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GNOME

GNOME 3.33.90 released

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GNOME

>Hi developers and testers,

GNOME 3.33.90 is now available, slightly ahead of schedule for a change!

This is the first beta release for GNOME 3.34. To ensure the quality of the final release, we have entered feature freeze, UI freeze, and API freeze, so now is a good time for distributors planning to ship GNOME 3.34 to start testing the packages.

If you want to compile GNOME 3.33.90, you can use the official BuildStream project snapshot. Thanks to BuildStream's build sandbox, it should build reliably for you regardless of your host system:

https://download.gnome.org/teams/releng/3.33.90/gnome-3.33.90.tar.xz

The list of updated modules and changes is available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.90/NEWS

The source packages are available here:

https://download.gnome.org/core/3.33/3.33.90/sources/

WARNING!
--------
This release is a snapshot of development code. Although it is buildable and usable, it is primarily intended for testing and hacking purposes. GNOME uses odd minor version numbers to indicate development status.

For more information about 3.33, the full schedule, the official module lists and the proposed module lists, please see our 3.33 wiki page:

https://www.gnome.org/start/unstable

Michael

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Also: GNOME 3.34 Beta Released - Now Under UI/Feature/API/ABI Freezes

App Grid in GNOME Shell

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GNOME

During the London UX Hackfest, in 2017, GNOME designers and developers had many interesting ideas about different ways to organize GNOME Shell’s UI elements. Letting designers create freely, without having to consider toolkit limitations or time constraints, can produce wonderful results!

It is interesting to notice that many of these ideas floated around the concept of an user-customizable application grid.

In fact, such kind of application grid exists in Endless OS (which by itself is loosely inspired by how smartphones do that) and our user research has shown that it improves discoverability. New users that are presented to Endless OS can easily and quickly navigate through the OS.

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Another GNOME Improvement Being Discussed To Help With Touchpad Scrolling / Tablets

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GNOME

Daniel has volleyed a new patch under discussion for only queuing compressible events within Mutter's Clutter stage code. In doing so, this lowers the input latency for incompressible events such as touchpad scrolling and drawing tablets. The impact is that those scrolling / drawing tablet events can arrive as much as one frame sooner than the current code. Beyond the lower latency, the incompressible events should be smoother / less bursts as a result.

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Welcome to the Inclusion and Diversity Team at GNOME!

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GNOME

The Inclusion and Diversity team at GNOME was created to encourage and empower staff and volunteers, and to create an environment within GNOME where people from all backgrounds can thrive.

We welcome and encourage participation by everyone. To us, it doesn’t matter how you identify yourself or how others perceive you: we welcome you.

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GNOME and KDE work together on the Linux desktop

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KDE
GNOME

The Linux desktop has its fans -- I've been using it for over twenty-years -- but it's never been a mass market favorite. In part, that's because as Linus Torvalds says, "fragmentation of the different vendors have held the desktop back." Now, in a major step forward the two chief Linux desktop rivals, GNOME Foundation and KDE, have agreed to work together.

GNOME and KDE are coming together to sponsor the Linux App Summit (LAS) 2019 in Barcelona from November 12th to 15th, 2019. This isn't the first time the two rival Linux desktop groups have come together, but it has been a decade since they've joined forces to run a conference together. Both organizations are eager to bring their communities together to build an application ecosystem that transcends individual distros and broadens the market for everyone.

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Original:

  • GNOME and KDE to co-host the Linux App Summit in November
    For Immediate Release
    
    The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. are proud to announce Linux App Summit 2019. 
    The Linux App Summit (LAS) will be held in Barcelona from November 12th to 
    15th, 2019.
    
     https://linuxappsummit.org/
    
    LAS is the first collaborative event co-hosted by the two organizations since 
    the Desktop Summit in 2009. Both organizations are eager to bring their 
    communities together in building an application ecosystem that transcends 
    individual distros and broadens the market for everyone involved. 
    
