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GNOME

Scalable lists in GTK 4

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GNOME

One of the last big missing pieces in GTK 4 is the infrastructure for new list and grid widgets. It has just been merged and is included in the 3.98.5 release. So it is time to take a closer look.

Since ancient times (ie GTK 2), GtkTreeView has been the go-to data display widget in GTK. It uses a model-view pattern to keep the data separate from the display infrastructure. Over the years, it has grown a grid-display sibling (GtkIconView) and a selection cousin (GtkComboBox), using the same infrastructure (tree models and cell renderers).

Unfortunately, the approach taken for rendering in GtkTreeView with cell renderers left us with a schism: widgets use one set of vfuncs and technologies for size allocation and rendering, and cell renderers use another. One of the unfortunate consequences of this split is that it is very hard to do animations in tree views (since cell renderers don’t keep state). Another is that most of the advances of the GTK CSS rendering machinery are unavailable in cell renderers.

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Yaru Colors Updated With Ubuntu 20.04 Yaru Theme In 12 Colors (GTK, Icons, GNOME Shell, More)

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GNOME

The colors available with this theme pack are aqua, blue, brown, deep blue, green, grey, MATE (uses the Ubuntu MATE green), orange, pink, purple, red and yellow. The themes are available in light, dark and regular (mixed) variants, just as Yaru is available in Ubuntu 20.04. There are also light and dark GNOME Shell themes.

These are Yaru DarkBlue in regular and dark variants, and the Yaru Purple theme light variant...

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KDE and GNOME GSoC Projects (Students Introduced)

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Status report: Week 1

    Hey all! This is my first report of the project’s Coding Period.

  • Coding officially begins

    Today, the Community bonding period finally ended and GSoC’s three months coding period officially begins.

    In the last month, I made myself more familiar with git, qml and javascript. As KDE including Gcompris has been moved to Gitlab so I also changed the configuration of my local repository accordingly and tested it. I read codes of almost all the activities (hope I didn’t miss any) and I am quite comfortable with all now.

  • Basic Subtitling Support in Kdenlive – GSoC ’20

    A month ago I was selected to participate as a student in Google Summer of Code with Kdenlive. The Community Bonding period is coming to an end and the coding period will soon commence.

    In this post, I am going to talk about what the project is about, how I plan to implement it, and what all I have done in the community bonding period to ensure a smooth and bump-free coding period.

  • Chinmay Gurjar: Chapter 1: A New Tale Begins

    It was around 23:25(IST) on the 4th of May, my brother and I were glued to our phone screens, the GSoC webpage open, eagerly waiting for the results (he was visibly the more excited one). And BAM! 23:31, I saw my name on the GSoC website. Then followed a tsunami of “congratulations”. I’ve been accepted into GSoC to work with GNOME.

    I applied for the Music project under GNOME. I’ve always fancied music, making music and now I wanted to make a music player to play that music. So, when I saw the Music listed for GSoC, I knew, I just knew that it was the “one”. I started contributing to the project and made some minor fixes, here and there. Those fixes taught me a lot about open source.

  • S Sai Vineet: GSoC 2020 with GNOME: a beginning

    I have been accepted into Google Summer of Code 2020 with GNOME Foundation!
    I am grateful to my mentor albfan and the whole GNOME developer community to have helped me become capable enough to tackle this project. Can’t wait to get my hands dirty and become a strong member of the GNOME community!

  • Adwait Rawat: GSoC 2020, Let’s GO!

    On 5th May 2020, I got an email from google, stating that I got accepted as a participant for Google Summer of Code 2020. The organisation I applied to was GNOME.

    Reason being, I have been contributing to GNOME since early 2019 to various projects such as gitg, libgit2-glib, GNOME Games etc. These contributions were usually minor fixes, but ended up being very educational for someone who was new to open-source.

  • Mariana Pícolo: The beginning of a journey with GNOME on Google Summer of Code

    I'm so excited to announce that I'm being part of Summer of Code 2020 with GNOME!

    In this post, I'll talk about my experience during the student application period.

  • Nour E-Din ElNhass: The Journey Begins

    Hello everyone, This is the first post in my blog of many up coming posts that will be documenting my journey through the open source world as I’ve been accepted to GSoC internship for 2020, contributing to Gnome organization. I’ll try to document every little detail as possible to try to give the same experience I had.

    So, who am I ? you may be wondering !!

    As said on the home page, I am Nour E-Din, an undergrad student, my first contribution to and open source application was to Evolution. Evolution is the official personal information manager for GNOME.It combines e-mail, address book, calendar, task list and note-taking features. It has been maintained for years, had developed a lot and has many users who use it daily.

  • Apoorv Sachan: The first Contribution, GNOME & GSoC

    Well, why the ants ? Think teamwork, think team effort, interdependent efforts, voluntary involvement, the easy stuff, the hard stuff, the small and the large stuff, they all do it together, collectively and end up making what all of us call an ant-hill. A self sustaining ecosystem capable of supporting various ants, queen ant,the female workers, and male ants and the baby ants of-course. Who will in-turn help build a bigger ant-hill bootstrapped upon its previous design and so on into the future . . . .

