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GNOME

Ubuntu and GNOME Devs Team Up to Ease Your "Unity to GNOME" Transition

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GNOME
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system is only a few weeks away, and it will be shipping with the recently released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, running on top of the next-generation Wayland display server.

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also: Canonical Adds Support for GNOME's JHBuild Tool to Its Snapcraft Snappy Creator

GNOME and KDE: Librem 5, KDE Accessibility, and GNOME 3.26 Release Video

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KDE
GNOME
  • Encrypted, Open Source Phone That Won’t Track Users Launches Crowdfunding Campaign

    Here’s the weird thing about ears: you can’t shut them. You can shut your eyes, but you can’t shut your ears.

    The same is true for our devices. While no one builds devices with built in covers for cameras, it’s easy to add one. Microphones are trickier. In fact, there’s a persistent conspiracy theory that Facebook constantly listens for buzzwords to trigger ads through the microphones on people’s phones.

  • ​KDE Partners With Purism To Create The “First Truly Free” Linux Smartphone

    Just last month, we told you about a new crowdfunding project launched by privacy-focused hardware maker Purism. The device was named Librem 5 and it was expected to ship with PureOS, an open source Debian GNU/Linux derivative.

  • Testing Applications for Color Blindness

    At the Randa Meeting 2017 Volker and I decided to write a little KWin plugin. Activating this plugin you can simulate various types of color vision deficiencies, either on individual windows or full-screen. The plugin works by running a fragment shader on the respective window/screen.

  • The Official GNOME 3.26 Release Video Has Arrived

    The GNOME 3.26 release arrived earlier this week, and now an official release video has popped out to help promote it.

    The 1 minute 51 second clip zips through all of the pertinent new details, including support for color emoji, many of the core app updates, and (of course) the spiffy new search layout and streamlined Settings app.

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 12

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GNOME
Ubuntu

We’ll focus today on our advanced user base. We, of course, try to keep our default user experience as comprehensible as possible for the wider public, but we want as well to think about our more technical users by fine tuning the experience… and all of this, obviously, while changing our default session to use GNOME Shell. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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More Coverage of GNOME 3.26 'Manchester'

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 'Manchester' desktop environment is here, Linux fans!

    When people think of Linux-based operating systems, they often imagine people typing in a terminal or coding in a basement while drinking Mountain Dew -- yeah, those stupid old stereotypes still exists, sadly. While that is surely part of the user base, other users choose an open source operating system for nothing more than using their computer as a tool. In other words, some folks use Ubuntu, Fedora, or other distros just to get normal stuff done -- word processing, web surfing, and more. No terminal. No coding. No religious-like experiences.

  • GNOME 3.26 Officially Released

    GNOME 3.26 has been officially released — hurrah! If you’ve been waiting on the official nod to pull the string of your celebratory party popper, that’s your cue!

  • GNOME 3.26 is great

    I am incredibly excited for GNOME 3.26, and it’s been hard to wait for it. I openly admit this fact. This release saw serious, important improvements all over the places, new features landed, some others didn’t, thousands of bugs were fixed all across the platform, and I’d like to share my personal highlights for this release.

GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" is Out

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" Desktop Environment Debuts Officially, Here's What's New

    After six months of hard work, the GNOME Project's development team was proud to announce today, September 13, 2017, the immediate release and general availability of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    Dubbed "Manchester," after the city where the annual GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) developer conference took place this year, the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment packs many enhancements for the apps and core components included in the GNOME Stack, along with new features.

    This year, on August 15, the GNOME Project celebrated its 20th anniversary, and we couldn't be happier to be using GNOME as our main desktop environment. The biggest new features of the GNOME 3.26 release are support for emoji, Flatpak improvements, as well as a brand-new Control Center that's now called simply "Settings."

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    The GNOME Project is excited to announce the release of version 3.26, the latest version of GNOME 3. The new version is the result of six months’ hard work by the GNOME community, and comes packed with improvements and new features. Announcing the release, Matthias Clasen of the GNOME Release Team, said “We are happy and proud to announce GNOME 3.26, the latest major release of GNOME, “Manchester”, just a few weeks after we celebrated the 20th birthday of GNOME at GUADEC. As always, the GNOME community did a great job in delivering exciting features, completing translations, and refining the user experience. Thanks!”

  • GNOME 3.26 Released

    GNOME 3.26 "Manchester" has been officially released.

    Matthias Clasen announced a few minutes ago on the mailing list, "This release brings refinements to the system search, animations for maximizing and unmaximizing windows and support for color Emoji. Improvements to core GNOME applications include a redesigned Settings application, a new display settings panel, Firefox sync in the Web browser, and many more."

  • Introducing GNOME 3.26: “Manchester”

    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 24105 changes, made by approximately 778 contributors.

    3.26 has been named “Manchester” in recognition of this year’s GUADEC organizing team. GUADEC is GNOME’s primary annual conference and is only possible due to the amazing work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Manchester, UK, and was a big success. Thank you Team Manchester!

Preview of Next Month's Ubuntu and This Week's GNOME Release

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GNOME
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 5: New System Settings!

    Now, Ubuntu Artful gets a new System Settings with a fully-new interface from GNOME 3.25. It's officially renamed to Settings and it got big changes. It's very amusing to read Georges Staracas' article (the developer of Settings) especially the fact that more than 30.000 lines of code changed since v3.20 by 15 contributors! This means when finally released, Ubuntu 17.10 will include Settings by default. Now let us see the quick look at Artful here. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu’s Suru Icon Theme Is Being Revived

    If you loved the look of the Unity 8 desktop as used in Canonical’s shelved Ubuntu phone and tablet project, I can guarantee you’re going to love the following icon set.

