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GNOME: Glade 3.21.0 and GNOME.Asia

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GNOME
  • Glade 3.21.0 Released!

    Glade 3.21.0 is the first development release in the 3.21 series

    It has a new modern UI for an improved, more streamline GUI design
    workflow.

  • Glade 3.21 Released For Whipping Up GTK3 Interfaces

    Glade 3.21 was released today as the latest development release of this tool for quickly designing GTK3/GNOME user-interfaces.

  • GNOME.Asia and Engagmeent update

    GNOME.Asia was an amazing event and I wanted to reach out to the organizers and thank them for the wonderful reception that I received while I was there. The trip to Chongqing was mostly uneventful other than the fact every Chinese official was gunning for my battery brick when going through airport security. After a long layover in Beijing, I was landed in Chongqing and met up with Mathias Clasen and proceeded to head to the hotel.

GNOME Development

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • Ubuntu Monthly Update Cadence

    For core components they need to wait there turn so they would be the likely culprit if something breaks. To do that we’ll have a list of how closely coupled different components are. For example, these could be the highly coupled components: Kernel - Mesa
    Kernel - Systemd
    Mesa - Gnome
    Systemd - Gnome

  • A Proposal To Update Ubuntu's Kernel/Mesa/GNOME Components On A Monthly Basis

    It's not quite the Ubuntu rolling-release process that some have proposed over the years, but a new proposal is being formulated for shipping updates to key Ubuntu system components on a monthly basis rather than having to wait six months for updates to the Linux kernel, Mesa, etc.

    Longtime Ubuntu developer Bryan Quigley is currently working on an "Ubuntu Monthly" proposal by which key system components would see updates on a monthly cadence, when new releases are available and warranted, etc. The goals of this proposal would be to get "fresh software" to users faster, predictable that it's useful for more users, useful for business use-cases, trivial to triage problems with upgrading just one component at a time, and be easier for systems to be updated.

  • Adding tags to my jekyll website

    This iteration of the olea.org website uses the Jekyll static website generator. From time to time I add some features to the configuration. This time I wanted to add tags support to my posts. After a fast search I found jekyll-tagging. To put it working has been relatively easy because if you are not into Ruby you can misconfigure the gem dependencies as me. And to add some value to this post I’m just sharing some tips I added not written in the project readme file.

  • State of Meson in GLib/GStreamer

    During the last couple of months I’ve been learning the Meson build system. Since my personal interests in Open Source Software are around GLib and GStreamer, and they both have Meson and Autotools build systems in parallel, I’ve set as personal goal to list (and try to fix) blocker bugs preventing from switching them to Meson-only. Note that I’m neither GLib nor GStreamer maintainer, so it’s not my call whether or not they will drop Autotools.

Mozilla: Firefox Extensions for New Year’s Resolutions and Rust Programming

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Development
Moz/FF
GNOME
  • Firefox Extensions for New Year’s Resolutions

    It’s that time of year again where we endeavor to improve ourselves, to wash away poor habits of the past and improve our lot in life. Yet most of us fall short of our yearly resolution goals. Why? Maybe we just haven’t found the right Firefox extensions to assist our annual renewals…

  • This Week in Rust 214

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Zeeshan Ali: My journey to Rust

    As most folks who know me already know, I've been in love with Rust language for a few years now and in the last year I've been actively coding in Rust. I wanted to document my journey to how I came to love this programming language, in hope that it will help people to see the value Rust brings to the world of software but if not, it would be nice to have my reason documented for my own sake.

Customize GNOME Desktop With These Tips in Ubuntu 17.10

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GNOME

Some basic and some interesting GNOME customization tips to get more out of your Ubuntu 17.10 desktop.
Read more

KDE and GNOME: KDE 2.*, Krita and GNOME.Asia

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • You Can Experiment With KDE 2.2.2 & Qt2 This Christmas

    If you find yourself with some extra time this holiday season and want to dive into a classic codebase on your modern Linux desktop, KDE developer Helio Castro has been working on his porting skills by porting KDE 2.2.2 and Qt2 to work on modern Linux systems.

    KDE 2 was released in 2000 with the use of the DCOP communication protocol, the still-living KIO I/O library, KHTML that at the time brought HTML 4.0 rendering, and Konqueror came as the default web-browser.

    So far he's got kdelibs 2.2.2 working -- tests are passing, graphics are working, and overall a bit beyond a "proof of concept" stage. As part of this "KDE 2 Restoration Project" he's trying to maintain the original code as much as possible but along the way also replacing the Autotools build system with CMake.

  • Interview with Rositsa Zaharieva

    My name is Rositsa (also known as Roz) and I’m somewhat of a late blooming artist. When I was a kid I was constantly drawing and even wanted to become an artist. Later on I chose a slightly different path for my education and career and as a result I now have decent experience as a web and graphic designer, front end developer and copywriter. I am now completely sure that I want to devote myself entirely to art and that’s what I’m working towards.

  • GNOME.Asia Summit 2017

    Thanks professors from university give us very good panel discussion, thanks Emily Chen to host this great panel discussion.  
    It’s import to get support in university when we want to promote open source and freeware all the time.

