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GNOME

GNOME 3.30 Released

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GNOME

The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.30 contains six months of work by the GNOME community and includes many improvements and new features.

This release features some significant performance improvements. The entire desktop now uses fewer system resources, which means you can run more apps at once without encountering performance issues.

Other highlights include a new content reader mode in the Web application, search enhancements in the Files application, and improvements to screen recording and screen sharing. The Settings application now has a Thunderbolt panel to manage devices and dynamically shows hardware-related panels only when relevant hardware is detected.

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Also: GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

GNOME 3.30 released & coming to Fedora 29

GNOME 3.30 Ready For Release Today, Videos From GUADEC Conference Now Released

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GNOME

The Best New Features in GNOME 3.30

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GNOME

With GNOME 3.30 released later today we look at the best new features the GNOME 3.30 upgrade has to offer.

The 35th stable release of the free, open-source GNOME desktop environment, GNOME 3.30 arrives six months after GNOME 3.28 was released.

With an approximate 24,845 changes in all, GNOME 3.30 offers both major new features and smaller improvements that are well worth looking out for.

Available to download from today, and due to ship in Ubuntu 18.10 this October, GNOME 3.30 boasts new features, new apps, and new improvements, all of which are designed to help improve the way we use the desktop.

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Dash to Dock v64 Released with Support for GNOME 3.30

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GNOME

A new version of the popular Dash to Dock GNOME Shell extension has been released — but don’t get too excited.

Dash to Dock v64 is the first update to the icon-based task bar since April, but only sports a modest set of changes.

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GNOME: GUADEC 2018 Videos, GNOME 3.30 Coming, Natural Language Processing Software Survey

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GNOME
  • GUADEC 2018 Videos: All Done

    All the editing & uploading for the GUADEC videos is now finished. The videos were all uploaded to YouTube some time ago, and they are all now available on http://videos.guadec.org/2018 as well.

    Thanks to everyone who helped with the editing: Alexis Diavatis, Bin Li, Garrett LeSage, Alexandre Franke (who also did a lot of the work of uploading to YouTube), and Hubert Figuiere (who managed to edit so many that I’m suspicious he might be some kind of robot in disguise).

  • GNOME-Tweaks 3.30 Is Ready To Tweak The Latest GNOME Bits

    With GNOME 3.30 due to be released this week, GNOME-Tweaks 3.30 has been released as being ready to tweak this latest flagship open-source desktop environment.

  • Natural Language Processing

    I looked at a variety of open source tools for natural language processing. These provide good ways to tokenize a text and to identify the “part of speech” (noun, verb, adjective, adverb, etc.) but I didn’t yet find one that could analyze the types of clauses that are used. Which is a shame. My understanding of this is an area of English grammar is still quite weak and I was hoping my laptop might be able teach me by example but it seems not.

    [...]

    I found some surprisingly polished libraries that I’m keen to use for … something. One day I’ll know what. The compromise library for JavaScript can do all kinds of parsing and wordplay and is refreshingly honest about its limitations, and spaCy for Python also looks exciting. People like to interact with a computer through text. We hide the UNIX commandline. But one of the most popular user interfaces in the world is the Google search engine, which is a text box that accepts any kind of natural language and gives the impression of understanding it. In many cases this works brilliantly — I check spellings and convert measurements all the time using this “search engine” interface. Did you realize GNOME Shell can also do unit conversions? Try typing “50lb in kg” into the GNOME Shell search box and look at the result. Very useful! More apps should do helpful things like this.

Taming Gnome 3 - theming and scheming

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GNOME

As time goes by, the Gnome 3 desktop is becoming more and more restrictive in what it allows its users to do, fundamentally mistaking visual and functional minimalism, further complicating things by using a pseudo-touch interface that makes little sense on the desktop. Shame, because it doesn't make much to have Gnome look and behave the part. I've written a whole bunch of guides explaining how you can regain some of the functionality (and sanity) back, and it's time for another such article.

First, please read the basics as I've outlined many months ago. Now, we will explore additional themes and options, additional extensions, and some other settings. Not all of this will bear fruit, but it's an exercise that should ultimately give you the right pointers to using Gnome 3 effectively. Let's roll.

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GNOME and KDE: GNOME Keysign, Developer Center Initiative, gnome-class and Akademy

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KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME Keysign 0.9.9

    We have a new Keysign release with support for exchanging keys via the Internet.

