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GNOME

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Gets First Point Release, It's Ready for Mass Deployment

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GNOME

GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of the open source desktop environment used by default in numerous GNU/Linux distributions, including the Ubuntu, Fedora, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and others. It was officially released last month on March 14, but it usually takes a couple of weeks for it to land in the stable software repositories of these distros.

This usually happens when the first point release is out, GNOME 3.28.1 in this case, which was announced a few moments ago by Javier Jardón of the GNOME Release Team via an email announcement on Friday, noting the fact that the GNOME 3.28.1 packages should arrive shortly in the repositories of your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

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Also: GNOME 3.28.1 Released With Several Refinements

Awesome GNOME extensions for developers

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GNOME

Extensions add immense flexibility to the GNOME 3 desktop environment. They give users the advantage of customizing their desktop while adding ease and efficiency to their workflow. The Fedora Magazine has already covered some great desktop extensions such as EasyScreenCast, gTile, and OpenWeather. This article continues that coverage by focusing on extensions tailored for developers.

If you need assistance installing GNOME extensions, refer to the article How to install a GNOME Shell extension.

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Also: Free software desktops to 2020 & beyond

System76 becomes GNOME Foundation Advisory Board member

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GNOME

System76 has long been a huge champion of both Linux and open source. If you aren't familiar, the company sells premium computers running the Ubuntu operating system. Recently, the company decided to create its own Ubuntu-based distro called "Pop!_OS" which uses the GNOME desktop environment.

Today, the Denver, Colorado-based System76 takes its commitment to GNOME even further by becoming a Foundation Advisory Board member. It joins other respected companies on the board such as Google, Red Hat, and Canonical to name a few.

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KDE and GNOME: Offline Vaults, AtCore, KDE Connect and Nautilus

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KDE
GNOME
  • Offline Vaults for an extra layer of protection

    I’m slowly returning to KDE development after a few months of being mostly in bugfix mode due to my other-life obligations (more on that later), so I decided to implement a new feature for my youngest project – the Plasma Vault.

    One of the possible attack vectors to your Plasma Vaults is that people could potentially have access to your computer while the vault is open.

    This is not a problem if we consider direct access because it is something that is easily controlled – you see everyone who approaches your computer, but the problem can be remote access.

  • [AtCore] April progress update

    It has been over a month since my last progress update. Here is what I’ve done.

  • KDE Connect desktop 1.3 released
  • KDE Connect 1.3 Gets An Extension For GNOME's Nautilus

    KDE Connect is the nifty KDE project providing allowing communication between your Linux desktop computer and your Android smartphone/tablet via a secure communication protocol. KDE Connect 1.3 is now the latest feature release.

    KDE Connect already allows functionality like viewing/replying to messages from your desktop, sending browser links to your phone, and other data synchronization abilities. With GNOME not having any compelling alternative to KDE Connect, today's v1.3 release adds in a Nautilus extension that allows users to send files to their phone from the GNOME file manager's context menu.

  • Proposal to add an Action-Info Bar to Nautilus

    We are looking into adding an action & info bar to Nautilus. The background about this proposal can be read on the task where we put the main goals, prior art, different proposals and mockups, etc.

    We are not sure whether this is the appropriate solution and whether the implementation we propose is ideal. In order to be more confident, we would like to gather early feedback on the current proposal. Also, we are looking for ideas on how to improve the overall approach.

    The current proposal is being worked in a branch and can be installed via Flatpak clicking here (Note: You might need to install it the the CLI by executing `flatpak install nautilus-dev.flatpak` due to a bug in Software).

12 Best GTK Themes for Ubuntu and other Linux Distributions

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GNOME

For those of us that use Ubuntu proper, the move from Unity to Gnome as the default desktop environment has made theming and customizing easier than ever. Gnome has a fairly large tweaking community, and there is no shortage of fantastic GTK themes for users to choose from. With that in mind, I went ahead and found some of my favorite themes that I have come across in recent months. These are what I believe offer some of the best experiences that you can find.

