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GNOME

GNOME Online Accounts 3.13.1 Ditches Twitter and Windows Live Support

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GNOME

The GNOME developers announced that the latest version of GNOME Online Accounts, 3.13.1, has arrived and comes with just a couple of changes, which are quite important.

The 3.13.x branch of GNOME is strictly for development and it will eventually evolve into the stable 3.14, but that's a long way ahead. Until then, the developer chose to make some very interesting changes

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GNOME MUSIC 3.13.1 RELEASED!

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GNOME

Last Monday, GNOME Music 3.13.1 was released. Here are the changes, though some of them were already released along 3.12.1.

The code that looks up and caches the album art was rewritten by Vadim, so it was a lot faster now. Also, the album art in the Albums view will now be loaded on-scroll – they won’t load unless they are not shown in the window.

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GNOME 3.13.1 Released

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GNOME

Here it is, the starting point of the GNOME 3.14 development cycle:
the 3.13.1 snapshot release.

To compile GNOME 3.13.1, you can use the jhbuild [1] modulesets [2]
(which use the exact tarball versions from the official release).

[1] http://library.gnome.org/devel/jhbuild/
[2] http://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.13.1/

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GNOME Shell & Mutter 3.13.1 Released

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The changes are rather light this early on into the GNOME 3.13 development cycle, and there weren't even any NEWS release files to accompany Mutter 3.13.1 and GNOME Shell 3.13.1, but both packages are now checked in for the imminent release of GNOME 3.13.1.

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GNOME and the GIGO Principle

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GNOME

GNOME 3 is usually defended in terms of design excellence. However, while GNOME has been developed with close attention to design, that does not mean that its basic foundations are as grounded in design principles as you might infer.

Rather, a look at GNOME 3's early history shows that development was mostly a consistent realization of principles described early in the process -- principles founded on the impressions of the Design Team and apparently backed by little theory. This inconsistency between how GNOME is marketed and how it was actually designed seems the major reason for its sometimes rocky reception.

This is not the story GNOME tries to tell. Instead, GNOME 3 is described in language that implies a triumph of design. On its home page, GNOME 3 is described as "designed from the ground up to help you have the best possible computing experience" with words like "crafted" and "harmonious whole" added for good measure. The GNOME Shell design page has a similar emphasis, with the design expertise of the project participants mentioned in the first paragraph.

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Did the GNOME 3 developers violate design principles?

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GNOME

GNOME 3 is one of the most controversial desktop environments in open source history. Flame wars have raged back and forth between GNOME 3 advocates and critics for quite a while now. Datamation examines the history of GNOME 3 and considers whether or not the GNOME 3 developers violated design principles when they created it.

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Parsix GNU/Linux 6.0r0 Is an Interesting Mix of Debian and GNOME

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GNU
Linux
GNOME
Debian

Parsix GNU/Linux, a live and installation DVD based on Debian, aiming to provide a ready-to-use, easy-to-install desktop and laptop-optimized operating system, is now at version 6.0r0 and is ready for testing.

The developers' ultimate goal is to offer users an easy-to-use OS based on Debian's Wheezy branch, which makes use of the latest stable release of GNOME desktop environment.

"This version ships with GNOME Shell 3.10.3, and Linux 3.12.17 kernel built on top of rock solid Debian Wheezy (7.0) platform. All base packages have been synchronized with Debian Wheezy repositories as of April 17, 2014. This version comes with a systemd based live boot mode," reads the official announcement...

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Getting Things GNOME: Summer is coming!

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GNOME

The status quo of Getting Things Gnome heavily depends on generic backend & local xml database for different third-party services. The class generic backend is inherited by backends for different services. This makes it quite difficult to add new services independent of generic backend, and maintain the core modules, including generic backend, independent of backend service sub classes.

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GNOME 3.12.1 out: PDF accessibility progress

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GNOME

Welcome to a new “GNOME 3.12 is out blog post”, somewhat late because I wanted to focus on 3.12.1 instead of the usual 3.12.0, and because I was away for several days due to Easter holidays.

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GNOME Books could be great for Linux ebook junkies

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I have to admit that I’m a bit of an ebook junkie, I’m always reading something and when I’m done with one book then it’s on to the next. So I was very happy to see a report today that Marta Milakovic has proposed an open source ebook reading application for GNOME. Given the soaring popularity of ebooks, I think this is a fantastic idea. I’d like to see something similar in all Linux desktop environments.

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More in Tux Machines

More GNU/Linux Games and CodeWeavers Joins The Khronos Group

Get Fresh Wallpaper Everyday Using Variety in Ubuntu/Linux

Variety is a cool utility available for Linux systems which makes your dull desktop look great, every day. This free wallpaper changer utility replaces your wallpaper in your desktop in an interval. You can set it to change wallpaper in every 5 minutes also! Read more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • The Internet of Torts

    Rebecca Crootof at Balkinization has two interesting posts:

    • Introducing the Internet of Torts, in which she describes "how IoT devices empower companies at the expense of consumers and how extant law shields industry from liability."
    • Accountability for the Internet of Torts, in which she discusses "how new products liability law and fiduciary duties could be used to rectify this new power imbalance and ensure that IoT companies are held accountable for the harms they foreseeably cause.

    Below the fold, some commentary on both.

  • Password Analyst Says QAnon’s ‘Codes’ Are Consistent With Random Typing

    “The funny thing about people is that even when we type random stuff we tend to have a signature. This guy, for example, likes to have his hand on the ends of each side of the keyboard (e.g., 1,2,3 and 7,8,9) and alternate,” Burnett wrote in his thread.

  • Uber taps former NSA official to head security team

    Olsen, who served as the counterterrorism head under President Obama until 2014, will replace Joe Sullivan as the ride-hailing company's top security official.

    Sullivan was fired by Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi over his handling of a massive cyber breach last year that happened during former CEO Travis Kalanick’s tenure.

  • Malware has no trouble hiding and bypassing macOS user warnings

    With the ability to generate synthetic clicks, an attack, for example, could dismiss many of Apple's privacy-related security prompts. On recent versions of macOS, Apple has added a confirmation window that requires users to click an OK button before an installed app can access geolocation, contacts, or calendar information stored on the Mac. Apple engineers added the requirement to act as a secondary safeguard. Even if a machine was infected by malware, the thinking went, the malicious app wouldn’t be able to copy this sensitive data without the owner’s explicit permission.

  • Caesars Palace not-so-Praetorian guards intimidate DEF CON goers with searches [Updated]
  • Amazon Echo turned into snooping device by Chinese hackers [sic]

    Cybersecurity boffins from Chinese firm Tencent's Blade security research team exploited various vulnerabilities they found in the Echo smart speaker to eventually coax it into becoming an eavesdropping device.