    I am very proud to announce this version of GNOME Keysign, because it marks an important step towards a famous “1.0”. In fact, it might be just that. But given the potentially complicated new dependencies, I thought it’d be nice to make sort of an rc release.

  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 23rd August

    On Thursday the 23rd August we held another Developer Center meeting. Unfortunately due to unforeseen circumstances I was late to this meeting, but I will try my best to report on the events.

    We are on the verdict of making a technological decision and we have two proposals which currently is in debate, namely HotDoc and Vuepress (for now, Michael has expressed that he is currently unsure if he is able to commit the necessary time to work on the Django instance). This meeting we listed and agreed on a set of criteria, weighted after importance. These criteria has root in the list of challenges which was covered in a previous blog post. The purpose of having a list of criteria is to reach consensus on how to prioritize features in the proposed instances when we judge them.

    The next section will describe a few highlighted criteria that we weighted. You can find a full list of criteria here. Any input is welcome on the Gitlab thread.

  • GIR support in gnome-class

    Recently I've been working again in the rust port of libgepub, libgepub is C code, but in the rust-migration branch almost all the real functionality is done with rust and the GepubDoc class is a GObject wrapper around that code.

    For this reason I was thinking about to use gnome-class to implement GepubDoc.

    Gnome-class is a rust lib to write GObject code in rust that's compatible with the C binary API so then you can call this new GObject code written with gnome-class from C. I've worked a little in gnome-class, implementing a basic properties support.

  • My first Akademy

    I am glad I got a chance to attend this year’s Akademy.  I wanted to understand how open-source orgs like KDE work and Akademy did help me understand it to some extent.

    There was a lot of excitement when I started my trip but the long flight and the heat wave had sucked all the energy out of me. Anyway,  a  good night’s sleep and the pleasant weather during the pre-registration event got my excitement back again.

GNOME and KDE: GNOME 3.29.92 Released, More on KaOS 2018.08, and KDE Itinerary

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KDE
GNOME
  • GNOME 2.30rc2 (2.29.92) RELEASED

    The second release candidate for 3.30 is here! Remember this is the
    end of this development cycle, enjoy it as fast as you can, the final
    release is scheduled next Wednesday!

  • GNOME 3.29.92 Released As The Final Step Before Next Week's GNOME 3.30 Desktop

    Friday night marked the release of GNOME 3.29.92 that serves as the second and final release candidate ahead of next week's GNOME 3.30 six-month desktop update.

    This release is the final chance to test out the new GNOME packages ahead of the official release next Wednesday. Given the feature freeze has been in effect, the work isn't all that exciting for RC2 but mostly bug fixing. But on the infrastructure side they have added i386 and ARMv7 jobs to their GNOME-Build-Meta repo and also merged the branch to now begin building GNOME Flatpak runtimes directly with GNOME-Build-Meta.

  • KaOS 2018.08 Released As One Of The Great KDE Linux Distributions

    KaOS 2018.08 has been released as the newest stable ISO spin of this built-from-scratch, Arch-inspired Linux distribution that offers a first-rate KDE Plasma desktop experience.

  • KDE Itinerary - Data Extraction

    After the overview of KDE’s travel assistant components we are going to look at one part in particular here, the booking data extraction. The convenience and usefulness of the overall system depends on being fed with accurate and complete data of when and where you are going to travel, ideally fully automatically.

    The data we are interested in is essentially everything you’d want to see on a unified itinerary for a trip. Flight and hotel bookings probably come to mind first, but there’s also event tickets, restaurant reservations, rental cars bookings, bus tickets, etc.

    The primary source of that information is, like for the commercial alternatives, incoming email. However we want to run this locally, under the user’s control, so the entry point for us is the email client. My email client is KMail, so that’s what we have a plug-in for, but there is nothing in the KItinerary library that’s specific to that (or Akonadi), integration with other email clients is very much possible.

Gnome 3 & best extensions

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GNOME

There you go. Writing this article got me thinking. Gnome 3 is like Firefox 57. It brought about a radical change, made a lot of what made the original version great redundant, and hid options from users, making customization difficult. Gnome 3 also fights hard against extensions. But these are the bread and butter of what makes it useful, practical and appealing to users. The same is also true of Cinnamon, which has also partially been afflicted the same way. Technically, one may claim that extensions are a poor excuse for bad design, but then, in general, history has shown that they do make products more engaging in the long run. Collective intelligence can be a good thing, especially when harvested for free.