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Tumbleweed/KDE and GNOME/GTK

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KDE
GNOME
  • Tumbleweed Starts Week with Plasma, DigiKam Updates
  • Community Data Analytics: Now in Technicolor!

    So let's revisit our "whole year 2017 for all of KDEPIM" (that is the parts in KDE Applications, in Extragear and in Playground) with more colors!

    Firstly, this gives us the weekly activity using the "Magma" palette and a linear interpolation of the colors between the minimum and maximum commit counts...

    [...]

    This time we don't even need to zoom in to spot the code KDEPIM contributors in 2017. With the color coding, we see right away again that Laurent Montel, Daniel Vratil and Volker Krause are the core contributors. It's much less guess work than the last time, we're backed by the color coded centrality metric now. We can also better see that Allen Winter, Sandro Knauß and David Faure are very central too, something that we missed the last time.

  • Canta Is An Amazing Material Design GTK Theme

    Canta is a complete Material Design theme. It uses pastel colors in a beautiful blend, with round buttons, tabs, and corners. Subtle, unobtrusive transparency is used sporadically, giving Canta a stylish look.

Diplomatic Munity - Lethal Gnome 2

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GNOME

Several things: MATE 1.20 looks way better on Bionic than my early test. A little bit of customization goes a long way, and there's still more room for improvement. Then, Munity, with its Dash and HUD and whatnot, is a smart and practical nod toward Ubuntu and Unity, and it's way better than Gnome 3. Brings MATE up to modern levels, and it easily achieves parity.

I am quite happy with what MATE is going to bring us, and the 18.04 LTS test might actually prove to be a very sensible and fun distro, with goodies, practicality, speed, and efficiency blended into one compact and solid package. Bugs are to be ironed, for they are Devil's work, and MATE can benefit from extra bling bling. But then, from a bland sub-performer to a nifty desktop, with tons of options and features. Takes some fiddling, and not everything is easily discoverable, but the road to satisfaction is a fairly short and predictable one. Munity is a cool, cool idea, and I'm looking forward to Bionic's official release. Take care.

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‘Dash to Dock’ Adds New Launcher Styles, Support for GNOME 3.28

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GNOME

An updated version of Dash to Dock, the hugely popular GNOME Shell extension, is available to download.

Dash to Dock v63 adds support for the recent GNOME 3.28 release. This means those of you on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Fedora 27 and other Linux distributions can rock out with your dock out — sans any compatibility issues.

But naturally there’s more to this latest release than a version bump.

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Also: The LVFS CDN will change soon

ED Update – Week 14

Update on KDE Development and GNOME Recipes Hackfest

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KDE
GNOME
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 12

    Welcome to week 12 in Usability & Productivity! Despite all the awesome improvements I’m about to share, there are EVEN MORE that I wasn’t able to announce this week because they’re not quite done yet! But In the coming weeks, some very nice fixes and improvements are going to land.

  • Recipes hackfest and joining Endless

    On a side note, this was my first week at Endless. The onboarding experience is great and I am very excited about Endless in general. Special thanks to Cosimo Cecchi who guided me all through the process. Delighted to start my career at a great FLOSS-oriented company!

That Huge GNOME Shell Memory Leak? It’s Being Fixed

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GNOME

Some good news: the (rather large) GNOME Shell memory leak we spotlighted last week is in the process of being fixed.

GNOME developers have spent the past week or so trying to identify the root of the issue, which causes system memory usage to increase each minute GNOME Shell is used.

Following our report hundreds of GNOME Shell users across various Linux distros took to internet forums and social media to confirm the memory creep issue exists on their systems.

