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GNOME

GNOME: GSoC Projects

Filed under
Google
OSS
GNOME
  • GSoC part 15: submission

    This is the last entry in the Google Summer of Code series that I have been writing weekly for the last three months. It is different from the usual updates in that I won’t be discussing development progress: rather, this will be the submission report for the project as a whole. I’ll be discussing the "why?" behind the project, the plan that my mentor and I came up with to execute the project, the work I have done over the summer including a video of the result, the things that are left to work on, what I’ve learned during the project and finally, the links to the code that I have written for the actual submission. Of course I finish with a thank-you. Enjoy!

  • Piper Has Turned Into A Very Competent Mouse Configuration UI For Linux

    Student developer Jente Hidskes' work this summer on improving the Piper GTK3 user-interface for configuring gaming mice on Linux via libratbag is now the latest example of a very successful Google Summer of Code (GSoC) project.

    Jente was able to provide some much needed improvements to this GTK3 user-interface for configuring Linux mice via the libratbag daemon. Among the work he accomplished this summer were support for mouse profiles, resolution configuration, LED configuration, button mappings, welcome and error screens, and more.

  • GNOME Games Now Supports Controller Reassignment

    Thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there is a branch pending for allowing game controllers to be re-assigned within GNOME Games.

    GNOME Games, of course, is the GTK desktop program to browse your video game library and when it comes to retro games, even play them within GNOME Games thanks to libretro, etc.

GNOME: GSoC Projects, GTK, and Eolie 0.9.1

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GNOME
  • GSoC Report 4

    This report is about Controller Reassignment.

    Previously, Games used to order controllers according to how they were plugged in. So. if I want to be the P1 (which I always want), I can simply exchange the controller with my brother. But hey, what if he is sitting 5 feet away from me?

  • GSoC Report - Part 1

    GJS is a complex piece of software that does some very low-level manipulation using various libraries; the GNOME libs (GLib and friends), libffi, and Mozilla’s SpiderMonkey JS engine.

  • GSoC ’17: Wrapping Things Up

    My GSoC project on GNOME Calendar was full of ups and downs (more ups of course).   As this was my first GSoC project I was practically new to this workflow. Having weekly meetings, pushing code on a timely basis, discussing ideas regularly with my mentor etc. made things all the more intense. There were weeks were I made more progress than expected and then there were weeks where we headed nowhere (due to lack of knowledge regarding recurrences). The reason for this was using the sparsely documented library, ‘libical‘ and deciphering the cryptic code of ‘evolution calendar‘. But in the end everything came out just fine.

GNOME: Development, GUADEC, and Recipes

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • The joy of rebuilding…

    I guess we all kind of enjoy breaking things and them fixing them up. It might be one of the reasons we want to be programmers. Find a bug, patch it up, test it, break something with what seemed like a good idea, rollback to an earlier version, fix again… etc. It just never ends. And believe it or not, sometimes it really is fun. Sometimes. Unfortunately for me, what follows is a description of one of the other situations, when you really wouldn’t want your precious build to go nuts, but it does. Spoiler: it does have a happy ending, no worries Smile.

  • GUADEC 2017

    It’s summer and it’s GUADEC time! This year’s GUADEC took place in Manchester, England. It was surprisingly less bad for that location Wink The organisers deserve a big round of applause for having pulled the event off. After having organised last year’s GUADEC I have first hands experience running such an event. So a big “thank you” to the team from England Smile

  • Recipes : Wrapping up GSoC ’17

    Its been almost three months that I embarked on GSoC journey with GNOME. And its time to wrap it up. So here it goes ..

Ubuntu 17.10 Continues Refining Its GNOME Shell Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Will Cooke of Canonical is out with another weekly update on the latest happenings for the Ubuntu 17.10 desktop as the "Artful Aardvark" release continues getting closer.

