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GNOME

GSoC and Outreachy in GNOME and KDE

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

     

  • GSoC 2021 KMyMoney - Week 1 and 2

    A significant part of my project is to work on improvements. While starting the project I found that the above UI and the functionality part to create the online quotes page is already written in the libalkimia (master). After implementing the page I noticed a crash when there was some interaction done on the UI buttons or textboxes. By this, I initially thought that it may be due to some slot. Also, the online quotes data weren’t visible on the online quotes that were in the kmymoneyrc config file. I fetched the traceback through the Dr Konqi wizard. It was due to a segmentation fault in a slot. I traced the specified line of code in the log. It pointed me to the function which is used to read the kmymoneyrc file.

    [...]

    My week 3 and week 4 is planned for writing unit tests. But, in the community bonding meet, Ralf sir said to me that tests are already written. So, I will be running those tests and working on that if something is missing. Also, the “add quote source” button seems disabled that is need to be figured out.

  • Manuel Genovés: GSoC update – designing an animation API

    Based on that and on talks with both my mentor (Alexander) and Jonas Dreßler (an experienced GNOME Shell developer who has fought with animation API designing before) I’ve come with the following UML diagram...

  • Everyone Struggles

    I am almost at the end of the third week of my Outreachy internship and the journey has been nothing but phenomenal so far! I’ve learned so many new things! Outreachy has been a journey filled with learning for me, right from the contribution period. This was my first time contributing to open source and was confused by a lot of things.

    Though I have sufficient knowledge of all the required technology stack like Git, JavaScript and Python. It still took me few days to understand what was going on in the community “how the open source contribution works”, “how to make the first contribution” and the list goes on..! To get started, I joined the GNOME matrix channel, introduced myself and started interacting. All the community people were really helpful and suggested me some issues to start with(basically to gain the confidence) and then slowly guided me towards some more technical issues.

    Talking about the vocabulary term, Do you know what AST is? Because I didn’t. It scared me at first. My first response after hearing this keyword was “What!, Another thing to add in the list of unknowns.”. Later it turned out to be a familiar word from compiler design.

Librem Themes

Filed under
GNOME
Gadgets

High contrast is baked into GTK. This means most apps on the Librem 5 support high contrast, at least in the GTK menus. With a bit of theming, the phone shell can follow suit and bring high contrast to your pocket.

[...]

Librem 14, Librem Mini, and even the Librem Server can all use gnome-shell themes. You can find lots to test or modify over at gnome-look. At the moment, the Gnome shell is at version 3.8, which is widely supported on updated themes. Once you find a theme, extract it to “~/.themes/”.

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KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

  • KDE plasma desktop updated to 5.22.2.1 in PCLinuxOS

    KDE plasma desktop packages have been updated to 5.22.2.1 and shipped to the software repository. This update provides small but important bug fixes for the KDE desktop.

  • Week 1 & 2 GSoC-Krita

    After the coding period officialy began. I started the basic implementation for Pin Reference Image & Integrate Crop in Krita.

    I started addting the options in the UI file for both of these features . And then integrated the options with current reference image and layer .So the UI options will switch the visibility and the crop decorations with the active selections and vice versa too . These were implemented in Krita for some tools so i could take inspiration from them . After these Dmitry suggested to use the shape clipping functionality for cropping reference so the rendering part is already taken care of. That’s a huge help .

  • Piotr Brzeziński: GSoC 2021: Beat detection testing

    The first thing I need to implement music-syncing functionality in Pitivi is a piece of software capable of analysing a given audio track and returning some kind of information about its beat timing.

  • Tobias Bernard: Community Power Part 3: Just Do It!

    In parts 1 and 2 of the series we looked at how different groups inside the GNOME community work together to get things done. In this post we’ll look at what that means for people wanting to push for their personal agenda, e.g. getting a specific feature implemented or bug fixed.

    Implicit in the theoretical question how power works in GNOME is often a more practical one: How can I get access to it? How can I exercise power to get something I want?

    At a high level that’s very easy to answer: You either do the work yourself, or you convince someone else to do it.

Linux for Starters: Your Guide to Linux – Navigating the Desktop – Part 6

Filed under
Linux
GNOME
Ubuntu

This is a series that offers a gentle introduction to Linux for newcomers.

In this article, we’ll guide you around the Ubuntu desktop.

Ubuntu uses GNOME, a free and open-source desktop environment. There’s lots of other desktops available, but we recommend you explore GNOME before experimenting with other desktops.

