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GNOME

A WAYLAND STATUS UPDATE

Filed under
GNOME

The list of applications that work ‘natively’ (ie with the GTK+ Wayland backend) is looking pretty good, too. The main straggler here is totem, where we are debugging some issues with the use of subsurfaces in clutter-gtk.

We are homing in on ‘day-to-day usable’. I would love to say the Wayland session is “rock-solid”, but I just spent an hour trying to track track down an ugly memory leak that ended my session rather quickly. So, we are not quite there yet, and more work is needed.

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GNOME Control Center 3.14 RC1 Corrects Lots of Potential Crashes

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GNOME

GNOME Control Center, GNOME's main interface for the configuration of various aspects of your desktop, has been updated to version 3.14 RC1, along with a lot of the packages from the GNOME stack.

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GNOME Software 3.14 Will Work On Arch Linux With PackageKit

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GNOME

Those running GNOME on Arch Linux should be pleased that with the upcoming GNOME 3.14 release that the GNOME Software application should finally play well with PackageKit's Pacman back-end.

Richard Hughes cleaned up the PackageKit back-end for Arch/Pacman this weekend so that GNOME Software will run with it and utilize native AppStream meta-data. This work is through the Alpm/Pacman back-end for using this GNOME application to install and manage new apps for the platform. Richard shared the improved Arch Linux support for GNOME Software via this Google+ post.

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GNOME APPS IN THREE DIMENSIONAL SPACE

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GNOME

The release of GNOME 3.14 is getting closer and closer and I’m trying my best to have the a video ready for release. The manuscript is still open for revision but is at its final stages. Voice-over should finish around next week or so. And in the meantime I am testing a new workflow in Blender.

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Drawing Web content with OpenGL (ES 3.0) instanced rendering

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME

There is one important conclusion coming out from these experiments: The fact that a rasterizer is normally stateless makes it very inefficient to modify a single element in a scene.

By stateless I mean they do not keep semantic information about the elements being drawn. For example, lets say in one frame I draw a rectangle, and for the next frame I want to draw the same rectangle somewhere else on the canvas. You already have a batch with all the elements of the scene, happily stored in a vertex buffer object on GPU memory, and the rectangle in question is there somewhere. If you could keep the offset where that rectangle is in the batch, you could modify its attributes without having to drop and re-submit the whole batch.

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GNOME 3.14 Still Depends On ConsoleKit, More Systemd Still Planned

Filed under
Linux
GNOME

Some plans for the GNOME 3.14 cycle didn't materialize but they're still being developed for future GNOME updates.

For the GNOME 3.14 development cycle was a plan to make most GNOME modules depend on a systemd logind-like API that would only implement the API bits actually used by the respective pieces of GNOME software. The goal was to make this minimal API a shim between the GNOME code and logind for allowing other non-Linux platforms to write an alternative implementation against the API. The purpose of this would be for the BSDs also using GNOME to only have to write a portable implementation of the logind-derived API calls actually being used by GNOME rather than a full, drop-in replacement.

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Also: OpenBSD Made Progress On Their Systemd-Compatible Replacement

SYSTEMD IN GNOME 3.14 AND BEYOND

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GNOME

Before the start of the GNOME 3.14 cycle, Ryan Lorty announced his intention to make most GNOME modules depend on a logind-like API. The API would just implement the bits that are actually used. According to Ryan, most GNOME modules only use a selection of the logind functionality. He wanted to document exactly what we depend on and provide a minimal API. Then we could write a minimal stub implementation for e.g. FreeBSD as we’d know exactly what parts of the API we actually need. The stub would still be minimal; allow GNOME to run, but that’s it.

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A Life Worth Living

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GNOME

So here enters your protagonist. I've left a good job simply for the satisfaction in doing what I think is important.

Let's be honest. I'm terrified. This is the most exciting thing I've ever done. I guess that is what is so attractive to me, adrenaline junkie and all. Will I make it a year? Will I finish what I'm setting out to? Will I let everyone down? Will people hate me because they don't agree with what I think is important? All of these questions, playing like tapes in the back of my consciousness.

The GNOME community has always felt like home to me. Some people leave their jobs and do the start-up thing. That's fun and all, but I'd rather just write software for my friends. Nothing brings me more satisfaction than contributing to this group of people. And like Luis said so many years ago, GNOME is about people.

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GNOME 3.14 Beta 2 Has Been Released!

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GNOME

Frederic Peters has announced the release of GNOME 3.13.91, the second beta release which is a new step towards 3.14.0, scheduled to be released September 24th. This beta release updates many core applications such as: adwaita-icon-theme, Baobab, Caribou, Clutter, Clutter-gtk, Epiphany, Evince, GNOME Display Manager, glibmm, Gnome Contacts, GNOME Control Center, GNOME Desktop, GNOME Screenshot, GNOME Shell, GNOME System Monitor, grilo, GTK+, LibGWeather, Mutter, Nautilus (Files), Pango, Totem (Videos), Vala, and more.