I am still convinced that Gnome 3 is doing it wrong, and that Plasma, Unity or even MATE are much better solutions on all levels. But then, if you do want to use this desktop environment, there are several handy extensions that can truly transform the experience. The must-have set, and then a sweetening of five nice little extras, which help make the desktop more useful and fun. If you have any other suggestions, this is a good time to use your email sending skills. And we're done.

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KDE and GNOME: Akademy, KDevelop and GNOME-Usage

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KDE
GNOME
  • My experience in Akademy.

    And there I was: Flying the longest flight I’ve ever flown. The journey had started two years ago, when I joined Nitrux. I was a very excited about it! After lots of lines of code (and days, too), I was traveling to Guatemala City, expectant about how would Akademy was going to be like. After landing on Alajuela, again on Madrid, and finally on Vienna, I found myself amazed. I was there! I was there!

    Akademy started for me on august 14, because of a delay on my flight. That day I assisted to the Maui Project BoF, which was lead by my friend Camilo, and to the Kirigami BoF. Both of them were great, as I met awesome people in there and I learnt a bunch of interesting things about Kirigami. After that, I walked by the streets of Vienna with my good friend Uri.

  • Improve your C++ code in KDevelop with Clang-Tidy

    You might be aware of Clang-Tidy, the clang-based C++ “linter” tool which allows static analysis of your code, including fixing it automatically where possible.
    And you remember the introduction of the “Analyzer run mode” with version 5.1 of KDevelop, the extensible cross-platform IDE for C, C++, Python, PHP and other languages.

    [...]

    Learn more about the kdev-clang-tidy plugin from its README.md file, e.g. how to build it, how to package it, how to use it, where to report issues, and what the planned roadmap is.

    The latest released kdev-clang-tidy version is currently also included in the Nightly AppImage builds of the current stable KDevelop code version (which already switched to the 5.3 branch).

  • Work Started This Summer On Adding System Power Information To GNOME-Usage

    GNOME's Usage application that allows visualizing processor, memory, disk, and network usage may soon be able to report your system's power consumption data.

    Student developer Aditya Manglik spent the summer participating in Google Summer of Code 2018 where he had been working on implementing a power panel within the GNOME-Usage program. The goal was to provide power metrics backed by UPower for being able to report per-application power usage (percentage), hardware devices consuming the most power, and displaying this all nicely inside gnome-usage.

    The concept is akin to Intel's PowerTop but for nicely displaying all available system power consumption data -- based upon what's supported by the system hardware, etc -- via the GNOME-Usage utility.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How Software Is Helping Big Companies Dominate
    Antitrust deserves the attention it’s getting, and the tech platforms raise important questions. But the rise of big companies — and the resulting concentration of industries, profits, and wages — goes well beyond tech firms and is about far more than antitrust policy. In fact, research suggests that big firms are dominating through their use of software. In 2011, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen declared that “software is eating the world.” Its appetizer seems to have been smaller companies. [...] This model, where proprietary software pairs with other strengths to form competitive advantage, is only becoming more common. Years ago, one of us (James) started a company that sold publishing software. The business model was to write the software and then sell licenses to publishers. That model still exists, including in online publishing where companies like Automattic, maker of the open source content management system WordPress, sell hosting and related services to publishers. One-off licenses have given way to monthly software-as-a-service subscriptions, but this model still fits with Carr’s original thesis: software companies make technology that other companies pay for, but from which they seldom derive unique advantage. That’s not how Vox Media does it. Vox is a digital publishing company known, in part, for its proprietary content management system. Vox does license its software to some other companies (so far, mostly non-competitors), but it is itself a publisher. Its primary business model is to create content and sell ads. It pairs proprietary publishing software with quality editorial to create competitive advantage. Venture capitalist Chris Dixon has called this approach the “full-stack startup.” “The old approach startups took was to sell or license their new technology to incumbents,” says Dixon. “The new, ‘full stack’ approach is to build a complete, end-to-end product or service that bypasses incumbents and other competitors.” Vox is one example of the full-stack model. The switch from the software vendor model to the full-stack model is seen in government statistics. Since 1998, the share of firm spending on software that goes to pre-packaged software (the vendor model) has been declining. Over 70% of the firms’ software budgets goes to code developed in-house or under custom contracts. And the amount they spend on proprietary software is huge — $250 billion in 2016, nearly as much as they invested in physical capital net of depreciation.
  • Metsä Wood - Open Source Wood Winner: ClipHut Structural Building System
  • Shutting the open sauce bottle
    While open source software has revolutionised the enterprise software world, a few people are starting to wonder if its very nature will survive the age of the cloud. The concept that software can be used by pretty much anyone for pretty much anything is causing its developers big problems in the era of distributed cloud computing services. Two open-source software companies have decided to alter the licences under which some of their software is distributed, with the expressed intent of making it harder -- or impossible -- for cloud computing providers to offer a service based around that software.
  • How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
    How many gigabytes of data did we (the people of Earth) create yesterday? ...brain. is. thinking... More than 2.5 billion! And it's growing. Yes, it's hard for us to wrap our human brains around it. So, the question the Command Line Heros podcast deals with this week is: How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
  • Security updates for Tuesday