    KDE and GNOME will no longer be taking a passive role in the free desktop 
    sector. With the joint influence of the two desktop projects, LAS will shepherd 
    the growth of the FOSS desktop by encouraging the creation of quality 
    applications, seeking opportunities for compensation for FOSS developers, and 
    fostering a vibrant market for the Linux operating system.
    
    GNOME's executive director, Neil McGovern says, "LAS represents one of many 
    steps towards a thriving desktop ecosystem. By partnering with KDE we show the 
    desire  to build the kind of application ecosystem that demonstrates that Open 
    Source and Free Software are important; the technology and organization we 
    build to achieve this is valuable and necessary.", LAS will be the 
    intersection where application developers, designers, user and kernel space 
    engineers work together in building an environment that aims to create a new 
    market for applications on Linux.
    
    "Over the years we have built great solutions that millions of people use 
    around the world. It's been when we have worked together that we have managed 
    to become bigger than the sum of the parts. Together with GNOME, counting with 
    the collaboration of many distributions and application developers, we'll have 
    the opportunity to work side by side, share our perspectives and offer the 
    platform that the next generation of solutions will be built on.", Aleix Pol 
    Gonzalez, KDE e.V Vice-President says about the inaugural effort about LAS.
    
    As the first conference of its kind, the themes LAS will be centered around 
    will be growing the application ecosystem for Linux as well as providing a 
    platform for others to share ideas and technology. With that in mind, the 
    topics we are interested in are:
        
    * Creating, packaging, and distributing applications
    * Design and usability
    * Commercialization
    * Community / Legal
    * Platform
    * Linux App Ecosystem
    
    The CfP starts today and ends on August 31st.  You may submit your talk ideas 
    at https://linuxappsummit.org/cfp/.
    
    
    "I am excited to see GNOME and KDE working together on LAS, and I believe that 
    the event will help lay down strong foundations for collaborative cross-
    project development that would benefit Linux users across all distributions and 
    on any compatible device. I hope to see widespread community support for the 
    event and, as a user, I look forward to reaping the benefits of the seeds that 
    have now been sown." - Christel Dahlskjaer, Private Internet Access and 
    freenode Project Lead.
    
    We look forward to seeing all of you in Barcelona and building the app 
    ecosystem together! For more information about LAS, please visit - https://
    linuxappsummit.org/.
    
    About KDE e.V
    
    The KDE® Community is a free software community dedicated to creating an open 
    and user-friendly computing experience, offering an advanced graphical desktop, 
    a wide variety of applications for communication, work, education and 
    entertainment and a platform of libraries and frameworks that helps developers 
    easily build new applications. We have a strong focus on finding innovative 
    solutions to old and new problems, creating a dynamic atmosphere open for 
    experimentation. Find out more about KDE at https://kde.org
    
    About GNOME Foundation
    
    The GNOME Foundation is an organization committed to supporting the 
    advancement of GNOME, comprised of hundreds of volunteer developers and 
    industry-leading companies. The Foundation is a member directed, 501(c)(3) 
    non-profit organization that provides financial, organizational, and legal 
    support to the GNOME project. The GNOME Foundation is supporting the pursuit 
    of software freedom through the innovative, accessible, and beautiful user 
    experience created by GNOME contributors around the world. More information 
    about GNOME and the GNOME Foundation can be found at www.gnome.org and 
    foundation.gnome.org. Become a friend of GNOME at https://www.gnome.org/
    friends/
    -- 
    Promotion & Communication
    
  • GNU: GIMP, Guix and Fonts in GNOME

    Filed under
    GNU
    GNOME
    • The best Photoshop alternatives for 2019, from Affinity Photo to GIMP

      While there are a handful of free Photoshop alternatives, the open source program GIMP comes closest to Photoshop’s advanced tools. As an open source program, GIMP is free to download for Mac, Windows and Linux.

      GIMP, which stands for GNU Image Manipulation Program, has several of the same tools as Photoshop. Layer editing is possible, which allows GIMP to do more than just a basic crop and color edit. Many advanced edits, like local adjustment, blemish corection, and object removal, can be easily tackled inside the open source program. While other free programs will crop, recolor and apply filters, GIMP offers enough advanced tools to be considered a true Photoshop competitor.

