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GNOME

GNOME Devs to Remove the Ability to Launch Apps from the Nautilus File Manager

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GNOME

Launched in mid-March 2018, GNOME 3.28 is the most advanced and also the first release of the widely-used desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems to drop support for desktop icons from the Nautilus file manager, which handled them for the past two decades, planning to move the functionality to GNOME Shell.

Last month, the GNOME Project kicked off the next six-month development cycle, for GNOME 3.30, which will see the light of day in September 2018 with a more sandboxed system where you won't be able to launch binaries/executables, nor programs directly from the Nautilus file manager.

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GSoC and GNOME

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Google
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018 with GNOME: Internationalization of Fractal (part 1)

    It is the beginning of the coding period and I will first work on investigating on implementing the internationalization of Fractal and then find a way to do it. At this moment, internationalization support in Rust is limited and new, so no GTK application written in Rust have implemented it yet. And it is very exciting to work on this with this perspective, furthermore because I will write some blogposts that will try to explain how to do it and I hope it could help other people to do so!

  • Implementation of the PartialEq trait for Message
  • Improving the development experience for GNOME Settings

    After Bastien and Rui announced that they were stepping down from maintainership of GNOME Settings, I went ahead and volunteered to take care of it. This was not a random act, though; for quite some time, I’ve been adding and changing code all around. I was pretty involved in moving to the new layout, and with the help of other contributors, implemented the redesigns of various panels. Clearly, I have a technical debt to the app.

    Adding to that, assuming maintainership over it also aligns well with the goals of my employer, Endless, and gives a nice upstream/downstream overlap. With that, I can spend a bigger chunk of my work time on upstream tasks. Moreover, it allows us to have a stronger relationship with the GNOME community — after all, it allows me to bridge the insights and knowledge we gain from our users to a wider community.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 at GNOME

    Hi! I am Aditya Manglik from Wien, a.k.a. carpediem on IRC. Currently I am pursuing a Bachelor’s thesis in Deep Learning from TU Wien. I am interested in software, operating systems and AI. Travel, hiking and football occupy rest of the time.

    I started with Linux ~7 years ago when my Windows desktop failed to boot because of a curious experiment accident with system32 files. Looking back at that moment, I am glad for the few hours of initial pain which was worth several years of sanity. Since then I have been working with Linux as the primary platform. I like Open Source Software because it’s much more fun to break and fix something, which really helps understand what’s happening in the machine. I used to like C/ C++ quite a bit, but you can probably throw any language and I am happy to learn it.

GNOME: Reducing the number of image copies in GNOME, Nautilus Changes, and Window Corner Preview Extension

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GNOME
  • Reducing the number of image copies in GNOM

    In the context of GIMP/GNOME, the only thing that knew how to draw RGB images to X11 windows (doing palette mapping for 256-color graphics cards and dithering if necessary) was the GIMP. Later, when GTK+ was written, it exported a GtkPreview widget, which could take an RGB image buffer supplied by the application and render it to an X window — this was what GIMP plug-ins could use in their user interface to show, well, previews of what they were about to do with the user's images. Later we got some obscure magic in a GdkColorContext object, which helped allocate X11 colors for the X drawing primitives. In turn, GdkColorContext came from the port that Miguel and I did of XmHTML's color context object (and for those that remember, XmHTML became the first version of GtkHtml; later it was rewritten as a port of KDE's HTML widget). Thankfully all that stuff is gone now; we can now assume that video cards are 24-bit RGB or better everywhere, and there is no need to worry about limited color palettes and color allocation.

  • Nautilus Will No Longer Launch Binaries Or Desktop Files

    Nautilus (or Files), the Gnome file manager, received a Git update which removes its ability to launch binaries or programs in general. That means you won't be able to double click binaries, scripts, or desktop files to run them - this includes the ask dialog which lets you choose if the file should be launched or displayed.

    A quite big consequence of this change is that you won't be able to launch AppImage files from Nautilus any more, though I think AppImage files were not intentionally targeted by this change (I may be wrong). As a side note, this also affects applications or games distributed as self-extracting scripts.

