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GNOME

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment Enters Beta, Final Release Arrives September 5

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GNOME

The GNOME Project through Javier Jardón announced today the release and general availability of the beta version of the forthcoming GNOME 3.30 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

GNOME 3.30 is the next major release of the acclaimed desktop environment used by numerous GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular Ubuntu, and it promises to bring lots of new features and improvements when it will hit the streets next month on September 5. A beta version is available today for bleeding-edge users brave enough to install it on their computers.

"GNOME 3.29.90 is now available. This is the beta release for the upcoming stable GNOME 3.30 release. At this point, we have entered feature freeze, UI freeze, and API freeze, so developers should be focused on bug fixes and stability improvements for the next month as we approach GNOME 3.30," writes Javier Jardón on behalf of the GNOME Release Team.

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Also:

  • GNOME 3.29.90 (3.30 beta) RELEASED

    GNOME 3.29.90 is now available. This is the beta release for the
    upcoming stable GNOME 3.30 release. At this point, we have entered
    feature freeze, UI freeze, and API freeze, so developers should be
    focused on bugfixes and stability improvements for the next month as we
    approach GNOME 3.30.

  • GNOME 3.29.90 Out Ahead Of Next Month's GNOME 3.30 Release

    The GNOME 3.30 Release Candidate (v3.29.90) is now available that also marks the UI, API, and feature freezes for this next desktop environment update debuting in September.

GNOME and GIMP Receive $400K from Handshake Decentralized Certificate Authority

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GNOME

The Handshake organization apparently launched today at handshake.org, and they already donated $10.2 million US dollars that they've collected from various project sponsors to several Free and Open Source Software projects, including GNOME Foundation, which received $300,000, and the GIMP project, which received the rest of $100,000 USD.

GNOME Foundation is the non-profit organization behind the popular GNOME desktop environment used by numerous Linux-based operating systems by default, including Ubuntu, or available in their software repositories. On the other hand, the GIMP Project is the creator of the famous GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) open-source image editing and viewing software for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms.

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GNOME: Supporting Developers, Fractal (Matrix client for GNOME), Mutter and GUADEC 2018

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GNOME
  • Supporting developers on Patreon (and similar)

    For some time now I been supporting two Linux developers on patreon. Namely Ryan Gordon of Linux game porting and SDL development fame and Tanu Kaskinen who is a lead developer on PulseAudio these days.

    One of the things I often think about is how we can enable more people to make a living from working on the Linux desktop and related technologies. If your reading my blog there is a good chance that you are enabling people to make a living on working on the Linux desktop by paying for RHEL Workstation subscriptions through your work. So a big thank you for that. The fact that Red Hat has paying customers for our desktop products is critical in terms of our ability to do so much of the maintenance and development work we do around the Linux Desktop and Linux graphics stack.

    That said I do feel we need more venues than just employment by companies such as Red Hat and this is where I would love to see more people supporting their favourite projects and developers through for instance Patreon. Because unlike one of funding campaigns repeat crowdfunding like Patreon can give developers predictable income, which means they don’t have to worry about how to pay their rent or how to feed their kids.

  • Improve the styling of quotes in Fractal

    Fractal is a Matrix client for GNOME and is written in Rust. Matrix is an open network for secure, decentralized communication.

    These past weeks, I’ve been working on an implementation of a context menu for the messages and on the improvement of the styling for the quotes in the messages. I will talk about the context menu in an other article later. So I’m going to talk about the new styling of the quotes.

    You can have a look at the issue here. The idea was to add a visual distinction between the quotes and regular text in messages: the text of a quote would be dimmed, with a 2px left blue border and a 6px left padding; there would be also a 6px vertical space separating the quotes and the rest of the text.

  • Mutter Gets More Crash Fixes, GNOME Shell Better Deals With 100%+ Volumes

    The GNOME 3.30 beta is being prepped for release and the UI/API/ABI freezes are now in place ahead of this desktop environment update to ship as stable in September. GNOME Shell and Mutter have staged their latest development releases for testing.

    When there is either remote desktop active, screen casting/recording, or remote control taking place, an indicator is added to the panel at the top of the screen for informing the user about this ongoing process as well as an option for turning off this remote access.

    Another practical change with this GNOME Shell 3.30 Beta is for supporting volumes above 100%. As outlined in this bug report since last year there has been some problematic behavior with the GNOME Shell such as if using a volume-up key and your volume is already above 100%, it would instead reset the volume to 100%.

  • GUADEC 2018

    Various social events make GUADEC my favourite conference. Castle tour and Flamenco show were my top 2 picks. Emm, wait. Beach party make it to top 3 as well. I enjoyed it a lot, although I can’t swim. It definitely encourages me to learn to swim.