      Of course, a free program is never on par with a paid industry standard. While GIMP contains most of the same most-used tools, it’s lacking a few features. The healing brush, for example, has one option where Photoshop’s brush has four. GIMP also does not have non-destructive adjustment layer editing, where the changes can be reverted or altered later without affecting the rest of the edit. GIMP also tends to be behind Photoshop’s latest new tools, with some new options not arriving to the free program to years later. GIMP also isn’t as much of a graphic design program as Photoshop — CMYK support, for example, is not included.

      The GIMP user interface is either great or not so great, depending on how you look at it. As an open source format, the UI isn’t as professional and sleek as Photoshop’s. However, since there aren’t quite as many tools, the program can feel slightly less daunting, and also allows for more customization options.

      GIMP can’t replace every Photoshop feature exactly, but it’s the open source program that comes the closest to the Adobe powerhouse, with a free price tag. Learn more about how it compares in our Photoshop versus GIMP comparison.

    • ‘Building’ Bitcoin’s Software Just Got a Bit More Trustless

      Like it or not, there’s a bit of trust involved in the process of setting up, or “compiling,” the software at the heart of bitcoin – but a recent code change could help.

      Featuring container software Guix, code was recently merged into the most popular bitcoin implementation, Bitcoin Core, meaning it’s now ready for real users to try out. The change could help to limit trust in code downloaded from operating system Ubuntu during the building process.

      “It’s been quite a journey, but #Guix support for deterministic, bootstrappable Bitcoin Core builds has landed in master,” the main developer behind the project, Carl Dong, tweeted last month.

    • Bitcoin Sees Changes on Linux To Improve Security

      While Bitcoin might be an extremely pro-privacy and trustless process, building something like it is quite the opposite and the element of trust is required when setting up.

      A new container software using code that was recently merged into the most popular Bitcoin implementation, Bitcoin core changes this, to make it easier to build code, making the process a little more trustless. The change could help to limit trust in code downloaded from the operating system Ubuntu during the building process. For this building process, there are already some protections built in. When downloading Bitcoin Core from Bitcoin.org, many developers use a process called Gitian to make so-called “reproducible” builds, which allows developers to double check that the binaries being distributed to them are the correct version that they want to be downloading – not a replica with a secret backdoor built into the software, say, to steal bitcoins.

    • Metafont-inspired font design using nonlinear constraint optimization and Webassembly

      Modern fonts work by drawing the outline of each letter out by hand. This is a very labour-intensive operation as each letter has to be redrawn for each weight. Back in the late 70s Donald Knuth created METAFONT, which has a completely different approach that mimics the way letters are drawn by hand. In this system you specify a pen shape and a stroke path. The computer would then calculate what sort of a mark this stroke would leave on paper and draw the result. The pen shape as well as the stroke were defined as mathematical equations of type "the stroke shall begin so that its topmost part is exactly at x-height and shall end so that its bottom is at the baseline".

      The advantage of this approach is that it is fully parametrizable. If you change the global x-height, then every letter is automatically recalculated. Outline fonts can't be slanted by shearing because it changes the strokes' widths. Parametric fonts do not have this issue. Different optical weights can be obtained simply by changing the size of the pen nib. You could even go as far as change the widths of individual letters during typesetting to make text justification appear even smoother.

      METAFONT was never widely used for font design. The idea behind it was elegant, though, and is worth further examination, for example are there other ways of defining fonts parametrically and what sort of letter shapes would they produce. Below we describe one such attempt.

    Dynamic Wallpaper Editor – Desktop Slideshow Creator for Gnome

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    GNOME

    Dynamic Wallpaper Editor is a simply utility to create or edit background slideshows for Gnome Desktop.

    Different from other desktop wallpaper tools (e.g., Variety, Wallch.), Dynamic Wallpaper Editor can set duration of each picture and each transition separately or globally. The total duration can be 24 hours to do a wallpaper fitting the daylight.