There are alot modules that have not been upgraded in this release. I have made a list of them so you can read and get informed about them.

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The GNOME Foundation's 2013 annual report

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GNOME

The GNOME Foundation has put out its annual report for 2013 as a 24-page PDF file. "As you will see when you read this annual report, there have been a lot of great things that have happened for the GNOME Foundation during this period. Two new companies joined our advisory board, the Linux Foundation and Private Internet Access. The work funded by our accessibility campaign was completed and we ran a successful campaign for privacy. During this period, there was a fantastic Board of Directors, a dedicated Engagement team (who worked so hard to put this report together), and the conference teams (GNOME.Asia, GUADEC and the Montreal Summit) knocked it out of the park. Most importantly, we’ve had an influx of contributors, more so than I’ve seen in some time."

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, "US Huawei Blackballing Efforts" and Microsoft's Back Doors Keep Crackers Busy

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • US Huawei Blackballing Efforts Stall Due To Lack Of 'Actual Facts'
    During the Trump era, the US government has dramatically ramped up claims that Chinese hardware vendor Huawei is a nefarious spy for the Chinese government, blackballing it from the U.S. telecom market. From pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies, this effort hasn't been subtle. While Huawei should never be confused with a saint (what telecom company would be?) there's several problems with the effort. The biggest being that despite a decade of hand-wringing and one eighteen month investigation by the US government, there's still no public evidence Huawei uses its network gear to spy on Americans. That's not sitting well with countries we've asked to join along in the fun.
  • Sorry, Linux. We know you want to be popular, but cyber-crooks are all about Microsoft for now
    Eight out of the ten most exploited vulnerabilities tracked by threat intelligence biz Recorded Future in 2018 targeted Microsoft products – though number two on its list was, surprise surprise, a Flash flaw. The most exploited vuln in the firm's hall of shame was a remote code execution flaw in Windows' VBScript engine that could pwn users who opened a booby-trapped web page with Internet Explorer. "Exploit kits associated with this vulnerability were noted to spread the malware Trickbot through phishing attacks," said Recorded Future in a report published today. The Flash vuln was none other than one exploited by North Korean state-backed hackers – first detected by South Korea's CERT, which discovered a flood of booby-trapped MS Office documents, web pages, spam messages and more.

Graphics and Games: NVIDIA, Orbital/Vulkan, Cataclysm and System Shock 3

  • NVIDIA Shows Off Quake II Path-Traced Using Vulkan RTX/Ray-Tracing
    ne of the demos NVIDIA is showing off this week at their GPU Technology Conference is Quake II being path-traced using a Vulkan port of the game and adapted to handle VK_NV_ray_tracing functionality paired with the latest GeForce RTX GPUs. Q2VKPT is a path-traced version of Quake II started by a former NVIDIA intern and is rendered using Vulkan and does support Linux.
  • Orbital: A PlayStation 4 Emulator That Is Emulating The PS4's AMD GPU Using Vulkan
    Orbital is an open-source project providing a virtualization-based PlayStation 4 emulator that is still in its early stages but what interests us is its technical details including the use of Vulkan/SPIR-V. Orbital leverages QEMU and other open-source components. At this stage it's not running any PS4 games but is able to boot into safe mode on PS4 5.xx kernels.
  • Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead, a free and open source turn-based survival game had a huge update
    It occurred to me today, that no one here at GOL seems to have ever written about the free and open source turn-based survival game Cataclysm - Dark Days Ahead. Okay, so what is it? A classic roguelike with a survival theme, set in a post-apocalyptic procedurally generated world.
  • System Shock 3 may see Linux support, OtherSide still working on Underworld Ascendant for Linux
    OtherSide Entertainment have teased out a new short video of System Shock 3 and it may see Linux support. Not to be confused with the crowdfunded System Shock reboot that Nightdive Studios are currently working on. System Shock 3 is being made with some of the original team behind the first two games as well like Warren Spector, so it should remain faithful to the series while being a rather nice upgrade in visuals.

Stable kernels 5.0.3, 4.20.17, 4.19.30, 4.14.107 and 4.9.164

  • Linux 5.0.3
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.0.3 kernel. All users of the 5.0 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.0.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.0.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...
  • Linux 4.20.17
  • Linux 4.19.30
  • Linux 4.14.107
  • Linux 4.9.164

Firefox 66 Released

Firefox now prevents websites from automatically playing sound. You can add individual sites to an exceptions list or turn blocking off. Read more Also: Firefox 66 Arrives - Blocks Auto-Playing Sounds, Hides Title Bar By Default For Linux