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GNOME

Martín Abente Lahaye: Portfolio 0.9.11

Filed under
Software
GNOME

On the visuals department, this new release brings a refreshed icon by @jimmac, which looks fantastic and takes it closer to the modern art style in GNOME.

Regarding features, well, there’s quite a lot. The most noticeable one is the Trash folder.

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Which Linux Desktop Should You Use? KDE vs. GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME

One of the first things you learn about Linux is that what you see on your screen doesn't always match what you see on someone else's. The interface, the way you interact with your PC, is often completely different even though you're both using the same operating system.

Windows and macOS both have one interface or desktop environment. Linux has many, and two of the most popular are KDE and GNOME. But how do you choose between them?

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KDE and GTK/GNOME

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GSoC 2021 KMyMoney - Post First Evals to Week 7

    I modified the code as suggested by my mentors that were related to coding conventions(according to C++, Qt and KDE).

    After adding the new members to the AlkOnlineQuoteSource constructor. I jumped into writing the unit tests. I realized that I haven’t added the new members in the function signature. After adding that, I build the files to check what all things break related to the constructor’s usage.

  • Peter Hutterer: libinput and hold gestures

    Thanks to the work done by Josè Expòsito, libinput 1.19 will ship with a new type of gesture: Hold Gestures. So far libinput supported swipe (moving multiple fingers in the same direction) and pinch (moving fingers towards each other or away from each other). These gestures are well-known, commonly used, and familiar to most users. For example, GNOME 40 recently has increased its use of touchpad gestures to switch between workspaces, etc. Swipe and pinch gestures require movement, it was not possible (for callers) to detect fingers on the touchpad that don't move.

    This gap is now filled by Hold gestures. These are triggered when a user puts fingers down on the touchpad, without moving the fingers. This allows for some new interactions and we had two specific ones in mind: hold-to-click, a common interaction on older touchscreen interfaces where holding a finger in place eventually triggers the context menu. On a touchpad, a three-finger hold could zoom in, or do dictionary lookups, or kill a kitten. Whatever matches your user interface most, I guess.

    The second interaction was the ability to stop kinetic scrolling. libinput does not actually provide kinetic scrolling, it merely provides the information needed in the client to do it there: specifically, it tells the caller when a finger was lifted off a touchpad at the end of a scroll movement. It's up to the caller (usually: the toolkit) to implement the kinetic scrolling effects. One missing piece was that while libinput provided information about lifting the fingers, it didn't provide information about putting fingers down again later - a common way to stop scrolling on other systems.

  • Christian Hergert: Ignoring GtkTextTag when printing

    Previously, If you wanted to do this, you had to remove all your tags and then print, only to restore them afterwards. This should be a lot more convenient for people writing various GtkSourceView-based text editors. Although, I’m suspect many of them weren’t even doing this correctly to begin with, hence this PSA.

Get macOS ‘Quick Look’ on Ubuntu with GNOME Sushi

Filed under
Mac
GNOME
Ubuntu

Sometimes file thumbnails in Nautilus aren’t enough. Sometimes you need a closer look at a file, photo, or folder to make sure it’s the one you actually want, but without the hassle of opening a full-blown app to find out.

And that’s where GNOME Sushi comes in.

GNOME Sushi is an alternative to macOS ‘Quick Look‘ for Linux desktops that use Nautilus, aka GNOME’s famous file manager.

You select a file in Nautilus, tap the spacebar, and an instantaneous (and usually interactive) preview of the file appears — no need to open a full app.

Sushi supports file previews for most plain-text documents, including scripts with syntax highlighting, as well PDFs, HTML files, and LibreOffice documents. Music and video file previews use the GStreamer framework to let you to seek/scrub through them.

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What’s New in GNOME 40?

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 40 has more than a new numbering scheme. Along with its new look comes a new way of working. The old vertical metaphors are gone, replaced by horizontal theming and layouts. Let’s take a closer look.

[...]

The GNOME developers aren’t locked into standard desktop norms and conventions. They’ll happily revisit any aspect of the desktop and work through it to solve a problem. That might mean burrowing into the code and fixing the issue at its root, or it might mean replacing that item with something new. There are no sacred cows.

They’re also against providing too many options and preferences. This might seem to fly in the face of the Linux mantra of choice and flexibility. Tobias calls out to an earlier piece by Havoc Pennington, one of the original GNOME developers and chair of the GNOME Foundation board for its first two years. This describes GNOME’s “fewer preferences is better” principle. You might find some of the things that you want to change are now fixed in place.

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Also: How to install Gnome 40 in Ubuntu 21.04

Tim Lauridsen: Pimp your Gtk application with CSS

Filed under
Development
GNOME

GTK is a powerful framework for building GUI application in Linux and other OSes. It is written in C, but there is binding for many programing languages like Python.

GTK uses a subset of CSS for styling your application. I have made a little Python Demo Application to show how to pimp your application like a pimp.

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GUADEC 2021 Online Conference Kicks Off for the GNOME 41 Desktop Environment

Filed under
GNOME

GUADEC 2021 is the second conference to take place online as a virtual event instead of a physical venue, and that’s because the COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting us. However, the best part about virtual conferences is that it won’t cost you a dime and you can join from the comfort of your living room.

GUADEC 2021 is for shaping up the future of the GNOME desktop environment, especially the upcoming GNOME 41 release, as GNOME users and developers from all over the world will gather together to share their knowledge and discuss the new features and changes.

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8 Best Icon Themes for Ubuntu (2021 Edition)

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Feast your eyes on the following set of exceptional icon themes that you can use on Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and pretty much every Linux distro out there.

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How Calls became a part of GNOME

Filed under
GNOME

Since Purism’s philosophy and GNOME’s principles are closely aligned it is not far fetched to call them a match made in heaven.

As you probably know the software stack in use on the Librem 5 is built upon GNOME technologies and has been designed by parts the GNOME Design Team.

This is why we’re happy to officially announce that Calls will become a part of the GNOME project. Having a dialer application available shows that mobile is an important use case for GNOME.
Furthermore this shows that we take upstreaming our development efforts and making them available to the wider community very seriously.

The old repository has been archived and the new repository where development takes place can be found here while the packaging for PureOS can be found here.

By moving to GNOME infrastructure we hope to generate more community interest around Calls.

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GNOME 40.3 Released with Improvements to GNOME Software, Many Bug Fixes

Filed under
GNOME

Coming about five weeks after the GNOME 40.2 release, GNOME 40.3 is here with an updated GNOME Software app that now automatically installs application updates depending on the type of application and user configuration, includes apps from disabled repositories in the search results of the Activities Overview, an improved Updates tab, as well as better support for PackageKit apps.

The Evince document viewer has been updated as well to display “None” when the creation or modification date is missing from a document, as well as to enable the Odd Pages Left option only when the dual page feature is active. Also, the GNOME Boxes app received improvements to the run-in-background functionaly for non-Flatpak builds.

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