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Also: Maps, Gitlab, and Meson

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More in Tux Machines

Blockchain and Hyperledger/FOSS

  • American Express Integrates Blockchain To Its Membership Rewards Program
    Financial services corporation American Express (AmEx) has announced a blockchain application to its Membership Rewards program in partnership with online merchant Boxed, Associated Press reported May 23. AmEx announced that it is integrating blockchain technology developed by Hyperledger, an open source blockchain project under the Linux Foundation, to let merchants design customized offers for AmEx cardholders in order to increase customer engagement.
  • Interview: Riccardo Spagni co-founder of a new open source blockchain
    South African cryptocurrency expert and lead maintainer of the Monero project Riccardo “fluffypony” Spagni has co-founded a new open source blockchain protocol named Tari. Tari is being built as a blockchain protocol for managing, transferring, and using digital assets, and is stewarded by a team based in Johannesburg. The Johannesburg-based team will work on building a blockchain protocol as a second-layer solution on top of Monero, leveraging the existing cryptocurrency’s security while offering a scalable and dynamic platform for digital assets.
  • CheapAir Ditches BitPay For Open-Source Bitcoin Payments
    Travel and accommodation website CheapAir.com has appeared to choose self-hosted payment processor BTCPay for its Bitcoin payments, shunning industry stalwart BitPay. [...] Coinbase revealed it was retiring its merchant processing function in April, a move which the cryptocurrency industry condemned for its disruptive consequences. BitPay, a processor which along with Coinbase continues to be arguably the best-known option for Bitcoin payments, appeared to miss out on wooing CheapAir, meanwhile, which has offered Bitcoin since 2014 and was the first ever travel agency world-wide to accept bitcoin.
  • Ontology (ONT) Develops its Open-source Triones Consensus System economic model
    The Ontology (ONT) team uses the blockchain technology and the Internet to explore in-depth levels of the information industry. The team’s plans include developing an open-source distributed trust ecosystem called Triones Consensus System that’s based on the Ontology chain network.

Linux 4.16.12, 4.14.44, 4.9.103, 4.4.133, and 3.18.110

Wine 3.9 Released

Mozilla: WebAssembly, Mozilla Test Pilot, VR and Bootstrap

  • Testing GNU FreeDink in your browser
    This is a first version that can be polished further but it works quite well. This is the original C/C++/SDL2 code with a few tweaks, cross-compiled to WebAssembly (and an alternate version in asm.js) with emscripten. Nothing brand new I know, but things are getting smoother, and WebAssembly is definitely a performance boost. I like distributed and autonomous tools, so I'm generally not inclined to web-based solutions. In this case however, this is a local version of the game. There's no server side. Savegames are in your browser local storage. Even importing D-Mods (game add-ons) is performed purely locally in the in-memory virtual FS with a custom .tar.bz2 extractor cross-compiled to WebAssembly.
  • Welcome Punam to the Test pilot team!
    A couple months ago Punam transferred from another team at Mozilla to join the Test Pilot team. Below she answers some questions about her experience and what she’s looking forward to. Welcome, Punam! [...] Before Mozilla I have worked with SonicWall, eBay and Symantec doing web development.
  • This week in Mixed Reality: Issue 7
    Missed us last week? Our team met in Chicago for a work week. If you had the chance to come and meet us at the CHIVR / AR Chicago meetup, thanks for swinging by. We strategized our short and long term plans and we're really excited to share what we're unfolding in the coming weeks.
  • Why bootstrap?
    Over the next few quarters, I'm going to focus my attention on Mozilla's experimentation platform. One of the first questions we need to answer is how we're going to calculate and report the necessary measures of variance. Any experimentation platform needs to be able to compare metrics between two groups. For example, say we're looking at retention for a control and experiment group. Control shows a retention of 88.45% and experiment shows a retention of 90.11%. Did the experimental treatment cause a real increase in retention or did the experiment branch just get lucky when we assigned users? We need to calculate some measure of variance to be able to decide. The two most common methods to do this calculation are the frequentist's two-sample t-test or some form of the bootstrap. In ye olden days, we'd be forced to use the two-sample t-test. The bootstrap requires a lot of compute power that just wasn't available until recently. As you can imagine, the bootstrap is all the rage in the Data Science world. Of course it is. We get to replace statistics with raw compute power! That's the dream!