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GNOME

3rd Party Software in Fedora Workstation

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

So you have probably noticed by now that we started offering some 3rd party software in the latest Fedora Workstation namely Google Chrome, Steam, NVidia driver and PyCharm. This has come about due to a long discussion in the Fedora community on how we position Fedora Workstation and how we can improve our user experience. The principles we base of this policy you can read up on in this policy document. To sum it up though the idea is that while the Fedora operating system you install will continue as it has been for the last decade to be based on only free software (with an exception for firmware) you will be able to more easily find and install the plethora of applications out there through our software store application, GNOME Software. We also expect that as the world of Linux software moves towards containers in general and Flatpaks specifically we will have an increasing number of these 3rd party applications available in Fedora.

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GNOMEs beat Microsoft: Git Virtual File System to get a new name

Filed under
Microsoft
GNOME

Microsoft is going to rename the Git Virtual File System to eliminate its clash with GNOMErs.

The purpose of the Git Virtual File System was laudable: Redmond's developers were sick of taking the afternoon off after typing “git clone” (even “git checkout” could take hours), so they gave GitHub users a workaround.

At the time, Microsoft's Saeed Noursalehi explained that GVFS “virtualises the file system beneath your repo and makes it appear as though all the files in your repo are present, but in reality only downloads a file the first time it is opened.”

At last, developers could handle terabyte-size repos without taking up knitting.

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GNOME: Security vulnerability in Epiphany, Nautilus File Operations and More

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GNOME
  • Security vulnerability in Epiphany Technology Preview

    If you use Epiphany Technology Preview, please update immediately and ensure you have revision 3.29.2-26 or newer. We discovered and resolved a vulnerability that allowed websites to access internal Epiphany features and thereby exfiltrate passwords from the password manager. We apologize for this oversight.

    The unstable Epiphany 3.29.2 release is the only affected release. Epiphany 3.29.1 is not affected. Stable releases, including Epiphany 3.28, are also not affected.

  • Nautilus File Operations

    While unit tests are meant to be fairly short and simple, tackling individual instances of a functionality or component, Nautilus would not really allow us to do that. Due to Nautilus’ nature and its tight relation to I/O operations, unit testing for us meant cherry-picking the simpler functions which we use and testing these. However, for the larger, more important components, we’d rely on integration tests, which represented one of the following items on our list.

  • 23rd of April

    Lo and behold (not as surprising as it was for me considering I am writing this) my project had been accepted and I was about to start my bonding period as an official member and contributor under the GNOME community!

    I doubt I’ll soon (if ever) forget the feelings I went through as I saw my name listed there. At first, I could not find myself. The GNOME projects list kept going and going, I even went past my fellow Nautilus GSOC’er project and would not see my name. Eventually, I saw it, “Tests, profiling and debug framework for Nautilus” with my name on top of it. It just felt both rewarding (as I had been contributing to Nautilus for a while up to that point) and relaxing, knowing I would get to contribute to something I use on my day-to-day work and alongside the people I got to learn so much from, all whilst being a part a of a huge project, whose name is familiar to millions of users.

KDE and GNOME: This Week in Usability & Productivity, Krita, Pitivi and More

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 21

    Another week, another dose of Usability and Productivity in KDE land! We picked up a lot of great improvements to Discover, a much-requested change to allow Kate and Dolphin to be run with the root user account again, and quite a lot of important bugfixes.

  • A Progression of Drawing Devices

    Some time ago, I compared 2:1 devices, which was a new form factor back then. This time, triggered by an experiment with a Wacom Mobile Studio Pro during the last Krita sprint, I want to look into the various drawing devices I’ve used over the years, and which ones worked well, or not.

  • Other People’s Work

    Most of my writing on this blog is about FreeBSD, KDE, or Calamares. So it gives a bit of a one-sided view of what I do. There’s lots of pictures of rhubarb crumble, for instance, that never see the bloggy light-of-day. But I can build more than just software! Two months ago an unusually heavy storm blew down part of the fence in my back yard, which wasn’t really good for the privacy of that yard.

  • Not just Krita at the 2018 Krita Sprint

    At the 2018 Krita Sprint we had a special guest: Valeriy Malov, the maintainer of the Plasma Wacom tablet settings module. We’ve asked him to write about his experience at the sprint, so over to him!

    Hello,

    This is my Krita 2018 sprint report and general report / pre-release announcement for new version of wacomtablet.

  • Bringing slow motion to Pitivi

    Last year, I worked on the project ‘Pitivi: Color correction interface using three chromatic wheels’ as part of my Google Summer of Code. This year again, I’m working on Pitivi under the GNOME organisation. Mathieu Duponchellle and Thibault Saunier are mentoring my project this time.

  • Input Event Handling in Nautilus

    Gestures like these is now how almost all input is handled in Nautilus. The exception is the stuff that has no event controller counterpart in GTK+ 3.

    This summer I’m working on porting Nautilus to GTK+ 4 as part of Google Summer of Code, and I’ve spent the entirety of the time on getting rid of deprecated 3.x API and obsolete ways of handling events. Despite slightly hack-ish ways of working around deprecations, it’s been smooth sailing so far – No Regressions™! Almost ready to switch†!