There's been continued work on captive portal detection for Ubuntu 17.10, QPDF/CUPS package upgrades, and a lot of theming work happening this past week for the next Ubuntu release, which has transitioned from the Unity 7 desktop to GNOME Shell. And yes, Wayland still plans to be the default.

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GNOME: GNOME Keysign, BuildStream, Builder, GNOME Settings

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GNOME
  • GSOC 2017 Keysign wrap up

    The transfer of the keys on GNOME Keysign was limited to the LAN only. This limitation can be a problem when e.g. one user does not have access to a WIFI/Ethernet connection or when the users are connected to an isolated network (like a guest WIFI or an University Intranet).

  • GUADEC & BuildStream

    After a much needed 2 week vacation following GUADEC, finally I’m getting around to writing up a GUADEC post.

  • Code Search for GNOME Builder : Final report

    This is the final report for my GSOC Project Code Search for GNOME Builder. First I want to thank to Christian Hergert for helping me in this project. I successfully achieved 2 objectives in this project, fuzzy search of symbols in the project and improving Go to Definition in GNOME Builder. Here is the final code GitHub of this project which will be merged.

  • Meet the Saner, Streamlined GNOME Settings App [Video]

    As you may be aware, the GNOME Control Center is getting some long overdue love and attention in GNOME 3.26. The macOS inspired icon grid used since the early days of GNOME 3 gives way to a cleaner, saner side-bar based layout, punctuated with some sleek new symbolic icons.

  • GNOME Control Center Switches To Its New Settings Layout

    Georges Stavracas has announced that for GNOME 3.25.91 they have finished up work on their new GNOME Settings user-interface, a.k.a. the redesign to the GNOME Control Center.

    The new settings layout is now used by default, now that they finished up the new GNOME Network panel for this settings area. With the new UI they are rebranding GNOME Control Center as GNOME Settings.

  • Introducing Settings (or, the new Control Center)

    if you’re following the GNOME development closely, you’re now more than aware of this movement of reworking GNOME Control Center. It was a remarkably colossal work, specially because we used a bottom-up approach: fix the panels, then switch to the new shell.

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 7

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Today’s change will be about one of our last transformation (non visual but in term of feature) on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME Development Updates

Filed under
GNOME
  • Tracker requires SQLite >= 3.20 to be compiled with –enable-fts5

    Tracker is one of these pieces of software that get no special praise when things work, but you wake up to personal insults on bugzilla when they don’t, today is one of those days.

  • Last Project Phase and 3.26 Features

    Repair and resize is available in the recent 3.25 release and needs at least UDisks 2.7.2. Currently Ext4, XFS and FAT are supported through libblockdev and I hope to extend this list with NTFS soon. There were some race conditions when a resized partition is detected by the kernel again and also the FAT support through libparted is still a bit shaky.

  • GSOC 2017 coming to an end

    Having entered the final week of the GSOC calendar, it is time to wrap things up and reflect on what I’ve accomplished this summer.

GNOME 3.25.91 Released

Filed under
GNOME

Didier Roche: Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 6

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Today’s change is hopefully an unnoticeale change for most of you, but gives better security, a smoother and great experience on our journey on transforming the default session in Ubuntu Artful. For more background on this, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME: Google Summer of Code, GUADEC, Color Emoji

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GNOME
  • GSoC/GUADEC: Wrapping Things Up

    The Google Summer of Code is slowly but surely coming to an end and it’s time to start wrapping thing up for the final evaluation. The documentation cards have been officially pushed to the master of the GNOME Builder and last couple of days were spent just tweaking the feature and going through the code reviews.

    I would also like to take a quick look back at the amazing GUADEC that was held in Manchester this summer and share some of my photos. I was so glad I could attend and connect the faces with the people I have only met online.

  • Color Emoji Support Is Coming to GNOME Desktop

    If you’re a regular readers you’ll know how I’ve longed to see full color emoji support on Linux — and it seems, at long last, I’m very close to getting it!

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.