    Why? Because it is the Ubuntu phone and tablet icon set!

    Yup, even though Ubuntu Touch died and Canonical (painfully) let the majority of its design team go, the story isn’t yet done for the Suru icon theme.

  • See What’s New in GNOME 3.26

    Today sees the release of GNOME 3.26 — and you’re probably wondering what new features are going to be on offer.

    [...]

    The GNOME desktop is made up of multiple parts. This includes the main user interface (called ‘GNOME Shell’) as well as core apps (like the file manager Nautilus), and ‘invisible’ background libraries and services that help glue everything together.

GNOME/GTK: OpenGL, WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0, GTK4's Vulkan Support and Icon Size

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Development
GNOME
  • Flickerless Gtk3 OpenGL Transitions

    While I got OpenGL transitions working under Gtk3 at the end of last year basically matching the Gtk2/Generic OpenGL quality the transition into and out of the OpenGL sequence wasn't very satisfying. And with access to HiDPI it was clearly even worse with an unscaled image momentarily appearing before the correct one.

  • LibreOffice Gets Flicker-Free OpenGL Transitions

    Last year McNamara got GTK3 OpenGL transitions working, but it was less than perfect. But now he's managed to provide flicker-less GTK3 OpenGL transitions after landing some improvements into LibreOffice Git.

  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 released!
  • WebKitGTK+ 2.18.0 Brings WebDriver Support, Remote Inspector & Kinetic Scrolling

    The WebDriver support is interesting and allows easily automating/scripting interactions with the browser. WebDriver is just geared for WebKit-based browsers. Details on the WebDriver WebKitGTK+ support via this blog post. When time magically allows I would like to investigate the feasibility of using it for some automated browser benchmarks.

    On the developer front the WebCrypto API is now enabled by default. Additionally, there are APIs to allow overriding the popup menu of select elements and to create a WebKitContextMenuItem from a GAction.

  • GTK4's Vulkan Support Continues Maturing

    One of the questions that came up following our GNOME 3.26 feature overview was how GTK4's Vulkan renderer is coming along.

    It's coming along as is GTK4, albeit not ready for production use quite yet.

  • You need an application icon of at least 64×64 in size

    At the moment the appstream-builder in Fedora requires a 48x48px application icon to be included in the AppStream metadata. I’m sure it’s no surprise that 48×48 padded to 64×64 and then interpolated up to 128×128 (for HiDPI screens) looks pretty bad. For Fedora 28 and higher I’m going to raise the minimum icon size to 64×64 which I hope people realize is actually a really low bar.

Ubuntu GNOME Shell in Artful: Day 11

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Let’s talk today about collaboration (with System76 in this case) and how we give more benefits to both Ubuntu and the upcoming Pop! OS user base. For more background on our current transition to GNOME Shell in artful, you can refer back to our decisions regarding our default session experience as discussed in my blog post.

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GNOME: A Look At The New Features Of GNOME 3.26, Mutter, WebDriver Support in WebKitGTK+ 2.18

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GNOME
  • A Look At The New Features Of GNOME 3.26

    GNOME 3.26 is the project's latest six-month update to this open-source desktop environment to be used now by Ubuntu 17.10, Fedora 27, and others. I have been testing out the near-final GNOME 3.26 packages via the Fedora 27 repository over the weekend. Overall it's been a stable and good experience. Some of the new features or changes of GNOME 3.26 are outlined below.

  • GNOME's Mutter Loses Some Of Its X11 Dependence

    One of the interesting Google Summer of Code projects this year associated with the GNOME project was on reworking the Mutter compositor from requiring X11/XWayland code-paths for starting the Wayland compositor.

    Student developer Armin Krezović worked to address the issue that even when Mutter is acting as a Wayland compostior rather than just an X window manager, the X11 support is still present and there's a hard dependency on XWayland being present, even if it goes unused. Armin was partially successful in his summer work in allowing Mutter to act as a Wayland-only compositor, free from any XWayland support if so desired.

  • WebDriver support in WebKitGTK+ 2.18

    WebDriver is an automation API to control a web browser. It allows to create automated tests for web applications independently of the browser and platform. WebKitGTK+ 2.18, that will be released next week, includes an initial implementation of the WebDriver specification.

KDE and GNOME: Developing KDE PIM with Docker, GObject Introspection, GNOME 3.26 Days Away

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KDE
GNOME
  • Developing KDE PIM with Docker

    Getting started with contributing to KDE PIM can be hard – we have nearly 60 repositories with complicated dependencies – just getting that right can discourage many people from even trying. And then there’s, of course, the risk factor of running development build alongside your production Kontact, endangering your precious emails.

    To address all these issues I have created a Docker image. It’s based on the KDE Neon Developer edition and it has all the dependencies pre-installed and pre-configured and comes with a set of handy shell scripts to make your life easier. It also has the environment set up properly so that you can run the development build of Kontact inside of the container – completely isolated from your production installation.

    Interested now? Follow the instructions how to build the Docker image and how to run the container on our KDE PIM Docker wiki page.

  • The Magic of GObject Introspection

    When we started GNOME in 1997, we didn't want to write all of it in C. We had some inspiration from elsewhere.

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  • Approaching 3.26

    So, we're on final stretch towards the GNOME 3.26 release next week, just released the last beta of Maps (3.25.92) earlier in the week. This cycle hasn't seen that any real ground-breaking user-visible changes. But various smaller bugfixes. Nevertheless there's been a few nice improvements on the surface (as seen in earlier blogposts).

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations