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GNOME

GNOME On Wayland Is No Longer Frustratingly Slow With ASpeed Graphics

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GNOME

GNOME 3.32 fixes a frustrating issue if you have tried using GNOME on Wayland (or even just the GDM log-in manager with Wayland) while running on ASpeed graphics as is common to many workstation/server boards: it's no longer horrendously slow.

After multi-monitor GNOME Wayland performance issues, by far my second biggest issue with GNOME's Wayland session has been the horrific performance when GNOME starts up the Wayland session due to ASpeed having a KMS driver. The rendering gets punted over to LLVMpipe with ASpeed just providing display hardware, but it's been an absolutely awful user experience. Whenever occasionally having GNOME on one of the many workstation/server boxes having ASpeed to drive the display, it's been a disaster... Even the time it takes to update the screen following keyboard input has been lengthy, let alone mouse movements.

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Ubuntu/Gnome on a tablet

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The ExoPC is a tablet device from Intel with regular Intel Atom x86 processor, 2 GB RAM, a 64 GB SSD, 2 USB ports, touch screen etc. Not a high-end tablet by today’s specs, but it was pretty nice back in 2013 when it came out. It is still a decent piece of hardware, and not the least because all of the device drivers for it can be found in the mainline Linux kernel and therefore Ubuntu 18.04 installed on it works fully out-of-the-box as expected.

Installation is easy. Just boot the tablet with a USB installation drive inserted, and during the boot press the “BBS” icon and start the installation and the rest is familiar to anybody who has installed Ubuntu before. An external keyboard connected via USB is helpful during the process though.

All of the hardware is detected as one would expect. WLAN works, camera works, sound, microphone and everything else we tested works. Even the rotation sensor works and the screen turns around as the tablet physically rotates. Since the tablet is very old, the experience is a bit sluggish though.

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Turn GNOME to Heaven With These 23 GNOME Extensions

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GNOME

GNOME Shell is one of the most used desktop interfaces on the Linux desktop. It’s part of the GNOME project and is considered to be the next generation of the old classic GNOME 2.x interface. GNOME Shell was first released in 2011 carrying a lot of features, including GNOME Shell extensions feature.

GNOME Extensions are simply extra functionality that you can add to your interface, they can be panel extensions, performance extensions, quick access extensions, productivity extensions or for any other type of usage. They are all free and open source of course; you can install them with a single click from your web browser actually.

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Best Gnome distro of 2018

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GNU
Linux
GNOME

We talked about Xfce. We talked about Plasma. ‘Twas a turbulent year, and yet, it didn’t really have any defining Linux moments. More sort of steady state, stuck in the middle of a prolonged identity crisis where both the desktop and Linux are struggling to find innovation. Now we ought to talk about Gnome, the third of the triumvirate. What be the best distro of 2018 wearing the Gnome desktop environment cape?

Last year, I wasn’t really impressed with what Gnome had to offer. Following a brief spike in hope from the year earlier, this particular desktop environment settled into a pattern of inaccessible defaults and high resource usage, making it rather unsuitable for everyday use. Sure you can adapt it and tweak it, but then there are better, more elegant choices out there. Let’s see what happened in 2018 – and remember, it’s Gnome only, so we won’t be discussing the likes of Linux Mint or Deepin. After me.

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How to install the GNOME Desktop on Ubuntu Server 18.04

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GNOME
Ubuntu
HowTos

So you have your Ubuntu Server 18.04 instance up and running, and you're beaming with pride. However, no matter how much you stare at it, you realize you've spent the majority of your IT admin life using a GUI, and you're not quite sure what to do next? If that describes you, you'll be glad to know that you can install a handy GUI on that Ubuntu Server. In fact, this task can be done quite easily.

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Seville Fractal Hackfest Report

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GNOME
  • Seville Fractal Hackfest Report

    Last week I was in Seville, Spain for our second Fractal Hackfest this year. This time it was organized by Daniel Garica Moreno, and held on the University of Seville campus. It was a small event with mostly core developers, focused on driving forward the backend changes and refactoring needed to make our future plans (end-to-end and the app split) possible. We also had some local newcomers join (shoutout to Alejandro Domínguez).

  • Fractal hackfest in Seville

    Thanks to a sponsorship from the GNOME Foundation, I was able to go and share an appartment with Tobias and Julian. Sadly other existing contributors were not able to attend, but we had the pleasant surprise of having two local students who participated. Alejandro even got a couple commits merged in master during the event. We also got to spend some time with a few local Free Software people.

    We did a lot of testing to get a good feel for the current state, and rounded off a few sharp edges with quick fixes. I also spent some time figuring out what still remained to be done before we could release. I proposed some improvements to our review process, the way we share development best practices, and brought home quite a few todo items.

24 Excellent GNOME Extensions

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GNOME

Freedom of choice is a central plank of open source software, and it’s very relevant when choosing and configuring a desktop environment. One of Linux’s best features is its modularity.

Extensibility relates to the ability to customize a desktop environment to an individual’s preferences and tastes. This flexibility is offered by themes, extensions, and applets.