  • Get A Floating Live Window Preview In Gnome With Window Corner Preview Extension

    I really like the Opera video pop out feature, but I wanted this for any window, and not just web videos, so I searched for a Gnome picture-in-picture alternative, and I came across Window Corner Preview, a Gnome extension which does just this in an intuitive way.

    Window Corner Preview shows a floating live video preview of a window in a screen corner. The extension can be useful in multiple situations, like watching a terminal window for some activity, keep an eye on a YouTube or Netflix video, use it as a way to see a webcam preview, and so on.

Encryption in Gentoo and GNOME

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Gentoo
GNOME
  • On OpenPGP (GnuPG) key management

    Over the time, a number of developers have had problems following the Gentoo OpenPGP key policy (GLEP 63. In particular, the key expiration requirements have resulted in many developers wanting to replace their key unnecessarily. I’ve been asked to write some instructions on managing your OpenPGP key, and I’ve decided to go for a full blog post with some less-known tips. I won’t be getting into detailed explanations how to use GnuPG though — you may still need to read the documentation after all.

    [...]

    Signing keys are used to sign data, i.e. to prove its authenticity. Using multiple signing subkeys is rather trivial — you can explicitly specify the key to use while creating a signature (note that you need to append ! to key-id to force non-default subkey), and GnuPG will automatically use the correct subkey when verifying the signature. To reduce the wear of your main signing subkey, you can create a separate signing subkey for Gentoo commits. Or you can go ever further, and have a separate signing subkey for each machine you’re using (and keep only the appropriate key on each machine).

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 2)

    The encryption is a needed feature but encryption is hard to do in rooms. Matrix uses public-key cryptography, for rooms they are using Megolm, that's a protocol to exchange encrypted messages with more than one and share that message keys in a one-to-one secure communication.

    I don't know a lot about this E2E because for me it's more important to have the client working with a basic functionality before the encryption. So you should read the official doc because maybe this that I'm writing here is completely wrong.

    To do all this E2E key sharing, client side encryption and communication, Riot has three different implementations of the same lib, so they have this code in the JavaScript SDK, the same ported to iOS version in ObjectiveC and the same ported to Android in Java. Below this lib there's the libolm that does the real encryption.

GNOME: GNOME Web, Purism, Report From Fractal Hackfest

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GNOME
  • Work is Underway to Make the GNOME Web Browser Mobile Friendly

    To do well, the upcoming Linux-powered Librem 5 smartphone will need a decent set of mobile-ready apps — and a good web browser is key to that.

    Hoping to step up to the plate is GNOME Web (aka Epiphany), whose developers are working hard to make sure that the webkit-based browser is in fine form for finger-friendly fun while surfing.

  • Purism wants to create a GNOME mobile shell for Linux smartphones (and other Librem 5 phone update)

    Linux computer maker Purism hopes to ship their smartphone in January, and the corporation has been providing updates about development of the upcoming Librem 5 smartphone periodically since launching a crowdfunding campaign last September (that campaign eventually raised more than $1.5 million through pre-orders).

    We know that the phone will feature an NXP i.MX8 processor, that it will ship with a custom version of Purism’s PureOS operating system, and that it will support several different user interfaces and operating systems including Ubuntu Touch, KDE Plasma Mobile, and Purism’s own GNOME-based user interface.

  • Fractal Hackfest, Strasbourg (day 1

    Yesterday was the first day in the first Fractal Hackfest. I'll try to write an small blog post every day to share the development with the world.

    My travel to Strasbourg was not an easy travel because I've to take two flights to get here from Málaga so a long day travelling.

    I met with Mathew from Matrix.org at the London airport because we took the same flight to here and it was really cool to meet him in person and we talk a little about the current Matrix situation.

    I've met the other Fractal people and collaborators at the event, and it's great that people from Purism, Matrix, Gnome and the two GSoC students come here to work together in this great application.

Librem 5 Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Will Feature a GNOME Mobile UI Shell

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Linux
GNOME

Director of Creative at Purism, François Téchené, talks is a recent report about the first real design attempts of the user interface of Librem 5, which will be using a UI shell based on the GNOME desktop environment. The first version of this GNOME-based mobile UI shell for Librem 5 is called internally as “phosh” and will focus on efficiency and robustness, and Purism even wants to push it upstream as the "GNOME mobile shell."

