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GNOME

Shaun McCance: Discovery Docs Part 1: Discovering Why

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GNOME

This is Part 1 in a series about the Discovery Docs initiative, which I will present about in my upcoming GUADEC talk.

A long time ago, in the days of bonobos and fishes, GNOME documentation was written as long, monolithic manuals. We split these beasts into digestible pages as best we could (which is to say, poorly) and hoped for the best. Then we had an idea. What if we actually controlled the granularity at which information was presented? What if, instead of writing books, we wrote topics?

And so we did. We weren’t the first software project to make this shift, but we were early on the curve, and we did it radically. While many help systems still try to shoehorn topics into a linear structure, our help focuses on creating a navigable web of information.

The question of how big the topics are — how big the chunks on the web are — is entirely up to us. For the most part, we have chosen small topics with the least amount of information we could get away with. The reasoning is that users can find quick answers to questions, and if they want to learn more, we have extensive cross linking. Our topics have mostly followed the familiar trichotomy of tasks, concepts, and references. Our documentation is deliberately excruciatingly boring.

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GNOME 40 Lands in Ubuntu 21.10 Daily, This is What it Looks Like

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GNOME

A few folk were worried Ubuntu might not ship GNOME 40 at all in its upcoming release, but today’s batch of impish-proposed updates allay those fears completely.

GNOME 40 itself has been covered extensively on this blog (and plenty of others). So if you’re not familiar with it I do wonder where you’ve been! The key thing to know is that GNOME 40 introduces a new layout.

The first time you login to Ubuntu 21.10 you’re greeted by this screen...

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KDE and GNOME Developments, Changes

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KDE
GNOME

KDE

  • Mariam Fahmy GSoC’21 Week 2, 3 and 4: Finalizing learn decimals activities

    In this activity, a decimal number is displayed. the bar with the arrow represents a full unit, and each square in it represents one tenth of this unit, the kid has to drag the arrow to select a part of the bar, and drop the selected part into the empty area so that the number of dropped bars corresponds to the displayed decimal number.

    For every dropped bar, all bars are organized after 1 second from the drop action such that the kid can see the reorganization of bars, as a result we add a place for a 6th bar to have at most 5 full bars.

    The activity provides instruction tutorials on how to play with it, both vertical and horizontal layout are supported.

  • KDE Documentation & New Job at Nextcloud

    It also means I’m leaving my current part-time job at the KDE e.V. working on the documentation tooling. This was shorter than initially planned (a bit more than one month instead of three), but even though I didn’t finish doing everything I wanted to do, I still did a few things during this short time.

    First, I continued my previous work on develop.kde.org, making it possible for the translators to translate the content. For now, only the Kirigami tutorial is translated, but more should be available by simply toggling some switches.

    Another thing I worked on was phasing out docs.plasma-mobile.org. This website was created before develop.k.o was created and develop.k.o is nowadays a better place to add the plasma mobile developer documentation, next to the Kirigami and Plasma tutorials. The small bits of user documentation is getting moved to the plasma-mobile website.

    And also made some small improvements to KApiDox. I fixed the sorting of products to always include the KDE Frameworks and KDE PIM on top made the navbar consistent with develop.kde.org and a made a few other minor tweaks.

    Aside from that I also made many small patches to the API documentation itself in Ki ri ga mi, KGuiAddons, Plasma Workspace and a few other places.

    I will still be around and you can still ping me on Matrix for documentation tooling related questions Smile

    Thanks a lot to the KDE e.V. for entrusting me with this responsibility. If you want to help supports others and make KDE software better, consider donating to the KDE e.V.. The donation is tax-deductible in Germany (and maybe in other EU countries too).

GNOME

  • Christian Hergert: GtkSourceView Searching with PCRE2

    Last year I did some work to make GtkSourceView use PCRE2 for syntax highlighting. The primary motivation there was to improve syntax highlighting performance by using PCRE2’s JIT capability.

    However, that left us in an odd place with how GtkSourceSearchContext works for regex-enabled search. It was using GRegex which itself uses PCRE (1). It’s pretty clear that the goal is to completely deprecate GRegex in GLib and it’s days are numbered. In particular, there is a lot we can’t do to control the execution environment and protect against things like stack overflows. Worsening things, PCRE doesn’t appear to be maintained these days.

  • Maximiliano Sandoval: GSoC 2021 and GNOME Design tools

    This Google School of Code, I decided to work with Bilal Elmoussaoui as a mentor, the goal being updating some GNOME design tools to GTK 4, specifically Icon Library and App Icon Preview. Both apps are written in Rust and make use of the gtk-rs bindings for gtk.

GNOME 40.2 on Debian / Ubuntu – JHBuild GNOME Latest

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GNOME
Debian
Ubuntu

Official GNOME 40 for Debian and Ubuntu is coming. This is guide howto build GNOME 40.2 now and run it as your desktop environment. This is actually a bit more than just building exact GNOME 40 Desktop, this is your Swiss Army Knife to build latest GNOME packages when you want and survival pack to help you live on bleeding edge. GNOME 40 is, of course, a major release, but also all minor releases GNOME 40.1 / 40.2 / 40.3 / 40.4 / 40.5 / 40.6. brings something new. Also GNOME 41 is coming in October 2021 https://wiki.gnome.org/FortyOne.