GNOME ships with a System Settings tool which isn’t as diverse as some of its peers. There’s still useful options such as a simple way to enable remote access and file sharing. If you’re serious about customizing GNOME, you’ll need the GNOME Tweaks utility. It’s not an official GNOME app, but it offers some advanced tinkering. But when it comes to micro-configuring the GNOME desktop to your preference, Tweaks still leaves us asking for more. Fortunately, there’s an awesome range of extensions that provide additional functionality.

Here’s our recommended GNOME shell extensions. Most of the extensions are not officially supported by GNOME. But they all take the desktop to the next level, either by adding useful functionality, improving your workflow, or simply offering a touch of panache to the desktop. All the extensions all compatible with the latest release of GNOME. Naturally there’s only open source goodness on offer.

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Ubuntu and GNOME Leftovers

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Best 25 Ubuntu News Websites and Blogs

    Linux is an open-source operating system and Ubuntu is one of its very popular distros which is rapidly increasing its user base. With Linux and its distros, one can learn and do a lot of things. In simple words, Linux is an ocean of knowledge and endless opportunities. Many people reading this article will claim that they know everything about Linux and they are expert at Ubuntu but this is not the case because there are many things you don’t know about Linux.

    This article is dedicated to everyone using Ubuntu, right from the noobs to the Linux professionals. Today I am going to give you list of Top 25 Ubuntu news websites and blogs which you guys will find very helpful to learn more about Linux and its distros. The website listed here cover all the minor details such as How-to guides, news, tutorials and everything you need to know about Linux.

  • Monday 17th December 2018

    If you’re interested in discussing a topic please start a thread in the Desktop area of the Community Hub (this site).

    We also have our weekly meeting on IRC. We meet on Tuesday at 13:30 UTC in #ubuntu-desktop on Freenode. There will be an “Any Other Business” section at the end where you are welcome to raise topics. These topics might be discussed during the meeting, or afterwards depending on the time, depth of conversation, topic and so on.

  • Ubuntu's Dock CPU Usage To Be Lowered By A Third, Other Perf Fixes Inbound

    The GNOME-based Ubuntu desktop continues being tuned for better performance.

    Canonical's Daniel Van Vugt has shared his latest status update concerning all of his performance profiling and tuning work for the distribution's GNOME Shell based desktop.

  • Bring Back Desktop Icons on GNOME 3.30

    If you use GNOME 3.30 or later, you may find that 'icons on desktop' feature does not exist anymore. You cannot add anything to your personal Desktop folder like you usually did. Fortunately, thanks to csoriano, this removed feature can be added back by installing Desktop Icons  extension. You will find this extension useful if you use latest GNOME on Fedora, Arch, openSUSE, and Ubuntu if the Nautilus version is over 3.26. This article shows how it looks from openSUSE Tumbleweed GNOME. Try it and enjoy!

  • Fractal December'18 Hackfest (part 2)

    The Friday 14th was the last day of the second Fractal Hackfest. I've not spend much time writing real code, the Thursday was mainly another hacking day and I've been able to continue with the fractal-backend creation, but there's a lot of work to do there.

GNOME Development Leftovers

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GNOME
  • Nightly GNOME Apps and New Adwaita GTK Theme Run Through

    In this video, we are quickly looking at Nightly GNOME Apps and a sneak peek at New Adwaita GTK Theme.

  • Emmanuele Bassi: And I’m home

    Of course I couldn’t stay home playing video games, recording podcasts, and building gunplas forever, and so I had to figure out where to go to work next, as I do enjoy being able to have a roof above my head, as well as buying food and stuff. By a crazy random happenstance, the GNOME Foundation announced that, thanks to a generous anonymous donation, it would start hiring staff, and that one of the open positions was for a GTK developer. I decided to apply, as, let’s be honest, it’s basically the dream job for me. I’ve been contributing to GNOME components for about 15 years, and to GTK for 12; and while I’ve been paid to contribute to some GNOME-related projects over the years, it was always as part of non-GNOME related work.

    The hiring process was really thorough, but in the end I managed to land the most amazing job I could possibly hope for.

  • Opera Launches Built-in Cryptocurrency Wallet for Android, ManagedKube Partners with Google Cloud to Provide a Monitoring App for Kubernetes Cluster Costs, QEMU 3.1 Released, IoT DevCon Call for Presentations and GNOME 3.31.3 Is Out

    GNOME 3.31.3 is out, and this will be the last snapshot of 2018. Note that this is development code meant for testing and hacking purposes. For a list of changes, go here, and the source packages are here.

  • Firmware Attestation

    When fwupd writes firmware to devices, it often writes it, then does a verify pass. This is to read back the firmware to check that it was written correctly. For some devices we can do one better, and read the firmware hash and compare it against a previously cached value, or match it against the version published by the LVFS. This means we can detect some unintentional corruption or malicious firmware running on devices, on the assumption that the bad firmware isn’t just faking the requested checksum. Still, better than nothing.