"Our goal with the Librem 5 is to improve the visual identity of the Librem line while staying close to the minimalist and humble look that characterize the existing Librem line," said François Téchené, Director of Creative at Purism. "The main challenge of case design is the need to balance aesthetics, ergonomics, convenience, and technical limitations."

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Also: Purism Shows Off Latest GNOME Mobile Shell Mockups For The Librem 5

KDE and GNOME: Cutelyst 2.3.0, Discovering Gwenview, First Look at GNOME’s Stylish New Login & Lock Screens

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KDE
GNOME
  • Cutelyst 2.3.0 released

    Cutelyst – The C++ Web Framework built with Qt, has a new release.

    In this release a behavior change was made, when asking for POST or URL query parameters and cookies that have multiple keys the last inserted one (closer to the right) is returned, previously QMap was filled in reverse order so that values() would have them in left to right order. However this is not desired and most other frameworks also return the last inserted value. To still have the ordered list Request::queryParameters(“key”) builds a list in the left to right order (while QMap::values() will have them reversed).

    Some fixes on FastCGI implementation as well as properly getting values when uWSGI FastCGI protocol was in use.

  • Discovering the Gwenview photo viewer

    The Gwenview photo viewer is a great application and one of the reasons why I never looked back when I switched from Windows (Vista) to openSUSE (11.1). The application is installed by default when you install openSUSE with the KDE plasma desktop environment. But even if you have the GNOME desktop environment installed, I would recommend that you to install Gwenview. In my opinion, it is superior to the GNOME image viewer application.

    Default applications often get overlooked. We just expect them to be there. But there are big differences when it comes to default applications. Take for instance the GNOME image viewer or Windows Photo Viewer. You can do a couple of basic things like zoom in, zoom out and move from photo to photo. You can put it in full screen mode and go back. And of course you can open, save, print and close photos. But that is basically it. Gwenview does a lot more.

    So lets get to it. There are basically 2 ways to open Gwenview. The first way is to (double) click a photo in the Dolphin file manager (another great default application). The second way is to open Gwenview via the kickoff menu, by typing in the name in the search box or by looking at the Graphics section of the menu.

  • First Look: GNOME’s Stylish New Login & Lock Screens

    GNOME devs are working on an improved GNOME Shell login and lock screen — and it’s looking great!

    Sharing images of the proposed new lock, unlock and login screen designs on his blog is GNOME’s Allan Day, who says the redesigns are the fruits of a week-long design hackfest GNOME held in London last year.

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment to Offer New Lock and Login Screen Experiences

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GNOME

GNOME 3.30 will be the next major release of the open source desktop environment used by numerous GNU/Linux distributions, and now that Ubuntu is using it by default for the latest LTS release, all eyes are on GNOME these days to see what improvements and new features will bring with the next update.

The login and lock screens of GNOME haven't been changed for a while now, but it would appear the team had been working to revamp them. As you can see from the screenshot gallery attached below, the design looks marvelous, and we have to admit that we can't wait to try them out on our personal computers.

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GNOME: DFN Workshop, Fedora Atomic Workstation, Endless OS

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GNOME
  • Talking on PrivacyScore at DFN Security Conference 2018 in Hamburg, Germany

    I seem to have skipped last year, but otherwise I have been to the DFN Workshop regularly. While I had a publication at this venue before, it’s only this year that I got to have a the conference.

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation → Team Silverblue

    Fedora Atomic Workstation, which I’ve enjoyed it quite a bit. But all good things must come to an end. So, no more Atomic Workstation for me …since we’re renaming it to Team Silverblue.

  • Updating Endless OS to GNOME Shell 3.26 (Video)

    It’s been a pretty hectic time during the past months for me here at Endless, busy with updating our desktop to the latest stable version of GNOME Shell (3.26, at the time the process started), among other things. And in all this excitement, it seems like I forgot to blog so I think this time I’ll keep it short for once, and simply link to a video I made a couple of months ago, right when I was about to finish the first phase of the process (which ended up taking a bit longer than expected).