  • Irony is the hygiene of the mind

    At a recent NetSurf developer weekend Michael Drake mentioned a talk he had seen at the Guadec conference which reference the use of sanitizers for improving the security and correctness of programs.

GNOME: JavaScript Extensions, Vala and More

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GNOME
  • Common Fedora Workstation Crashes Traced Back to GNOME JavaScript Extensions

    A recent spate of Fedora Workstation crashes and other issues with the GNOME Shell has been traced back to GNOME Shell extensions written in JavaScript, as discovered by GNOME developer and Red Hat engineering manager Jiri Eischmann.

    Being able to write GNOME Shell extensions in JavaScript has been regarded as an interesting concept with a low barrier to entry, but it appears that it is in fact causing problems for users within the GNOME desktop environment. Even worse yet is that the current GNOME Shell environment defaults to Wayland with the Mutter compositor, so it takes some pretty hard crashes, compared to GNOME X.Org sessions that have the occasional blank screen or similar issue.

  • GNOME Might Need To Crack Down On Their JavaScript Extensions

    Longtime GNOME developer and Red Hat engineering manager Jiri Eischmann has looked at recent Fedora Workstation crashes and other problems happening with the GNOME Shell and the most common denominator is problems caused by the GNOME Shell extensions written in JavaScript.

    While being able to write GNOME Shell extensions in JavaScript was fascinating at first and a low barrier to entry, they seem to be responsible for recent problems users are encountering with the GNOME desktop. Making matters worse is that with the current GNOME Shell environment defaulting to Wayland with the Mutter compositor, when it crashes, it crashes hard. That's compared to when the GNOME X.Org session running into problems running into just a screen blank and being able to restore the clients.

  • Vala 0.41.90 Released

    Vala development has never been stopped. New features and better code generation is present in recent development version.

    This is like a “Beta” version, so go ahead and test with your new code.

    Checkout that now is possible to annotate an automatic property, with a [GtkChild] attribute, making possible to bind directly your XML builder defined widget to your class, so is easy to create powerful custom widgets.

    Also checkout Vala deprecations remove <= 0.22, so your Vala code could fail to compile. Just port to new API bindings.

  • GNOME Data Access 6.0

    At master there are a set of fixes for GDA Library and its GTK+ widgets, its Control Center for Data Sources Management and its powerful GDA Browser.

    Next major 6.0 release, is breaking API/ABI from older releases, in order to improve GObject Introspection bindings, including Vala ones.

    One step forward to use Meson build system, has been done too. Indeed, that work helps to speed up development.

  • WebKitGTK and WPE gains WebRTC support back!

    WebRTC is a w3c draft protocol that "enables rich, high-quality RTP applications to be developed for the browser, mobile platforms, and IoT devices, and allow them all to communicate via a common set of protocols". The protocol is mainly used to provide video conferencing systems from within web browsers.

Story of GNOME Shell Extensions

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GNOME

A long time ago (exactly 10 years ago) it was decided that the the shell for GNOME would be written in JavaScript. GNOME 3 was still looking for its new face, a lot of UI experimentation was taking place, and JavaScript looked like the best candidate for it. Moreover it was a popular language on the web, so barriers to entry for new contributors would be significantly lowered.

When you have the shell written in JavaScript you can very easily patch it and alter its look and behaviour. And that’s what people started doing. Upstream was not very keen to officially support extensions due to their nature: they’re just hot patching the GNOME Shell code. They have virtually unlimited possibilities in changing look and behaviour, but also in introducing instability.

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GNOME: Shell Activities, GNOME Twitch and Games

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GNOME
  • Gnome Shell YouTube Search Provider Lets You Play YouTube Videos In VLC

    YouTube Search Provider is a new extension for Gnome Shell which can be used to search for YouTube videos directly from the Gnome Shell Activities and play them using a desktop video player, like VLC.

  • Watch your favourite streamers from GNU/Linux with GNOME Twitch

    Streaming is a big deal nowadays in the gaming world; what used to be boring and weird, watching someone else play a videogame, is now something that millions of people spend their free time doing, often watching their favourite Twitch / YouTube celebrities gaming.

    While there is a Twitch application available for Windows and Mac users, there isn’t an official one for GNU/Linux users – but there is an unofficial one: GNOME Twitch.

    Linux users may watch streams on the official Twitch website using their favorite web browser, or use GNOME Twitch to do so.

  • Ruxandra Simion: Five-or-More Modernisation - Now They Move!

    These past two weeks I have worked on (probably) the most exciting part of modernising the Five or More game. After the new changes, the game is officially playable and fun! But still, there is room for more changes. So let’s jump right to the updates.

    First of all, if you remember reading my previous blog post, there were no means to interact with a shape, or otherwise move it to any desired cell. The cells inside the game board were filled up randomly on click, using the queue on the top left corner of the window, which contained the next shapes to be rendered inside the game area.

    Now, all of that changed, and the user can interact with each individual shape rendered on the game board. The pathfinding system I came up with uses the A* algorithm with a Manhattan distance heuristic to determine the shortest path from the current cell to the destination cell chosen by the player.

GNOME/GUADEC and KDE Software With Microsoft/Windows DRM

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KDE
GNOME
  • Back from GUADEC 2018

    Been a while since GUADEC 2018 has ended but subsequent travels and tasks reduced the time to write up a quick summary of what happened during this year’s GNOME conference.

  • GUADEC Thoughts

    This month I had the amazing opportunity to attend GUADEC, the GNOME community conference in Europe! The GNOME Foundation generously sponsored this trip as part of my Google Summer of Code project and I can’t thank them enough!

  • Krita in the Windows Store: an update

    We’ve published Krita in the Windows store for quite some time now. Not quite a year, but we’ve updated our Store listing almost twenty times. By far the majority of users get Krita from this website: about 30,000 downloads a week. Store downloads are only about 125 a week. Still, the income generated makes it possible for the Krita maintainer to work on Krita full-time, which would not have been possible otherwise.

    That’s good, because combining a day job and working on Krita is a sure recipe for a burn-out. (Donations fund Dmitry’s work, but there aren’t enough donations to fund two people at the same time: we have about 2000 euros per month in donations.)

GNOME: Nautilus 3.30 and Another GUADEC Report

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  • GNOME's Nautilus 3.30 File Manager Delivering Some Pleasant Improvements

    Feature development on GNOME 3.30 is nearing the end ahead of the stable desktop environment update premiering in September. Nautilus developer Carlos Soriano has provided a look at some of the improvements coming to GNOME's file manager for the 3.30 milestone.

  • GUADEC report

    I prefer to be honest, not everybody has a good experience when going to the GUADEC conference, for me it was a really bad experience. I’ve stopped all my GNOME contributions since then (and I don’t think I will come back anytime soon).

    Let’s start at the beginning, to arrive to Almería, my plane departed at 6am, so I needed to wake up at 2:40am, and I slept maybe one hour. (I was a bit stressed, it was the first time that I took the plane alone, so I needed to figure out how it works etc, and I don’t really like to travel in general. I must also note that it’s not really good for me to not sleep enough, I have a fragile mental health). But I arrived to Almería and the Civitas dormitory smoothly (I had the chance to have a direct flight), the day before the conference started.

    First thing that didn’t go well, during the first afternoon, but I was not 100% sure. I had the impression that Christian Hergert, in a group discussion where I was present, was mocking me, thinking that I was not able to understand him (I had a discussion with him just before, where indeed I didn’t understand what he was saying, he needed to re-explain several times until I understood). English is not my native language, and I’ve always had difficulties to understand a native English speaker. I don’t have difficulties to read/write (at least for something related to computer science), but I have far less practice for oral skills (especially listening, I’m trying to improve myself by watching movies in English subtitled in English since some time). Of course it gets worse when I’m tired, like it was the case the first afternoon (I tried to do a nap, without success).

Belated GUADEC Coverage

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GNOME
  • The Developer Center Initiative – Call for Participants

    The Developer Center Initiative had a call after the GUADEC BoF. We had 13 participants which I think is a great start. We need the manpower too!

    I’m going to summarize our call meeting in a blog post soon, but first I want to introduce the people and their interests. Note: this list is so far only consisting of people who participated in the call. You can sign up below!

  • Alexandru Fazakas: GUADEC 2018

    This july I attended the Gnome Users and Developers European Conference taking place in Almería, Spain.

    Initially, I had no idea what to expect out of it. I have been told it’s a great event with people from all around the world and a lot of fun stuff going on. After booking both my flights and my lodging, first thing I did was sign up for the event. The registration process gave us the option of volunteering there. Having attended a few other events (read: music festivals, heh) as a volunteer and barely knowing anyone who would be at GUADEC (aside from my mentor and a couple of fellow GSoC students), I concluded this would be a good way to make new friends while helping around wherever needed. I am glad to say this was a great call and I enjoyed it a lot. Registration desk was mostly what I helped with, but at need, I also helped with introducing speakers (which also meant I introduced my mentor Carlos’ talk!), handing microphones at the Q&A part of the talks and a few other things. Volunteering felt great and (should I attend next year’s GUADEC) I’d love to get more involved in it, maybe even coordinate the volunteers or help coordinating them.

  • An overview of this summer’s community conferences

    This summer, we have been kept busy with a number of things. As you can see with the many blog posts from the Librem 5 phone development team (many more are scheduled to be published in the coming days and weeks), we have been heavily focused on preparing the software platform for the phone, as well as designing the hardware to be manufactured for the development kits and the components that will be used for the production phone.

    However, our work does not happen in isolation, hence why many of us attend FLOSS conferences as part of our collaborative development model. Whenever and wherever possible, we aim to supplement our attendance with sponsorship of those important Free Software events.

GNOME 3.30 Will Bring a Better Flatpak Experience to the Nautilus File Manager

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GNOME

As part of a new major release of the GNOME desktop environment, most of its core components and apps are getting new features and improvements, and Files a.k.a. Nautilus is one of the most important components of GNOME as it allows users to manage their files and folders of the operating system where GNOME is installed.

With the upcoming GNOME 3.30 release, the Nautilus file manager is getting a bunch of new features and improvements that have recently been revealed as part of the beta version that landed this week in the project's download servers for early adopters and public beta testers ahead of next week's GNOME 3.30 Beta release.

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Android Leftovers

Elementary OS Juno Beta 2 Released

Elementary OS June beta 2 is now available to download. This second beta build of the Ubuntu-based Linux distribution touts a number of changes over the elementary OS june beta released back in July. Due to the shifting sands on which Juno is built the elementary team advise those planning on testing the release to do so by making a fresh install rather than doing an upgrade from beta 1 or (worse) an older version of elementary OS. Read more

today's howtos

Linux - The beginning of the end

You should never swear at people under you - I use the word under in the hierarchical sense. Colleagues? Well, probably not, although you should never hold back on your opinion. Those above you in the food chain? It's fair game. You risk it to biscuit it. I say, Linus shouldn't have used the language he did in about 55-65% of the cases. In those 55-65% of the cases, he swore at people when he should have focused on swearing at the technical solution. The thing is, people can make bad products but that does not make them bad people. It is important to distinguish this. People often forget this. And yes, sometimes, there is genuine malice. My experience shows that malice usually comes with a smile and lots of sloganeering. The typical corporate setup is an excellent breeding ground for the aspiring ladder climber. Speaking of Linus, it is also vital to remember that the choice of language does not always define people, especially when there are cultural differences - it's their actions. In the remainder of the cases where "bad" language was used (if we judge it based on the approved corporate lingo vocab), the exchange was completely impersonal - or personal from the start on all sides - in which case, it's a different game. The problem is, it's the whole package. You don't selective get to pick a person's attributes. Genius comes with its flaws. If Linus was an extroverted stage speaker who liked to gushy-mushy chitchat and phrase work problems in empty statements full of "inspiring" and "quotable" one-liners, he probably wouldn't be the developer that he is, and we wouldn't have Linux. So was he wrong in some of those cases? Yes. Should he have apologized? Yes, privately, because it's a private matter. Definitely not the way it was done. Not a corporate-approved kangaroo court. The outcome of this story is disturbing. A public, humiliating apology is just as bad. It's part of the wider corporate show, where you say how sorry you are on screen (the actual remorse is irrelevant). Linus might actually be sorry, and he might actually be seeking to improve his communication style - empathy won't be part of that equation, I guarantee that. But this case - and a few similar ones - set a precedence. People will realize, if someone like Linus gets snubbed for voicing his opinion - and that's what it is after all, an opinion, regardless of the choice of words and expletives - how will they be judged if they do something similar. But not just judged. Placed in the (social) media spotlight and asked to dance to a tune of fake humility in order to satisfy the public thirst for theatrics. You are not expected to just feel remorse. You need to do a whole stage grovel. And once the seed of doubt creeps in, people start normalizing. It's a paradox that it's the liberal, democratic societies that are putting so much strain on the freedom of communication and speech. People forget the harsh lessons of the past and the bloody struggles their nations went through to ensure people could freely express themselves. Now, we're seeing a partial reversal. But it's happening. The basket of "not allowed" words is getting bigger by the day. This affects how people talk, how they frame their issues, how they express themselves. This directly affects their work. There is less and less distinction between professional disagreement and personal slight. In fact, people deliberately blur the lines so they can present their business ineptitude as some sort of Dreyfuss witchhunt against their glorious selves. As an ordinary person slaving in an office so you can pay your bills and raise your mediocre children, you may actually not want to say something that may be construed as "offensive" even though it could be a legitimate complaint, related to your actual work. This leads to self-censored, mind-numbing normalization. People just swallow their pride, suppress their problems, focus on the paycheck, and just play the life-draining corporate game. Or they have an early stroke. Read more Also: Google Keeps Pushing ChromeOS and Android Closer Together