Linux Leftovers

  • Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters [Ed: Mac Asay does't know what an operating system is. This is what happens when people with a law degree write about technology. And he trolls Linux for clicks.]
  • Clear Linux Making Progress With Encrypted Installations
    One of the features I've personally been looking forward to is the official support for encrypted installations with Clear Linux. While many don't view it as a particular desktop distribution, it does have all of the packages I personally need for my main production system. So I've been wanting to see how well it could work out as my main desktop OS and to chronicle that experience. Having official support for encrypted installations has been one of the last blockers for my requirements. You can currently setup Clear on an encrypted installation manually, but for simplicity and wanting to keep to the "official" installation routes, I've been waiting for them to officially support encrypted installs... Especially in this day and age, anyone installing a desktop Linux distribution particularly on a mobile/laptop/ultrabook should really be doing a full-disk encryption.
  • The Linux Throwie: A Non-Spacefaring Satellite
    Throwies occupy a special place in hardware culture — a coin cell battery, LED, and a magnet that can be thrown into an inaccessible place and stick there as a little beacon of colored light. Many of us will fondly remember this as a first project. Alas, time marches inevitably on, and launching cheerful lights no longer teaches me new skills. With a nod to those simpler times, I’ve been working on the unusual idea of building a fully functional server that can be left in remote places and remain functional, like a throwie (please don’t actually throw it). It’s a little kooky, yet should still deliver a few years of occasional remote access if you leave it somewhere with sunlight.
  • OnePlus To Launch 5G Phone In 2019; $100 Costlier Than OnePlus 6T
  • OnePlus Releases OxygenOS Open Beta 7, OnePlus Roaming Launched
    Chinese company OnePlus has released the new OxygenOS Open Beta 7 for its OnePlus 6 smartphone, which has introduced several updates and features.

OSS: Development and Conferences

  • Give your students edit access to their course syllabus
    I wanted to give students more agency in their learning. So I let them make pull requests against the syllabus. [...] This exercise was a learning experience for both my students and me, as we clearly had different visions of what constituted a "disruption." While we all agreed that students should pay attention to the instructor and engage in all classroom activities, students thought they should be able to take "important" calls during class time and that texting during class was acceptable. I thought that cell phones should be turned off entirely during class. Students also thought that leaving the classroom to get a drink without asking permission was acceptable, while I thought that they should handle thirst needs before or after class. This resulted in a discussion about professionalism and the expectations associated with college-level work. We discussed what constituted a distraction and agreed that making sounds, whispering, and talking in class all counted as distractions. This in turn led to a discussion of the impacts distractions can have on a learning environment and the importance of paying attention in class. We also explored the impact various learning technologies can have on a classroom—for example, the tools students with disabilities require to fully participate in class, such as a screen reader—and agreed that noise generated by these was acceptable under the policy we intended to construct.
  • Open source tools to consider for your RESTful APIs
    At the start of a RESTful API development project, a software team might be tempted to buy an expensive commercial API management tool when an open source tool can just as easily do the trick. In fact, there are plenty of open source tools that can help with each stage of the API lifecycle and help get an API development program off the ground at low cost.
  • London Perl Workshop

    As london.pm celebrates its 20th anniversary, join Katherine Spice in conversation with a panel of the group's former leaders.

  • GNOME at Capitole du Libre 2018
    Last Saturday and Sunday I went to the Capitole du Libre 2018 to animate the GNOME booth and help on the Purism one.
  • Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC19
    For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

Red Hat/IBM: OpenShift and Ansible, RHEL Updates