Managing tasks, time, and making sure one takes a break: Integrating Taskwarrior, Timewarrior, and Gnome Pomodoro

Filed under
Software
GNOME

With the new year, come resolutions. On many a list will there be a determination to do better in the coming year, to be more organised, more efficient, more productive.

I'm quite organised myself. I have lists, calendars, reminders, budgets, and all of that. Being a FOSS person, my first thought, inevitably, is to see if there's a piece of software that would aid me.

This post documents how one can get Taskwarrior, Timewarrior, and Gnome Pomodoro to work together to manage tasks, track them, and break those long hours into smaller bits with regular breaks.

Read more

GTK4 Picks Up More OpenGL Renderer Improvements, Glyph Cache

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GNOME

GTK4 continues looking good and even better now thanks to nearly 100 commits improving its OpenGL renderer.

GNOME developer Timm Bäder committed dozens of OpenGL renderer improvements to the GTK4 tool-kit code-base on Thursday. Perhaps most noticeable is the introduction of a GL glyph cache. This OpenGL glyph cache is based upon GTK4's Vulkan glyph cache that was added back in September.

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GNOME: GStreamer, CEF on Wayland, Christmas GNOME Maps, ArcMPD

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GNOME
  • GStreamer Rust bindings release 0.10.0 & gst-plugin release 0.1.0

    Today I’ve released version 0.10.0 of the Rust GStreamer bindings, and after a journey of more than 1½ years the first release of the GStreamer plugin writing infrastructure crate “gst-plugin”.

  • CEF on Wayland

    TL;DR: we have patches for CEF to enable its usage on Wayland and X11 through the Mus/Ozone infrastructure that is to become Chromium’s streamlined future. And also for Content Shell!

    At Collabora we recently assisted a customer who wanted to upgrade their system from X11 to Wayland. The problem: they use CEF as a runtime for web applications and CEF was not Wayland-ready. They also wanted to have something which was as future-proof and as upstreamable as possible, so the Chromium team’s plans were quite relevant.

  • Christmas Maps

    So, we're approaching the end of the year and holidays, so I thought I should share some updates on some going-ons in Maps.

    One issue we've had on our table is the way we do attribution. Currently in 3.26 and earlier we have shown the common OSM attribution and a provider logo on the map view.

  • ArcMPD is a Translucent GTK Theme Based on Arc

    As you might be able to guess from the name ArcMPD is a fork of the super popular Arc GTK theme.

    But, unlike its inspiration, ArcMPD is far less conservative with translucent touches in the header bar and sidebar of windows.

Nautilus desktop plans

Filed under
GNOME

Nautilus had have a feature called “the desktop” which adds icons on the background of the user workspace, similar to Windows.

The desktop was disabled for the default experience when GNOME 3 came out now 6 years ago, and so far has been mostly unmaintained. I spent around 3 months of work two years ago to try to save it somehow and did a rearchitectural work to try to separate the desktop from the Nautilus app so it won’t affect Nautilus development, and while it achieved some degree of separation, it didn’t achieve its main purpose and unfortunately brought even more problems than we had before. Now it has got to a point where the desktop is blocking us deeply in basically every major front we have set for future releases.

Also we notice that users rightfully have expectations for the desktop to work decently, and we acknowledge this is far from the reality and we are aware that the desktop is in a very poor state.

Read more

GNOME: Bluetooth, Predictions, Librsvg and NetworkManager

Filed under
GNOME
  • More Bluetooth (and gaming) features

    Finally, this is the boring part. Benjamin and I reworked code that's internal to gnome-bluetooth, as used in the Settings panel as well as the Shell, to make it use modern facilities like GDBusObjectManager. The overall effect of this is, less code, less brittle and more reactive when Bluetooth adapters come and go, such as when using airplane mode.

  • Some predictions for 2018

    Ever since Steve Jobs died it has become quite clear in my opinion that the emphasis
    on the traditional desktop is fading from Apple. The pace of hardware refreshes seems
    to be slowing and MacOS X seems to be going more and more stale. Some pundits have already
    started pointing this out and I predict that in 2018 Apple will be no longer consider the
    cool kid on the block for people looking for laptops, especially among the tech savvy crowd.
    Hopefully a good opportunity for Linux on the desktop to assert itself more.

  • Librsvg 2.40.20 is released

    Today I released librsvg 2.40.20. This will be the last release in the 2.40.x series, which is deprecated effectively immediately.

    People and distros are strongly encouraged to switch to librsvg 2.41.x as soon as possible. This is the version that is implemented in a mixture of C and Rust. It is 100% API and ABI compatible with 2.40.x, so it is a drop-in replacement for it. If you or your distro can compile Firefox 57, you can probably build librsvg-2.41.x without problems.

  • NetworkManager 1.10.2 Released with Support for "onlink" IPv4 Routes Attribute

    GNOME developer Beniamino Galvani announced the availability of the first point release of the NetworkManager 1.10 open-source network connection manager software.

    NetworkManager is the most popular network connection manager tool these days, coming pre-installed with numerous GNU/Linux distributions. The latest stable release, NetworkManager 1.10.2, is here about five weeks after the launch of NetworkManager 1.10.0 to add a handful of new features and improvements.

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