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GNOME

Top 20 GNOME Extensions You Should Be Using Right Now

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GNOME

The capacity of your GNOME desktop can be enhanced with extensions. Here is a list of the best GNOME extensions to save you the trouble of finding them on your own.
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KDE and GNOME: Qt 5.10.0 RC, Evolving KDE, and GNOME at London UX Hackfest

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KDE
GNOME
  • Qt 5.10 Release Candidate Arrives Late

    Qt 5.10 RC was expected back on 16 November but only this morning is making its debut.

    While arriving nearly two weeks late, The Qt Company is still hoping to get the official Qt 5.10.0 release out on time, which has been scheduled for 30 November. Thus there's basically two days left to get the release candidate tested if getting the release out on time.

  • Qt 5.10.0 RC out

    We are targeting to get final Qt 5.10.0 out 30.11.2017 as planned so please test the packages now & report me immediately if you find something which should really block the release. But remember: We won't block the release without really good reasons. Qt 5.10.1 will be released quite quickly so if we can live with issue as known issue in Qt 5.10.0 we will. So please add those issues directly in known issues page (https://wiki.qt.io/Qt_5.10.0_Known_Issues).

  • Evolving KDE – The goals are set!

    Since Akademy in Almería we have been going through the process of defining goals for KDE for the next 3 to 4 years. Different ideas were proposed and refined. 10 of them made it into the community-wide vote to select 3 of them. Today I am proud to announce the result based on the 684 submitted votes.

  • KDE's Goals For The Next 3~4 Years

    Since this year's KDE Akademy conference, KDE developers have been plotting their vision for the next few years and recently wrapped up voting on what should be their three main goals to focus on over the next few years.

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  • London UX Hackfest

    Thanks to the GNOME Foundation, a handful of designers and developers got together last week in London to refocus on the core element of the GNOME experience, the shell. Allan and Cassidy have already summed up everything in their well written blog posts, so I’d like to point to some pretty pictures and the video above.

Ubuntu 17.10: Return of the GNOME

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GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you've been following the Linux world at all, you know this has been an entire year for spring cleaning. Early in 2017, Canonical stopped work on its homegrown Unity desktop, Mir display server, and its larger vision of "convergence"—a unified interface for Ubuntu for phones, tablets, and desktops.

And now almost exactly six years after Ubuntu first switched from GNOME 2 to the Unity desktop, that has been dropped, too. The distro is back to GNOME, and Canonical recently released Ubuntu 17.10, a major update with some significant changes coming to the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

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Builder 3.27 Progress

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GNOME

We are a couple of months into Builder’s 3.28 development. We have fewer big ticket features scheduled this cycle when compared to 3.26. However that is replaced by a multitude of smaller features and details. Let’s take a look at some of what has been done already.

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Also: GNOME Builder Development Environment Picking Up Many Features For GNOME 3.28

Recommended GNOME Shell Extensions for Ubuntu 17.10

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GNOME
Ubuntu

This is a list of GNOME Shell Extensions (GSE) that are very useful for Ubuntu 17.10 users. Among them are NetSpeed (to show up/down speed), Dash to Panel (to combine all panels into single bottom panel), Datetime Format (to show complete day-date-clock at top panel), even EasyScreenCast (to record your desktop activity to video), and more. They are handy for many user's daily/repeating tasks, easy to install, and user-friendly to operate. Finally, I hope this recommendation article is useful for you.

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gThumb 3.6 GNOME Image Viewer Released with Better Wayland and HiDPI Support

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GNOME

gThumb, the open-source image viewer for the GNOME desktop environment, has been updated this week to version 3.6, a new stable branch that introduces numerous new features and improvements.

gThumb 3.6 comes with better support for the next-generation Wayland display server as the built-in video player, color profiles, and application icon received Wayland support. The video player component received a "Loop" button to allow you to loop videos, and there's now support for HiDPI displays.

The app also ships with a color picker, a new option to open files in full-screen, a zoom popover that offers different zoom commands and a zoom slider, support for double-click activation, faster image loading, aspect ratio filtering, and the ability to display the description of the color profile in the property view.

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Also: Many Broadway HTML5 Backend Improvements Land In GTK4

KDE and GNOME News

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KDE
GNOME
  • KDevelop 5.2 Open-Source IDE Released with Improved C++, PHP and Python Support

    KDevelop, the well-known open-source and cross-platform IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating system, has been updated recently to version 5.2.

    Almost half a year in the making, KDevelop 5.2 is a major release that introduces more analyzer plugins to the Analyzer menu entry implemented in the previous release, KDevelop 5.1. These include Heaptrack, a heap memory profiler for Linux apps written in C/C++ and Cppcheck, a popular static analyzer for the C++ programming language, which can be used from inside KDevelop by default.

  • Kubuntu Most Wanted

    Kubuntu Cafe Live, is our new community show. This new format show is styled using a magazine format. We created lots of space for community involvement, breaking the show into multiple segments, and we want to get you involved. We are looking for Presenters, Trainers, Writers and Hosts.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 RELEASED

    GNOME 3.27.2, the second unstable release in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available.

    The porting of more modules to meson continues (which is great!), but It's still causing some problems for some modules. See the build failures below, along with a short list of other build errors.

  • GNOME 3.27.2 Released: More Meson Porting, Nautilus Starring Files

    GNOME 3.27.2 is now available as the second development release in the road to next March's GNOME 3.28 desktop stable update.

  • Epiphany 3.27.2 Improves GNOME Web Apps, Firefox Sync

    Epiphany 3.27.2 is now available as the latest web browser release in the road to next year's GNOME 3.28 desktop.

    One of the big changes with this Epiphany browser development release is restructuring how "web apps" are handled. They are now treated more like "silos, rather than prisons." This bug report describes more of the reworking of these GNOME Web Apps. The updated implementation allows these web applications to support tabs, allowing external links, button changes, and more.

The Road to the GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Continues, Second Snapshot Is Out

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GNOME

The GNOME 3.27.2 unstable snapshot was announced a few moments ago by Tristan Van Berkom of the GNOME Release Team via an email announcement, which informs us that several more components of the GNOME Stack have been ported to the Meson build system, though some of them are failing to build for now.

These include the GNOME Chess, GNOME Documents, GNOME Boxes, GNOME Terminal, GNOME Software, GNOME System Monitor, and fwupd. However, GNOME 3.27.2 includes many updated apps, such as the recently released NetworkManager 1.10.0, and brings various improvements to the Epiphany web browser and other apps.

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Software: Papis, Cozy, OpenShot, NeuVector, Latte Dock and More

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KDE
Software
GNOME
  • Papis – A Command-line Based Document And Bibliography Manager

    A while ago, we wrote about Mendeley – an academic social network for researchers and educators. Using Mendeley, the researchers, lecturers, educators and librarians can connect with each other, share data, discuss ideas about their research, follow inspirational researchers around the world, collaborate and lots more. Today, we are going to discuss yet another useful tool for research scholars. Meet Papis, a powerful and highly extensible command-line based document and bibliography manager. Unlike Mendeley, Papis is not just for a particular research community but for every one who wants to manage their documents easily and effectively. Also, you can retain the full ownership to your data, because all data will be stored in your local drive.

  • Linux Audiobook Player ‘Cozy’ Adds Sleep Timer, m4a Support

    Cozy, the open-source audiobook player for Linux desktop, has a new version out. The app adds a sleep timer and improves the interface.

  • OpenShot 2.4.1 Released with Various Improvements

    A new version of the OpenShot video editor is available to download.

    OpenShot 2.4.1 follows a stability-focused release of the non-linear editor made back in September.

    Among the big changes OpenShot 2.4.1 features is improved image quality. You should now see sharper images in the preview window when editing thanks to an “improved image processing pipeline”.

    There’s also improved playback smoothness when working with high frame-rate videos at 50fps, 60fps, and 120fps.

  • NeuVector 1.3 Boosts Container Security with Improved Threat Detection

    Security startup NeuVector announced version 1.3 of its container security platform on Nov.13, providing advanced capabilities to help organizations detect threats that can be hidden in container workloads.

    NeuVector's platform provides a container firewall that can filter application layer traffic to help identify anomalous behavior and traffic. Among the new features in the NeuVector 1.3 release, is the ability to get visibility into tunnelled traffic, as well as advanced privilege escalation detection capabilities. NeuVector is also expanding its portfolio with an enhanced enterprise edition that provides additional capabilities.

  • Latte Dock v0.7.2 arrives in KDE and Kubuntu backports PPA

    Latte Dock, the very popular doc/panel app for Plasma Desktop, has released its new bugfix version 0.7.2. This is also the first stable release since Latte Dock became an official KDE project at the end of August.

  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.2

    Latte Dock v0.7.2 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements!

  • Interview with Lars Pontoppidan

    I’d like to thank everyone involved with Krita for making this great open source and free software available to the world. I hope to soon get enough time on my hands to help the project grow.

  • GNOME Shell 4 Proposal Published To Be More Wayland-Focused

    Jonas Adahl of Red Hat has volleyed his initial proposals for how a "future" GNOME Shell could be architected on a page entitled GNOME Shell 4. This GNOME Shell 4 would potentially break compatibility with GNOME Shell 3 extensions while being more designed around Wayland rather than X11.

    GNOME Shell 3 started out as an X11 compositing manager and has then been fitted for Wayland and other modern input/display features on Linux. With GNOME Shell 4, it would be more of a Wayland-first design and perhaps we could see it do away with X11/X.Org support entirely.

    The new GNOME Shell would be better fitted for low-latency input forwarding, low-latency visual input event feedback (namely pointer cursors), low-latency/zero-copy client forwarding, input methods within the shell UI, and eliminating stalls on the main compositor thread during frame redraws.

GNOME: Builder, LibreOffice, Outreachy 2017

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GNOME
  • Code indexing in Builder

    Anoop, one of Builder’s GSoC students this past summer, put together a code-index engine built upon Builder’s fuzzy search algorithm. It shipped with support for C and C++. Shortly after the 3.27 cycle started, Patrick added support for GJS. Today I added support for Vala which was rather easy given the other code we have in Builder.

  • Simplifying contributions

    Every release of both GNOME and Builder, we try to lower the barrier a bit more for new contributions. Bastian mentioned to me at GUADEC that we could make things even simpler from the Builder side of things. After a few mockups, I finally found some time to start implementing it.

  • gtk3 + broadway + libreoffice

    Out of the box in Fedora 26 I see that our gtk3 version of LibreOffice mostly works under broadway so here's libreoffice displaying through firefox. Toolbar is toast, but dialogs and menus work.

  • Outreachy 2017 Participants Selected For Winter 2017 Open-Source Work

    The Outreachy participants for the Winter 2017 internship program for "underrepresented people in tech" have been named.

    There are 42 interns that were selected for the internship period running from December to March. The selected women and other underrepresented groups in the Linux/open-source world will be working on items including...

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox 58

  • Latest Firefox Quantum release available with faster, always-on privacy with opt-in Tracking Protection and new features
    We accept things in the online world that we wouldn’t accept in the physical one. For instance, how would you feel if you popped your head in a store and that store now had the ability to keep sending you flyers even if you didn’t buy anything? Online, we often visit sites that track us, but it isn’t clear when this is happening or how the information is being used. Adding insult to injury, this often invisible tracking actually slows down web pages.
  • Firefox 58 Arrives With Continued Speed Optimizations
    Mozilla has set free Firefox 58.0 today as their latest "Firefox Quantum" release that continues work on being a performant web browser.
  • Firefox Quantum 58 builds on performance gains, improves screenshots tool
    Mozilla is rolling out Firefox Quantum 58.0 for desktop, along with Firefox for Android 58.0. It arrives over two months after the landmark release of Firefox Quantum 57.0. The latest build focuses on performance and security, while an update to Firefox’s user profile feature means it’s no longer backwards compatible with previous versions. Android users also gain the ability to pin favorite websites to their home screen for use like native apps.
  • Firefox 58 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows
    The Mozilla Foundation has made Firefox 58 files available for download on its official FTP servers. An official announcement will be made later today when the organization will also release the final changelog.
  • Browse without baggage in Firefox: Set Tracking Protection to always on
    We just can’t stop making Firefox faster — and with our most recent release, we also made it easier for you to control how much you’re tracked.
  • Firefox 58: The Quantum Era Continues
    2017 was a big year for Mozilla, culminating in the release of Firefox Quantum, a massive multi-year re-tooling of the browser focused on speed, and laying the groundwork for the years to come. In 2018, we’ll build on that incredible foundation, and in that spirit our next several releases will continue to bear the Quantum moniker. Let’s take a look at some of the new goodies that Firefox 58 brings.

LibreOffice 6.0 Will Launch with Many Design Improvements, Use Elementary Icons

The major LibreOffice 6.0 release is coming next week, and The Document Foundation's Mike Saunders talked with members of the community to get their perspectives on LibreOffice's new design. While it won't bring a massive redesign, as most users may have expected, LibreOffice 6.0 will include a few noteworthy design changes, including new table styles, new gradients, updated motif/splash screen, improved Notebookbars, menu and toolbar improvements, and the Elementary icons. Read more

Linux Foundation introduces the LF Networking Fund, harmonizes​ open source, open standards

The Linux Foundation is taking the first step to bring some commonality across its myriad network efforts by creating the LF Networking Fund (LFN). By creating a combined administrative structure, Linux Foundation said LFN will provide a platform for cross-project collaboration. LFN will form the foundation for collaboration across the network stack: the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation and testing. Read more

Openwashing Surveillance

  • Facebook Open Sources Detectron Object Detection
    The way big companies are open sourcing significant AI is both gratifying and slightly worrying. AI is the biggest revolution since we discovered fire and started making tools. FaceBook AI Research has added to the list of what is available by open sourcing its Detectron project.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection research
    Facebook's artificial intelligence research (FAIR) team today announced it would open-source its object detection platform Detectron, as well as the research the team has done on it.
  • Facebook open-sources object detection work: Watch out, Google CAPTCHA
    acebook has brought us one step closer to a Skynet future made a commitment to computer vision boffinry by open-sourcing its codebase for object detection, Detectron. Written in Python and powered by the Caffe2 deep learning framework, the codebase – which implements object-sniffing algos such as Mask R-CNN and RetinaNet – is available under the Apache 2.0 licence.