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    GNOME: Performance and Sysprof

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    GNOME
    • The Latest GNOME Performance Issue Being Addressed Are OpenGL Pipeline Stalls

      The latest upstream GNOME performance shortcomings being investigated by prolific contributor Daniel Van Vugt of Canonical are OpenGL pipeline stalls.

      Van Vugt continues working on some terrific upstream contributions to GNOME for improving the default desktop of Ubuntu. As is the case with most of his GNOME work, it's in the area of bettering the performance by often addressing various long-standing bugs. On top of his other fixes so far for GNOME 3.34, he has been investigating OpenGL pipeline stalls most recently. These OpenGL pipeline stalls lead to frame skips and limiting the frame-rate when such situations occur.

    • Christian Hergert: Sysprof Updates

      I just uploaded the sysprof-3.33.4 tarball as we progress towards 3.34. This alpha release has some interesting new features that some of you may find interesting as you continue your quests to improve the performance of your system by improving the software running upon it.

      [...]

      Thanks to the West Coast Hackfest, I had a chance to sit down with Matthias and work through that design. GtkLabel was already using some accelerated text rendering so we started by making that work for GtkTextView. Then we extended the GSK PangoRenderer to handle the rest of the needs of GtkTextView and Matthias re-implemented some features to avoid cairo fallbacks.

    • Sysprof Picks Up Profiling Support For CPU Power Consumption

      GNOME's Sysprof profiler continues on a trajectory of becoming an incredibly versatile component for developers looking to maximize performance and efficiency under this desktop environment. Sysprof already picked up a number of new features for GNOME 3.34 but work is not yet finished.

      This cycle has seen GTK4 and other components supporting Sysprof's new engine and other work to narrow down performance bottlenecks within the code.

    KDE and GNOME: Cantor/GSoC, GXml and Development Sprint

    Filed under
    KDE
    GNOME
    • Markdown and support of embedded mathematics

      At this moment, the version of Discount added to Cantor’s repository had two additional functional fixes on top of the officially released version of this library. First, Discount copies all LaTeX expressions during the processing of markdown syntax to a special string list, which is then used by Cantor to search for LaTeX code. Second, a useful change was to add an ASCII non-text symbol to every math expression. This symbol is used as a search key which greatly reduces the likelihood for a string collision, still theoretically possible, though.

      For example, if Discount will find (according Markdown syntax) math expression $\Gamma$, then it will write the additional symbol and the expression iin the output html string will be $\Gamma$ and Cantor will search exactly this text.

      I think, that's all. Maybe this doesn’t look like a complex problem but solving this problem was a task that took the most time and it took me two months to fix it. So, I think the problem and its solution deserved a separate blog post.

    • GXml and on-the-fly-post-parsing technique

      I think this is new, so I’ll describe a new technique used in GXml to parse a large set of nodes in an XML document.

    • Sprint 4: tons of code reviews, improved web calendar discoverer

      After a fairly big push to reimplement the web calendar discoverer code, it landed in Calendar! The new code is a threaded implementation of a web discoverer where we first ping the server to see if the passed URL is an actual file; otherwise, we perform a full CalDAV discovery on the URL.

      Credentials are handled automatically — if the server rejects either the file or CalDAV checks due to permission, the user is asked about it.

      In addition to that, the Year view is now much optimized and we avoid a big amount of D-Bus traffic by caching the events that appear in the sidebar.

    An Overview of Debian 10 "Buster" from the GNOME Edition

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    GNOME
    Debian

    Debian 10 LTS, known as Buster, released with 7 desktop environments in 2019. This short article reveals the GNOME Edition for you. Unlike usual, I tried to break down the download pages more longer for you to give you clearer vision on what and where to download. I divided this article into 6 parts which talk about: ISOs, LTS, Calamares system installer, login sessions & RAM loads (fortunately, it's only ~800MiB right now!), user interface, and of course applications. I hope this overview helps everybody to reach Debian and try it as soon as possible. Happy reading!

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