While the Ubuntu desktop has some similarities with the Windows desktop, there are lots of differences. But it doesn’t take long before you’ll be enjoying its great features.

Let’s see the desktop in action. Our annotated image is taken from a vanilla installation of Ubuntu 21.04.

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Fete de la Musique and why I don’t use Google

Filed under
Google
GNOME

Today is Fete de la Musique in the French-speaking world.

It feels like the perfect time to release the video of former GNOME employee Magdalen Berns singing Zombie. I recorded this at the Google Mentor Summit in 2014. Magdalen is no longer with us, she died of cancer in 2019.

If Magdalen was alive today, would she recognize the GNOME organization? People are gradually coming to realize that the recent attacks on Dr Richard Stallman crossed far too many red lines. Working for a non-profit organization is a privilege and when certain GNOME employees attacked a volunteer, Dr Stallman, they undermined the principle of volunteering everywhere.

We already see people who signed the petition in the heat of the moment are asking to remove their names. The choice of the song's title is subject to debate. Are zombies the people trying to stamp out independent thought from leaders like Dr Stallman? Or are they the volunteers silenced by mindless groupthink?

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Dash to Panel Extension is Now Available for GNOME 40

Filed under
GNOME

The popular GNOME 40 extension - Dash to Panel is ported for GNOME 40. And you can now install it and experience the new look of your desktop.
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Ole Aamot: GNOME Internet Radio Locator version 11.10 with GeoClue Location View support

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GNOME

The latest release of GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11.10 finally features GeoClue Location View, since most people don’t live in Boston (wait a few seconds before your computer location is displayed on the map via GeoClue and click Zoom In/Zoom Out and drag on the map to see and listen to radio stations in the location map view. Click on the map marker labels to listen at your location or search with location text (for example “Cambridge, United Kingdom”) in the blank text input box to switch between the radio stations.

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is a Free Software program that allows you to easily locate Free Internet Radio stations by broadcasters on the Internet with the help of map and text search.

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is developed on the GNOME 40 desktop platform with GNOME Maps, GeoClue, libchamplain and geocode-lib and it requires at least GTK+ 3.0 and GStreamer 1.0 for audio playback.

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is available with map marker popups for Internet radio stations in 110 world cities as well as text-based location search for 187 Internet Radio stations in 102 world cities.

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Dash to Panel GNOME Shell Extension Turns GNOME 40 Into KDE Plasma or Windows 10

Filed under
GNOME

If you’ve been waiting for Dash to Dock to support GNOME 40, you’ll have to wait a little longer, but there’s another great extension that now supports the latest version of the popular desktop desktop environment, Dash to Panel, which is an icon taskbar for the GNOME Shell.

Once installed, Dash to Panel automatically moves GNOME’s Dash to the GNOME Panel, which is moved to the bottom of the screen to create a look similar to that of the KDE Plasma desktop environment or Windows 7 or later systems.

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Dash to Panel Extension Now Supports GNOME 40

Filed under
GNOME

The latest update to the perennially popular GNOME Shell extension introduces full support for the rejigged GNOME 40 desktop, including its horizontal workspace switcher and immersive app launcher.

I tried the release out on my Fedora install and I am pleased to say that most of Dash to Panel’s settings are present and working in GNOME 40 too. This includes intellihide, configurable panel colour and transparency, and on-hover window previews.

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Sovereignty on a Federated System: problems we faced on GNOME’s Matrix instance

Filed under
GNOME

This post follows an introduction to Matrix with e-mails, where I explain that Matrix is a federated system.

Federation can be either public or private. A public server can communicate with any other server, except the ones which are explicitely avoided. Meanwhile, a private server can only communicate with a selected list of other servers.

Private federation is often deployed between entities that can trust each other, for example between universites. There often are processes to take back control of things when they derail on a server you don’t manage, because people on the remote server are contractually bound with you.

But many organisations, and especially open source projets, deploy their instance in public federation. This means strangers from the Internet can interact with your server. Public federation comes with its own set of non-technical risks.

In this post I’m going to guide you through the problems we faced on our GNOME Matrix instance. For each problem I’ll bring a solution. They will be consolidated at the end of the post in the form of a target we want to reach eventually, along with the acknowledgement of the limits of what we can do. Please note that these problems have more to do with careful planning and deployment than with the Matrix protocol itself.

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