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GNOME

GNOME and KDE: GTK, KEXI, KookBook and Krita

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Theme changes, revisited

    We’ve made a 3.24.4 release, to fix up a few oversights in 3.24.3. This release does not include the new theme yet, we will push that to the next release.

    We’ve also made another NewAdwaita tarball, which includes refinements based on some of the suggestions we received since last week.

  • KEXI 3.2 Beta

    Yesterday KEXI 3.2 Beta shipped, effect of improvements from entire 2018. Full info in the wiki.

    That's best KEXI to date! Pun intended because among other things one is especially worth mentioning, entirely new and final date/time grammar for user's SQL.

  • KookBook 0.2.1 – now actually kind of useful

    There was a snag in the KookBook 0.2.0 release, and 0.2.1 is available.

  • Krita Interview with Edgar Tadeo

    Comparing to Photoshop, I think Krita can make good digital painting that looks like it was made with a real brush. However,  PS is not a paint program, Krita’s advantage is its brushes.

GNOME/Xfce/GTK: Exo 0.12.4 and Libhandy 0.0.7 Released

Filed under
GNU
GNOME
  • Exo 0.12.4 Released

    Exo 0.12.4 is now available with an improved icon view, better icon rendering, and reduced disk usage.

  • My Name is Handy, Lib Handy

    Libhandy 0.0.7 just got released!

    [...]

    A common pattern in GNOME applications is lists, which are typically implemented via GtkListBox. More specific patterns arose, where rows have a title at the start, an optional subtitle below it, actions at the end and an icon or some other widget like a radio button as a prefix. These rows can also be expanded to reveal nested rows or anything else that fits the need.

    So far every application using these patterns implemented the rows by hand for each and every row. It made using these a bit cumbersome and it led to inconsistencies in sizing, even inside a single application. To make these patterns easier to use, we implemented HdyActionRow, HdyComboRow and HdyExpanderRow.

Addressing Icons Themes (Again)

Filed under
GNOME

I wrote some time ago on how platforms have a responsibility to respect the identity of applications, but now there’s some rumblings that Ubuntu’s community-built Yaru icon set (which is a derivative of the Suru icon set I maintain) intends to ignore this and infringe upon applications’ brands by modifying their icons...

[...]

For instance, the entire point of the GNOME icon refresh initiative is to address visual mismatches between third-party app icons and GNOME icons and we been have reaching out to developers to see about updating their icons to new design—this is the appropriate approach for a platform visual overhaul, by the way—which could always use more help on.

Now I don’t see this ever happening, but I have hopes that someday Ubuntu will fully embrace GNOME and promote it as its desktop solution—especially given the desktop is out of the scope of the Ubuntu business these days.

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GNOME Software Package Manager to Feature Better Flatpak Support for GNOME 3.32

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GNOME

GNOME Software, the app used for installing, updating, and removing software from your GNOME-based GNU/Linux operating system, will get a major revamp in functionality for the upcoming GNOME 3.32 desktop environment.
A new development snapshot of GNOME Software 3.32 landed this week with lots of improvements for the Flatpak universal package format, allowing new permissions for Flatpak updates and displaying permissions for installed Flatpak apps. GNOME Software also now shows correct version numbers for installed Flatpaks.

The update mechanism for Flatpak apps was switched to use a single transaction, allowing the GNOME developers to share more code with the flatpak command-line utility, and it looks like GNOME Software 3.32 will offer better support for installing Flatpak repository files, also known as flatpakref, and for Flatpak plugins.

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Builder 3.32 Sightings

Filed under
Development
GNOME

We just landed the largest refactor to Builder since it’s inception. Somewhere around 100,000 lines of code where touched which is substantial for a single development cycle. I wrote a few tools to help us do that work, because that’s really the only way to do such a large refactor.

Not only does the refactor make things easier for us to maintain but it will make things easier for contributors to write new plugins. In a future blog post I’ll cover some of the new design that makes it possible.

Let’s take a look at some of the changes in Builder for 3.32 as users will see them.

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Theme changes in GTK 3

Filed under
GNOME

Adwaita has been the default GTK+ theme for quite a while now (on all platforms). It has served us well, but Adwaita hasn’t seen major updates in some time, and there is a desire to give it a refresh.

Updating Adwaita is a challenge, since most GTK applications are using the stable 3.x series, and some of them include Adwaita-compatible theming for their own custom widgets. Given the stable nature of this release series, we don’t want to cause theme compatibility issues for applications. At the same time, 3.x is the main GTK version in use today, and we want to ensure that GTK applications don’t feel stale or old fashioned.

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Also: GNOME Developers Are Testing A Revised GTK3 Theme

Canonical Patches GNOME Bluetooth Vulnerability on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Update Now

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Security researcher Chris Marchesi recently discovered a security vulnerability, documented as CVE-2018-10910, in the BlueZ Linux Bluetooth stack, which made it incorrectly handle disabling Bluetooth visibility, allowing a remote attacker to possibly pair to Bluetooth devices.

Canonical was quick to release today patched versions of the BlueZ components for the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, addressing the security vulnerability, which might also affects all of the derivatives of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, including Xubuntu, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, and Ubuntu MATE.

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More GNOME Performance Optimizations Being Tackled Thanks To Canonical

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

While there has already been a lot of exciting GNOME performance improvements so far during the GNOME 3.32 cycle, even more could be on the way with there still being a number of open merge requests for enhancing the performance of the GNOME desktop.

Since Ubuntu switched from Unity back to GNOME, Canonical has been contributing more upstream patches to the GNOME stack. Ubuntu/Canonical developer Daniel Van Vugt in particular has been spearheading many of the desktop performance initiatives. He has landed a number of improvements in recent months but he has many open merge requests still to be addressed.

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‘Celluloid’ is the new name of GNOME MPV

Filed under
GNOME

Celluloid is the name of a “transparent flammable plastic made in sheets from camphor and nitrocellulose, formerly used for cinematographic film” i.e. movies — perfect choice for a movie player, no?

There also isn’t a lot (if any) similar software using the name, either. Similar names can create all sort of problems, ranging from packaging conflicts to promotional crossed-wires.

Naturally there is, of course, a new icon to represent the newly-renamed app on users’ desktops.

The Celluloid icon is modelled after a frame of celluloid film and has a generic play icon and seekbar overlaid to denote that it’s a player.

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Also: GNOME Outreachy mentorship

GNOME 3.32 Will Do A Better Job Picking The Primary GPU - Helping Out USB Displays, Etc

Filed under
GNOME

The work around better GPU/infrastructure handling for GNOME 3.32 continues with the most recent work merged this weekend being for better handling by Mutter over deciding the primary GPU of the system in multi-GPU systems whether it be multiple graphics cards, notebooks with dual GPUs, or systems with a USB-based external display adapter.

Emilio Pozuelo Monfort of Collabora has been working on a primary GPU rework to better decide how GNOME chooses the primary GPU of the system. The primary change of this work appears to be ensuring that the primary GPU is capable of hardware rendering and that Mutter doesn't accidentally choose a GPU only backed by LLVMpipe or other software renderer. There is also a new fallback for CPU-based copying from secondary GPUs with a software renderer, which is said to provide better performance and help with synchronization.

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