    Note that the production of this video is far from high quality (unsurprisingly), but the feedback I got so far is that it has been apparently very useful to explain to less technically inclined people what doing a rebase of this characteristics means, and with that in mind I woke up this morning realizing that it might be good to give it its own entry in my personal blog, so here it is.

KDE and GNOME 'Summer of Code' and More

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KDE
GNOME
  • Calamares and Google Summer of Code

    This year Calamares is participating in Google’s Summer of Code. While Calamares doesn’t live under the KDE umbrella — for political reasons, basically, to emplasize that it is a desktop-agnostic system installer — it has a great deal of KDE DNA inside. The maintainers (that’s Teo, then myself) have been KDE people, some of the technology is definitely KDE (KPMCore in particular). So we’re happy to be participating under the KDE umbrella in a mixed KPMCore / Calamares role.

  • Wireless setting for Plasma Mobile

    Month after my proposed design (but in truth i am working on this for longer time), i am finally finished basic functionality for wireless section of mobile settings. Basics of UI is also almost done, even it’s need some polishing and good criticism of designers.

  • Google Summer of Code 2018 – Introduction & Community Bonding

    I have been selected to participate in Google Summer of Code 2018, where I will collaborate in KDE Partition Manager and Calamares under KDE Community. My proposal involves finishing the LVM support and implementing RAID support in kpmcore, KDE Partition Manager and Calamares. For those who want to know more details about it, here is my proposal link.

  • What did go well with the action bar proposal?

    In a previous blog post I asked feedback about adding an always visible action bar to Nautilus that integrated the floating bar info too.

    It was very useful, as most of you confirmed our suspicions that it was too heavy, so we researched for a better solution for the goals we had: Make actions more discoverable, have good touch support and better pointer accessibility (not being able to access actions in list view anyone?).

  • An overview of how Fractal works
  • Proposal accepted for GSoC 2018
  • Hello World

    'Pænt goddag' (Danish greeting). My name is Niclas Moeslund Overby. You can find me on IRC as noverby and Matrix as @noverby:matrix.org. GNOME/Linux have been my daily driver for 7 years and I follow every blog from GNOME and Fedora planet, so I feel heavily invested in FOSS ecosystem. I know GNOME contributor Bastian Ilsø from my participation in Open Source Aalborg, where we had a weekly meet-up with workshops and talks all about Open Source.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2018 Call for Papers is now open

    GNOME.Asia Summit is the featured annual GNOME conference in Asia. It focuses primarily on the GNOME desktop, but also covers applications and the platform development tools. The summit brings together the GNOME community in Asia to provide a forum for users, developers, foundation leaders, governments and businesses to discuss the present technology and future developments.

  • FOSDEM 2018

    Last weekend I was in Brussels for FOSDEM, a super awesome conference about free and open source software. Since my first year, three years ago, a few things have changed. This year I went as a speaker and I brought with me a talk about my experience writing Teleport, my first GTK+ application. I really hope I could motivate somebody to start their own project. Also, in the past year my relationship to free software has changed, from just being a user and advocate to an active contributor (primarily to the GNOME Project).

  • Animating a ScrolledWindow

    The other day I worked on improving the auto-scroll in Fractal (a super cool GTK+ Matrix Client). While doing this I discovered some nice features in GTK+.

  • GSoC 2018: Introduction

    Fast-forward two years, I have a couple of small Rust projects and some contributions and continuing to enjoy the language. So, it should be of no surprise that when I learned about GSoC I started looking for Rust-related projects. I applied to both Xi (a novel text editor with a fully async architecture) and librsvg (a GNOME library for rendering SVG files) and got accepted into librsvg on a project to help with the ongoing effort to port it to Rust, specifically the SVG filter effects.

    [...]

    Next comes the most interesting part, experimenting with Rust abstractions over common filter actions, such as iterating over pixels in various ways, like one by one or using a square window. This has to be fast and ergonomic and support the different filter use cases.

  • YAMLing the flathub

    The most common way to build flatpak is using a tool called flatpak-builder. This is a tool that takes a higher level description of the sources that go into an application and generate the build commands to build it. This description is called a manifest, and is traditionally a JSON file.

    JSON is very common in the web world, and it is a well known format that have many implementations. However, it is not really great for humans to write.

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