    Any processor better than the most basic PIC or Arduino (e.g. even a tiny $5 ARM core) is capable of doing public/private key firmware signing. This would use standard crypto using X.509 keys or GPG to ensure the device only runs signed firmware. This protects against both accidental bitflips and also naughty behaviour, and is unofficial industry recommended practice for firmware updates. Older generations of the Logitech Unifying hardware were unsigned, and this made the MouseJack hack almost trivial to deploy on an unmodified dongle. Newer Unifying hardware requires a firmware image signed by Logitech, which makes deploying unofficial or modified firmware almost impossible.

  • Robert Ancell: Interesting things about the GIF image format
  • GIFs in GNOME
  • About ncurses Colors

    These colors go back to CGA, IBM's Color/Graphics Adapter from the earlier PC-compatible computers. This was a step up from the plain monochrome displays; as the name implies, monochrome could display only black or white. CGA could display a limited range of colors.

    CGA supports mixing red (R), green (G) and blue (Cool colors. In its simplest form, RGB is either "on" or "off". In this case, you can mix the RGB colors in 2x2x2=8 ways. Table 1 shows the binary and decimal representations of RGB.

GNOME 3.31.3 released

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GNOME

GNOME 3.31.3 is now available.

This will be our last snapshop before the year is over. Try it out,
test it, improve it.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.31.3, you can use the official
BuildStream project snapshot.

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Also: GNOME 3.31.3 Released As Another Step Towards GNOME 3.32

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Android Leftovers

Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!
    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and B), as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture). [...] As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific). Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

OSS: SVT-AV1, LibreOffice, FSF and Software Freedom Conservancy

  • SVT-AV1 Already Seeing Nice Performance Improvements Since Open-Sourcing
    It was just a few weeks ago that Intel open-sourced the SVT-AV1 project as a CPU-based AV1 video encoder. In the short time since publishing it, there's already been some significant performance improvements.  Since the start of the month, SVT-AV1 has added multi-threaded CDEF search, more AVX optimizations, and other improvements to this fast evolving AV1 encoder. With having updated the test profile against the latest state as of today, here's a quick look at the performance of this Intel open-source AV1 video encoder.
  • Find a LibreOffice community member near you!
    Hundreds of people around the world contribute to each new version of LibreOffice, and we’ve interviewed many of them on this blog. Now we’ve collected them together on a map (thanks to OpenStreetMap), so you can see who’s near you, and find out more!
  • What I learned during my internship with the FSF tech team
    Hello everyone, I am Hrishikesh, and this is my follow-up blog post concluding my experiences and the work I did during my 3.5 month remote internship with the FSF. During my internship, I worked with the tech team to research and propose replacements for their network monitoring infrastructure. A few things did not go quite as planned, but a lot of good things that I did not plan happened along the way. For example, I planned to work on GNU LibreJS, but never could find enough time for it. On the other hand, I gained a lot of system administration experience by reading IRC conversations, and by working on my project. I even got to have a brief conversation with RMS! My mentors, Ian, Andrew, and Ruben, were extremely helpful and understanding throughout my internship. As someone who previously had not worked with a team, I learned a lot about teamwork. Aside from IRC, we interacted weekly in a conference call via phone, and used the FSF's Etherpad instance for live collaborative editing, to take notes. The first two months were mostly spent studying the FSF's existing Nagios- and Munin-based monitoring and alert system, to understand how it works. The tech team provided two VMs for experimenting with Prometheus and Nagios, which I used throughout the internship. During this time, I also spent a lot of time reading about licenses, and other posts about free software published by the FSF.
  • We're Hiring: Techie Bookkeeper
    Software Freedom Conservancy is looking for a new employee to help us with important work that supports our basic operations. Conservancy is a nonprofit charity that promotes and improves free and open source software projects. We are home to almost 50 projects, including Git, Inkscape, Etherpad, phpMyAdmin, and Selenium (to name a few). Conservancy is the home of Outreachy, an award winning diversity intiative, and we also work hard to improve software freedom generally. We are a small but dedicated staff, handling a very large number of financial transactions per year for us and our member projects.

Security: Back Doors Running Amok, Container Runtime Flaw Patched, Cisco Ships Exploit Inside Products

  • Here We Go Again: 127 Million Accounts Stolen From 8 More Websites
    Several days ago, a hacker put 617 million accounts from 16 different websites for sale on the dark web. Now, the same hacker is offering 127 million more records from another eight websites.
  • Hacker who stole 620 million records strikes again, stealing 127 million more
    A hacker who stole close to 620 million user records from 16 websites has stolen another 127 million records from eight more websites, TechCrunch has learned. The hacker, whose listing was the previously disclosed data for about $20,000 in bitcoin on a dark web marketplace, stole the data last year from several major sites — some that had already been disclosed, like more than 151 million records from MyFitnessPal and 25 million records from Animoto. But several other hacked sites on the marketplace listing didn’t know or hadn’t disclosed yet — such as 500px and Coffee Meets Bagel. The Register, which first reported the story, said the data included names, email addresses and scrambled passwords, and in some cases other login and account data — though no financial data was included.
  • Vendors Issue Patches for Linux Container Runtime Flaw Enabling Host Attacks
  • How did the Dirty COW exploit get shipped in software?
    An exploit code for Dirty COW was accidentally shipped by Cisco with product software. Learn how this code ended up in a software release and what this vulnerability can do.