If you are ‘one-click man’, ‘looking always easiest way to do something’ and ‘wonder why I have to do something more than just click somewhere to get something’, then this is definitely not for you. Even if all the planets are in just the right position, this will still take a while and this is so much complicated than one click. You maybe will see errors and you might have to learn something new, but if you still want to run latest and greatest GNOME on Debian or Ubuntu, then this guide is for you.

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Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Dark & light style selector in To Do

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GNOME

There’s a lot to be done to make To Do actually useful. The inbox view is essentially useless as it is right now. It really needs more system-wide integration points. The week view could be more engaging and time-oriented than it currently is. I would like to add a command bar too, at some point.

However, we haven’t seen new designs for some time now, and To Do is off from designers’ spotlight for many years now. If you’re design-oriented, we could really use your help!

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First Look: GNOME’s Default Theme is Getting a Revamp

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GNOME

The changes to Adwaita sound relatively minor in isolation — no borders on buttons, no background colour on header bars — but together they outfit GTK apps with a much brighter, lighter look than the current version do.

In design documents to demo the overall form of the new look GNOME’s Tobias Bernard lists the following key changes as being required...

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Kai A. Hiller: Search Bar of Doom

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GNOME

It started benign, it was labeled Newcomers, it felt like a good start into the Fractal NEXT codebase: Make Ctrl+K toggle the room search bar… I was so naive!

This first issue took me days. It was a task where the high-level idea is very easy, but the concrete idiomatic and robust solution is non-obvious. What followed was a lot of reading and learning of the concepts and the concrete application of general GTK4, its UI Builder, shortcut handling, GActions and GObject bindings.

[...]

I spent the next days learning more about the GTK4 and Adwaita widgets, as well as the inner workings of the Fractal NEXT codebase, toying around with some code.

Based on the room setting design of our trusted GNOME designer Tobias, I started working on turning the pictures into something interactive. For the design I wanted to stay close to the libadwaita widgets and their intended use, so that it gives GNOME users a consistent experience and we can get all the shiny features like searchable preferences for free. The result does in some aspects deviate from the draft, e.g. the members overview got its own tab, but the overall reaction from the community to it was positive. I expect we will go through some iterations before the room settings UI is actually finished – after all: nothing will break your code faster than getting it into the hands of actual users..

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GNOME Desktop/GTK: gtk-rs and GSoC

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GNOME
  • Sophie Herold: New gtk-rs release and more

    The latest gtk-rs release is officially available since today. The perfect time to explain some of the contributions I made.

  • Ivan Molodetskikh: GSoC 2021: GNOME Shell Screenshot UI

    Hello! I’m Ivan Molodetskikh, a computer science student from Moscow, Russia.

    I’ve been involved in GNOME starting from my GSoC 2018 project to port librsvg filters to Rust. Throughout the last year in GNOME I’ve been doing some work to reduce input latency in Mutter, the GNOME’s compositor (by implementing the presentation-time Wayland protocol and adding dynamic render time computation). I’ve also created two small apps, Video Trimmer and Identity.

    As part of this year’s Google Summer of Code, I’m implementing a new screenshot UI in GNOME Shell.

  • Nishit Patel: GSoC Project update

    Following the proposed schedule, I began working on the first milestone, i.e Adding support for creation time in tracker-miners. While building the tracker-miner I discovered crashes in the indexer. After taking some help from mentors and debugging, It was found that a double-free bug in the indexer was causing the crash. As the piece of code was unused, it went unnoticed.

  • GSoC project @Pitivi~Cut Mode.

    The Idea for this project is to have two timelines to ease certain types of tasks and increase productivity. This will essentially bring in a non-zoomable Timeline which will serve to ease the task of trimming, cutting, rearranging clips on the timeline in sync with the other timeline.

Christian Hergert: Performance Improvements in Text Editing

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GNOME

I realize I don’t blog much these days, but I do try to keep my Twitter filled with screenshots as I work on GNOME.

Recently I spent some time doing another round of performance improvements in GtkSourceView.

Much work this cycle has focused on submitting work to the GPU more efficiently. For example, Matthias Clasen taught the new OpenGL renderer to submit colors along with glyph vertices so that it could have fewer GL uniform updates along with fewer program switches. This has had the effect of letting us batch common GtkTextView usage into a single glDrawArrays() submission. Great stuff!

I’ve been striving to reach 144hz text scrolling ever since a kind GNOME contributor sent me a 144hz monitor to test with. So with the new bits in place, I took another look at what was slowing us down.

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GNOME Internet Radio Locator version 11.12 with GeoClue 2.0 Location Services

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GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is a Free Software program that allows you to easily locate Free Internet Radio stations by broadcasters on the Internet with the help of map and text search.

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is developed on the GNOME 40 desktop platform with GNOME Maps, GeoClue, libchamplain and geocode-lib and it requires at least GTK+ 3.0 and GStreamer 1.0 for audio playback.

GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11 for GNOME 40 is available with map marker popups for Internet radio stations in 110 world cities as well as text-based location search for 187 Internet Radio stations in 102 world cities.

You can either zoom/click on the map marker popups to listen to a station or enter city names in the GUI search input field in order to locate radio stations in the city using the text search with auto-completion.

Wait a few seconds to see your current location on the map in the GNOME Internet Radio Locator application.

You must enable Location Services to run GNOME Internet Radio Locator 11.

To enable Location Services in GNOME 40, navigate to the Settings app and choose Privacy/Location Services and make sure Location Services is checked.

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