    Well enough said about ants ! You get where I am going !

    This post is about how I came to contribute to an open-source project, got started on a journey I had been looking forward to since ever.

  • Nour E-Din ElNhass: The first steps

    It’s already been 3 weeks since I’ve received my acceptance email to GSoC internship. I am going to explain what progress have been made during this time and what I am willing on achieving on the upcoming days .

POP!_OS Delivers Outstanding GNOME Experience

Filed under
OS
GNOME
Reviews

System76 regularly updates this distro without requiring constant reinstallation. The developer updates POP!_OS on a rolling release cycle.

The operating system gets updates, security patches and updated releases as they are ready. Rolling releases ensure that you never have to handle ISO installations again with configuring settings to recreate the same look and feel of the current version.

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Cinnamon 4.6 Arrives with Fractional Scaling, Nemo Improvements, and More

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GNOME

Announced earlier this year in January, the Cinnamon 4.6 desktop environment saw the light of day a couple of weeks ago. While there’s no official announcement for this major release, I did some digging to highlight the most important changes.

Probably the biggest new feature of Cinnamon 4.6 is support for fractional scaling on HiDPI/4K displays. The feature was finally implemented in the Display Settings panel under the Zoom Level drop-down.

Users will be able to choose values between 100% and 200%, such as 125%, 150%, 175%, for each of the connected monitors. Also in the Display Settings panel there’s now the ability to change the frequency of monitors.

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GNOME Devs Make Major Improvements to the Apps Grid

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GNOME

Since GNOME 3.38 is on house to ship in Ubuntu 20.10 (barring any tradition-flattening calamities …Which, given how things are going atm, is a distinct possibility) these are changes which you and I, as Ubuntu users, will likely benefit from come October.

So what’s cooking?

First up: the Applications screen drops the “Frequents” button that sira at the bottom of the grid. The apps grid is now just a single, vertically scrolling pane of application icons arranged in alphabetical order by default.

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GNOME Foundation Elections and Report

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GNOME
  • Looking for candidates for the 2020 GNOME Foundation elections

    I forgot to write this a few days ago; I hope it is not too late.

    The GNOME Foundation's elections for the Board are coming up, and we are looking for candidates. Of the 7 directors, we are replacing 4, and the 3 remaining positions remain for another year. You could be one of those four.

    I would like it very much if there were candidates and directors that fall outside the box of "white male programmer"; it is unfortunate that for the current Board we ended up with all dudes. GNOME has a Code of Conduct to make it a good place to be.

  • Se buscan candidat@s para las elecciones 2020 de la Fundación de GNOME
  • GNOME Foundation Board of Directors: a Year in Review

    The 2020 elections for the GNOME Foundation Board of Directors are underway, so it’s a good time to look back over the past 12 months and see what the current board has been up to. This is intended as a general update for members of the GNOME project, as well as a potential motivator for those who might be interested in running in the election!

Silverblue: pretty good family OS

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

I’m the go-to IT guy in the family, so my relatives rely on me when it comes to computers and software on them. In the past I also helped them with computers with Windows and macOS, but at some point I just gave up. I don’t know those systems well enough to effectively administer them and I don’t even have much interest in them. So I asked them to decide: you either use Linux which I know and can effectively help you with or ask someone else for help.

Long story short: I (mostly remotely) support quite a few Fedora (Linux of my choice) users in my family now. It’s a fairly easy task. Usually after I set up the machine I don’t hear from the user very often. Just once 6 months and a year typically when I visit them I upgrade the machine to the new release and check whether everything works. But Fedora upgrades became so easy and reliable that recently I usually just found out that they had already done it by themselves.

But there was still one recurring problem: even though they performed upgrades because it was probably a big enough thing to catch their attention they didn’t act on normal updates and I often found them with outdated applications such as Firefox.

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App Icon Preview 2.0.0 released

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GNOME

App Icon Preview is the very first utility made by the GNOME Design Tooling team, created originally by Zander Brown a year ago. Since then, we have been crafting other small yet useful utilities for the GNOME design team.

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Patent case against GNOME resolved

Filed under
GNOME
Legal

Today, on the 20th of May 2020, the GNOME Foundation, Rothschild Patent Imaging, and Leigh M. Rothschild are pleased to announce that the patent dispute between Rothschild Patent Imaging and GNOME has been settled.

In this walk-away settlement, GNOME receives a release and covenant not to be sued for any patent held by Rothschild Patent Imaging. Further, both Rothschild Patent Imaging and Leigh Rothschild are granting a release and covenant to any software that is released under an existing Open Source Initiative approved license (and subsequent versions thereof), including for the entire Rothschild portfolio of patents, to the extent such software forms a material part of the infringement allegation.