GNOME: Project of the Week, Room Directory, Pitivi and Bug Tracking versus User Support

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GNOME
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: GNOME

    The GNOME Foundation says the move to GitLab will help improve workflow and tools as well as support, grow and collaborate with other free software communities. The GNOME project consists of more than 400 software projects and about 900 annual contributors.

    The foundation recently announced GNOME 3 with an activities overview to view basic tasks; new productivity features such as search and side-by-side; updated messaging system; performance enhancements; and the ability to access all your data in one place.

  • Improving the performance of the room directory

    For now, when we are searching for rooms with the “Default Servers” option, we are requesting 10 rooms from the homeserver for each protocol (by “protocol”, I mean non-Matrix protocols that are bridged to the user’s home servers, like IRC, Gitter, Slack, etc…) that is bridged to the homeserver. This can be quite slow. For instance, we are fetching about 100 rooms from the homeserver “matrix.org” even if we would need to show to the user only 20 of them. This is really bad regarding the performance of the application, furthermore because we have to download/generate the avatar of each room loaded.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi

    I will be working on Pitivi as my Google Summer of Code 2018 project under GNOME. One of the major task in my project is to integrate the current Welcome dialog box of Pitivi into it’s main window and display projects in a more informative, discoverable, and user friendly layout.

    Currently when Pitivi starts, a Welcome dialog appears that displays the recent projects and some buttons for creating a new project, browsing projects, etc. This dialog box needs to be integrated into the main window.

  • Engineering Journals vs User Support

    A major thanks to everyone involved in the gitlab migration. It’s no doubted a huge leap forward for GNOME on so many fronts.

    Before we lose that momentum, I’d like to bring up in the collective minds of our project, what I consider, a separate problem. That is Bug Tracking versus User Support.

    [...]

    We generally don’t have this focus in F/OSS. It requires a set of skills that many of us have not cultivated and probably should. In addition, we should encourage those that already have these skills to join us.

    But that raises the question: is gitlab the right place to do user support?

    If GNOME were to advance Free Software by taking user support to the next level, what would that look like and what tooling do we need? Is that worth investing in now that we have many applications to support in addition to the desktop plumbing?

    Hopefully we can have some discussion about that on the beach in Almería, Spain for GUADEC 2018.

GNOME: GUADEC, Fractal and GSoC

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GNOME
  • GUADEC under the sea

    I’m planning to do a day trip to go scuba diving at GUADEC this year. If you’d like to join me, drop me an email or find me on IRC. There’s a few of us interested in going, so the more, the better! This is not an official GUADEC event.

  • Redesigning the room directory of Fractal

    I have been working on the redesign of the room directory since I finished my first task. In this article, I will talk about the room directory (how it works and which improvements was needed), what I have done to improve it and some of the issues that are yet to be solved.

  • Fractal: a GNOME Matrix chat client

    Matrix is a protocol for decentralized instant messaging that has recently grown in popularity. Matrix can be used for a wide range of communication tasks, such as group chats, video chats, sharing files, and bridging to existing IRC rooms. One of the easiest ways to use Matrix is the RiotIM web client or desktop application. However, Fractal is a Matrix desktop application designed for GNOME, so it arguably feels a lot more at home on Fedora Workstation, as seen here:

  • [Old] How I got drawn into GSoC 2018?
  • [Old] Simple and robust algorithm for video thumbnail generation

    The simplest algorithm that comes to mind for generating a thumbnail for a video is to randomly pick a frame in the video (even simpler could be to just pick the first frame of the video). While the algorithm is very intuitive and looks good at first glance, it has one problem – it can pick a monotonous frame, like an all black frame, which obviously is not a good thumbnail because it doesn’t convey any information regarding the video.

    A good heuristic algorithm (referred from this stackoverflow post) to tackle this problem is to select a few random frames (let say, 5) in the video and pick the frame that has largest file size as video thumbnail – the idea being that the JPEG of a monotonous frame will compress into much smaller file than that of an interesting frame (one with lots of objects and colors).

  • A summer with GNOME

    Within just a few days, I fell in love with the simplicity of the code and the very supportive community of GNOME. My mentors, Ardien Plazas and Abhinav Singh were especially helpful and helped me get on track, by closely watching them handle the code with utmost care and simplicity, it quickly began apparent to me that more than developing a software, they were developing an art. I promptly began to understand the codebase and fix bugs as fast as I could. Encouraged by my friend, Sagar and already in love with GNOME Games, I applied for GSoC.

GNOME: Fractal, PulseAudio, GStreamer

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GNOME
  • Fractal GSoC Progress

    In the last two weeks I have been working on the user account settings for Fractal. I can’t wait to get to the point where Fractal will work stand-alone without needing to use Riot for certain things, and getting complete account settings is a major step in that direction.

