wayland improvements, KWin maintainer Martin Flöser (né Gräßlin) is proposing to get the Plasma 5.12 support into better shape on Wayland.

  • GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin

    Last weekend we held a GNOME Foundation hackfest in Berlin, as planned in August. That means not just a hackfest organised by the foundation, but to improve the foundation itself. Many of the topics we had to cover are interconnected and it’s a challenge to untangle it all and sort it out. Being in the same room, with a projector and a whiteboard, helped a lot. Many thanks to Kinvolk who let us use their

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment to Land March 14, 2018, Development Starts Soon

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GNOME

Now that the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment received its first point release and it already started landing in the repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions, it's time for the GNOME devs to concentrate their efforts on the next major release.

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GNOME and Budgie: 2 Comfy Ubuntu 17.10 Environments

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you are looking for a change-of-pace desktop that has a modern flare and very tiny learning curve, Ubuntu's integration of both GNOME 3 and Budgie easily can fit your needs. If you want to keep using the Ubuntu family desktop line, take the other Ubuntu flavors for a spin.

Or, consider checking out the GNOME and Budgie flavors as an alternative to your current Linux distro. Canonical is a solid developer that has pioneered many innovations.

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Microsoft is 'Ripping Off' Chromium, Google Chrome Improves GTK Support

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Google
Microsoft
GNOME

An Interview With Neil McGovern, GNOME Foundation Executive Director: “Software Freedom, Users, And Technical Excellence Are Our 3 Pillars”

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Interviews
GNOME

Earlier this year in February, the GNOME Foundation announced the appointment of Neil McGovern as its new Executive Director. He is a well-known figure in Free Software community; he served as Debian Project Leader from 2014-15. The GNOME Project, apart from developing GNOME desktop, also takes care of multiple other emerging projects.

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Also: Travel to Berlin

Software: GNU, GNOME, Synapse, and KDE's Amarok

Filed under
GNU
KDE
GNOME
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 Videos Posted

    Videos from the recent GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 are now available online where matters from the GCC compiler to glibc and compiler diagnostics were discussed.

    The GNU Tools Cauldron 2017 took place from 8 to 10 September in Prague. Videos from the event are now online while the slides are sadly not yet available, but are said to be coming soon

  • GNUHealth 3.2.4 patchset released

    GNU Health 3.2.4 patchset has been released !

  • First GNOME 3.26 Point Release Now Rolling Out

    The first point release update to GNOME 3.26 is pretty much out (save for an official announcement). The first of many such releases, GNOME 3.26.1 brings with it bug fixes, performance tuning, and a few other minor tweaks.

  • Synapse – A Semantic Launcher for Searching and Launching Apps and Files

    Synapse is a free and open source quick launcher application with which you can easily start applications and access files using the Zeitgeist engine – kinda reminiscent of Ulauncher and Gnome Pie.

  • KDE's Amarok Music Player Seeing A Possible KF5/Qt5 Port

    It has been several years since last seeing an update to the Amarok open-source music player, but it looks like it may be alive and ticking after all, at least with one developer working towards a KF5/Qt5 port.

    Amarok is among the many KDE/Qt aligned media players from Juk, Cantata, Babe, Elisa, and others, but Amarok really hasn't been updated in quite a while. A Phoronix reader pointed out that a developer is indeed working on a port to using KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt5 and posted some initial patches back in September.

GNOME: GNOME Shell 3.26.1, Mutter 3.26.1

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GNOME
  • GNOME Shell 3.26.1

    GNOME Shell provides core user interface functions for the GNOME 3 desktop, like switching to windows and launching applications. GNOME Shell takes advantage of the capabilities of modern graphics hardware and introduces innovative user interface concepts to provide a visually attractive and easy to use experience.

  • GNOME Shell 3.26.1 Fixes Headless Mode

    GNOME 3.26.1 is shaping up to be a decent point release as besides Mutter finally picking up the half-tiling mode improvements, GNOME Shell 3.26.1 also has its share of changes.

  • Improved half tiling available in Mutter 3.26.1

    A late night announcement: the improved tiling patches (shown in a previous blog post) were merged in Mutter and and GTK+3, and will be available in GNOME 3.26.1 / GTK 3.22.23 (not yet released; should be available this week).

    I’d like to thank Florian Muellner, Matthias Clasen, Jonas Adahl and AlexGS for all their support, time, code reviews and testing.

Fedora 27 Beta Linux distribution now available with GNOME 3.26

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Last week, Korora 26 was released. This is a Linux distribution based on Fedora 26, which was released back in July. That's the problem with using an operating system that is based on another operating system -- it can seem like you are never truly up to date. Case in point, today, Fedora 27 Beta sees release.

True, this is pre-release software, but recent Fedora Beta releases have been very stable, so it should be fine to run on a non-production machine. Just be aware that there can be bugs and the potential for data loss. If you are comfortable with using a beta operating system, you are in for quite the treat. Fans of Fedora can finally experience GNOME 3.26 -- the default desktop environment on version 27 of the distro. In addition, Fedora 27 Beta now supports TRIM on encrypted solid state disks.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox 58

  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features
    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.
  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations
    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.
  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool
    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0. The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.
  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows
    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.
  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on
    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.
  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues
    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design. While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons. Read more

Linux Foundation introduces the LF Networking Fund, harmonizes​ open source, open standards

The Linux Foundation is taking the first step to bring some commonality across its myriad network efforts by creating the LF Networking Fund (LFN). By creating a combined administrative structure, Linux Foundation said LFN will provide a platform for cross-project collaboration. LFN will form the foundation for collaboration across the network stack: the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation and testing. Read more

Openwashing Surveillance

  • Facebook Open Sources Detectron Object Detection
    The way big companies are open sourcing significant AI is both gratifying and slightly worrying. AI is the biggest revolution since we discovered fire and started making tools. FaceBook AI Research has added to the list of what is available by open sourcing its Detectron project.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection research
    Facebook's artificial intelligence research (FAIR) team today announced it would open-source its object detection platform Detectron, as well as the research the team has done on it.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection work: Watch out, Google CAPTCHA
    acebook has brought us one step closer to a Skynet future made a commitment to computer vision boffinry by open-sourcing its codebase for object detection, Detectron. Written in Python and powered by the Caffe2 deep learning framework, the codebase – which implements object-sniffing algos such as Mask R-CNN and RetinaNet – is available under the Apache 2.0 licence.