Neil McGovern, Executive Director for the GNOME Foundation said “I’m exceptionally pleased that we have concluded this case. This will allow us to refocus our attention on creating a free software desktop, and will ensure certainty for all free and open source software in future.”

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: picolibc, Elixir, Perl, Java, and Python

  • Picolibc Updates

    I thought work on picolibc would slow down at some point, but I keep finding more things that need work. I spent a few weeks working in libm and then discovered some important memory allocation bugs in the last week that needed attention too. [...] Szabolcs Nagy and Wilco Dijkstra's work in the last few years has been to improve the performance of some of the core math functions, which is much appreciated. They've adopted a more modern coding style (C99) and written faster code at the expense of a larger memory foot print. One interesting choice was to use double computations for the float implementations of various functions. This makes these functions shorter and more accurate than versions done using float throughout. However, for machines which don't have HW double, this pulls in soft double code which adds considerable size to the resulting binary and slows down the computations, especially if the platform does support HW float. The new code also takes advantage of HW fused-multiply-add instructions. Those offer more precision than a sequence of primitive instructions, and so the new code can be much shorter as a result.

  • Josef Strzibny: Soft dependencies in Elixir projects

    How to support soft dependencies in Elixir libraries to provide optional features without any dependency baggage?

  • 8 + 1 things to get you started with the Elixir’s interactive shell (IEx)

    Are you coming to Elixir from another language with an interactive shell? There are a few specific things about Elixir’s interactive shell (IEx) to keep an eye on and make ourselves more efficient. Here they are.

  • The [Perl] Weekly Challenge #073

    For the first time, I have joined the private Early Bird Club and taking the advantage of doing the challenge before the launch. I am not sure, if you noticed, this I shared by solutions before lunch time on day one. I did both tasks in Perl, Raku and Swift. I really wanted to add Java to the list as well but then dropped the at the last moment and took day off instead. But that doesn’t mean, I won’t attempt again in the coming weeks. Having done Raku for some time now, I am getting the hang of it. In fact, I am enjoying it to be honest. I no longer ask stupid Raku questions on the official Twitter handle. Instead I rely on my notes that I have been collecting all along. They are very handy when I am stuck. Another thing that helped me a lot is the Live Video Raku Review by Andrew Shitov. I learnt a lot by watching how he test the code. He makes difficult things easier to understand.

  • Micronaut 2.0 Full-Stack Java Framework Released

    Object Computing, Inc., has just announced the latest release of Micronaut, its JVM-based, full-stack Java framework. Developed by the creators of the Grails framework, Micronaut was designed to provide developers with a polyglot tool for building modular, easily testable JVM applications with the Java, Kotlin, and Groovy languages. Micronaut 2.0, available now, works with such frameworks as Spring and Grails to run in scenarios such as serverless functions, Android apps, or low memory-footprint microservices. The latest version has been updated to support JDK 14, Groovy 3, and reactive frameworks such as RxJava 3 and Reactor. The Micronaut framework uses Java's annotation processors, which work with any JVM language that supports them, as well as an HTTP server and client built on the Netty non-blocking I/O client server framework. To provide a programming model similar to Spring and Grails, these annotation processors pre-compile the required metadata to perform DI, define AOP proxies, and configure applications to run in a low-memory environment, the company says. Many of the APIs in Micronaut were "heavily inspired" by Spring and Grails," which was by design and aids in bringing developers up to speed quickly," the company says.

  • Python Bitwise Operators

    Bitwise operators and bit manipulation are like recursion in that they are both topics that are fundamental to computing, yet the amount of use you will make of them will vary gratly depending on your domain. Bit manipulation is certainly important for job interviews at companies like the "bigN" (Google, FB, etc.) and other places where a deep knowledge of fundamentals is expected and required. It is also an very important when working with embedded systems, and some other areas as shown below.

  • Adding Robots.txt file to Django Application

    Robots.txt is a standard used by websites to communicate with web crawlers and other web robots. The standard specifies how to inform the web robot about which areas of the website should not be processed or scanned.

  • Server Access Logging in Django using middleware

    Some application admins need to know which user performed what action in the application. We also felt the need of such tracking hence we started developing the access log system for our application. In this article, we will see how to develop the server access logging app for the Django project.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxl) stackoverflow python report

Android Leftovers

Best Kali Linux Alternatives

A system based on security is a great approach for hackers, as it can immediately detect any defects and weaknesses in a computer or network. Linux is the most commonly used operating system among hackers. Various Linux hacking distributions consist of several tools used to improve the security of the network. Kali Linux is one of the best distributions, and alternative Linux distributions come with different advanced features. This article will discuss some of the best Kali Linux alternatives used by hackers. Read more

Cantor 20.08

Our developers are adding some usability improvements to Cantor and some initial results from GSoC projects are now available with the 20.08 release. For example, now you can collapse, uncollapse, and remove all results from the worksheet; exclude entries from the worksheet commands processing; add actions for selected texts; zoom widgets; get tooltips for almost all settings options; use the new horizontal rule entry; and more. Read more