  • Meet Tanu Kaskinen, PulseAudio maintainer

    Hello, my name is Tanu Kaskinen and I’m a PulseAudio maintainer (and also involved in the OpenEmbedded project a little bit). I spent my childhood in Järvenpää, Finland, and moved to Tampere when I started my software engineering studies at Tampere University of Technology. I’ve been living here ever since (13 years, if my calculations are correct).

  • GStreamer Spring 2018 Hackfest Remarks – author’s note

    Had the pleasure to attend the GStramer Spring Hackfest taking place between May 6 – May 4 in Lund Sweden, here follow some reflections.

    There likely no overstatement that multimedia development is probably one of the more complex areas of software development so to be present while what must be some of the more competent in the domain hacking was quite an experience.

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • A Quick Look At What's Coming To KDE Connect
  • Second week of coding phase, GSoC'18

    The week was totally involved in developing QML APIs similar to WebExtension APIs.

  • Shadows in Window Screenshots

    Every few months there is a review about Plasma by dedoimedo and one critic point is that screenshots include the shadow. As I’m rather annoyed of these complaints about this I’m now doing a blog post to explain the situation so that in future this can be skipped.

    Shadows in the screenshots are not a bug, but an intended feature. It was implemented by me in 2010 on request by Nuno Pinheiro, our Oxygen god. Before screenshots did not support shadows and looked really, really bad as the window decorations are round and contained black corners. Shadows were part of the design and that was completely lacking. So we came up with a rather decent solution on how to screenshot the window with shadows included. I first mentioned this new effect in this blog post from August 2010.

  • Summary of my first two weeks at GSoC
  • Five or More Modernisation Overview

    Before jumping right into the Five or More implementation plan and details, I would like to keep you updated with the progress made thus far.

    I started working on some project-related tasks during the community bonding period, to cover up for the upcoming exam and research session and any other time frame in which I might not be as active as I would like to. Also, during this period, I had a previously announced one week trip, which kept me from working more on the project.

    [...]

    Then, I intend to create a basic Vala app and window based on the template generated by GNOME Builder, only using the UI file that already exists in the Five or More repository. If everything goes as planned, I will start adding one component at a time in the short run, starting with the application menu, the callbacks for the UI buttons, the preferences window, the score and the preview widgets, and lastly, the game area.

  • LAS @ GiNA Planning + GNOME 3.26 Release Party in SF

    GNOME in North America (this isn’t official, but it’s the name we’re proposing for the event in North America that is a consolidation of the Boston Summit and the West Coast Summit)

Thoughts on Flatpak after four months of Epiphany Technology Preview

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

It’s been four months since I announced Epiphany Technology Preview — which I’ve been using as my main browser ever since — and five months since I announced the availability of a stable channel via Flatpak. For the most part, it’s been a good experience. Having the latest upstream development code for everything is wonderful and makes testing very easy. Any user can painlessly download and install either the latest stable version or the bleeding-edge development version on any Linux system, regardless of host dependencies, either via a couple clicks in GNOME Software or one command in the terminal. GNOME Software keeps it updated, so I always have a recent version. Thanks to this, I’m often noticing problems shortly after they’re introduced, rather than six months later, as was so often the case for me in the past. Plus, other developers can no longer complain that there’s a problem with my local environment when I report a bug they can’t reproduce, because Epiphany Technology Preview is a canonical distribution environment, a ground truth of sorts.

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GNOME Foundation to Receive $1M from Anonymous Donor over Next Two Years

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GNOME

The donation was made by an anonymous person, though the money will be received by the GNOME Foundation over the next couple of years. Honored by this gesture, the team pledges to use the money to hire more developers and streamline their operations to improve the GNOME desktop environment.

"We are honored by the trust given to us and will work hard to justify that trust. This particular donation will enable us to support the GNOME project more widely, and tackle key challenges that the free software community faces," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director of GNOME Foundation.

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Openwashing

Review: Peppermint OS 9

While I have to admit that I am not the target audience for a distribution focused on web-based applications, I found Peppermint 9 to be a solid distribution. Despite pulling components from multiple desktop environments, Peppermint 9's desktop is well integrated and easy to use. It was also easy to add both web-based and traditional applications to the system, so the distribution can be adjusted for users who prefer either. Peppermint 9 is not for everyone, but users who do most their work in Google Docs or Microsoft Office Online should give Peppermint a try. However, users accustomed to using traditional desktop applications might want to stick to one of the many alternatives out there. Yes, Peppermint 9 can be easily adjusted to use traditional desktop applications, but many of the other distribution options out there come with those kinds of applications pre-installed. Read more

A Major GNOME Icon Redesign is Getting Underway

Your favourite GNOME applications will soon have dramatically different icons. GNOME devs are redesigning the default icons for all GNOME core apps as part a wider overhaul of GNOME design guidelines. The move hope to make it easier (and less effort) for app developers to provide high-quality and useful icons for their software on the GNOME desktop. Not that this redesign is much a surprise, as the Adwaita folder icons we highlighted a few weeks back suggested a new tack was being taken on design. With the GNOME desktop environment shipping on the Purism Librem 5 smartphone, the timing of this revamp couldn’t be better. Read more

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