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GNOME

scikit-survival 0.13 Released

Filed under
Software
GNOME
Sci/Tech

Today, I released version 0.13.0 of scikit-survival. Most notably, this release adds sksurv.metrics.brier_score and sksurv.metrics.integrated_brier_score, an updated PEP 517/518 compatible build system, and support for scikit-learn 0.23.

For a full list of changes in scikit-survival 0.13.0, please see the release notes.

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Another Intel 4K + GNOME Optimization Yields 5% Faster Render Times, 10% Lower Power Use

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GNOME
Ubuntu

Daniel van Vugt of Canonical who has been responsible for many GNOME performance optimizations in recent years has another tantalizing improvement under review.

Recently the Canonical developer has been working on improving the Intel graphics experience on GNOME particularly at 4K after he upgraded his display and was unimpressed by the current level of performance for this default Ubuntu desktop environment.

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Advice for getting started with GNOME

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GNOME

GNOME is one of the most popular Linux desktops today. It started as a humble desktop called the GNU Network Object Model Environment (GNOME) and was built on top of the GIMP GTK libraries. Its 1.0 release was announced in 1999, just two years after the project got started.

Today, the most widely used Linux distributions provide GNOME 3 as their graphical desktop, and it's a great place to start learning Linux. As with any open source desktop, GNOME is extremely amenable to customization. You can alter and add to GNOME until it best suits your unique style of work.

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GUADEC 2020 + Covid-19 = Online Conference

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GNOME

To be honest, I did’t alert too much what event happening around but I think GUADEC is worth to steal my attention because I am Gnome lover and this is good chances to join the event because this year, GUADEC 2020 will take place entirely online due to the COVID-19 pandemic. So you (me and someone else who far from europe) don’t need to go europe to join Tongue

This event is coming next month start from 22nd July - 28th July 2020. GUADEC, it’s a once-a-year event that brings us together to collaborate, celebrate, and learn; meet our colleagues and friends; and strengthen the most special part of the GNOME project.

Maybe most of participant actualy will be sad because unable see each other in person this year. But this will be open oppurtunity for someone who cannot affort for travel if held as usual but now they can!

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GNOME Shell UX Plans: The Bigger Picture

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GNOME

It’s hard to believe, but we’re coming up on 10 years of GNOME Shell. Though GNOME 3.0 wasn’t released until April of 2011, design and development were in full swing in mid-2010, and had been for some time.

Of course, the shell has not been standing still since then. Many important areas have been refined and iterated on since those early days, including the notifications, the app grid, and the system status area.

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Also: GNOME Shell Continues Eyeing Improvements As It Approaches 10 Years Old

Gnome: Tracker in Summer

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GNOME

Lots of effort is going into Tracker at the moment. I was waiting for a convenient time to blog about it all, but there isn’t a convenient moment on a project like this, just lots of interesting tasks all blocked on different things.

With the API changes mostly nailed down, our focus moved to making initial Tracker 3 ports of the libraries and apps that use Tracker. This is a crucial step to prove that the new design works as we expect, and has helped us to find and fix loads of rough edges. We want to work with the maintainers of each app to finish off these ports.

If you want to help, or just follow along with the app porting, the process is being tracked in this GNOME Initiatives issue.

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How to Make Ubuntu Look Like macOS in 5 Easy Steps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
GNOME
Ubuntu

Customization is one of the main reasons why I use Linux. There is no end to the kind of customization you can do to your desktop Linux. You can change icons, themes, change fonts, change terminals, add screenlets, indicator applets, extensions and what not.

We have covered numerous desktop customization tips and tricks on It’s FOSS. In this one, I’ll show you how to make Ubuntu look like macOS.

Many people use macOS because of its simplistic and elegant look. You may disagree with it but it remains a popular opinion. Even there are Linux distributions that have macOS like look and feel.

One of the readers requested us to show how to make Ubuntu look like macOS and hence we’ve created this tutorial. In fact, this is a good example to show the customization capability of desktop Linux.

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GNOME 3.36.3 Desktop Environment Released with Various Improvements

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GNOME

Coming five weeks after GNOME 3.36.2, the GNOME 3.36.3 stable update continues to fix bugs, update translations and add various other smaller improvements to the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment in an attempt to offer users a more stable and reliable release.

As expected with any point release, GNOME 3.36.3 addresses numerous bugs reported by users since previous versions across numerous components and apps, and updates many language translations.

But there are also some improvements. For example, the Mutter window manger adds better monitor screencast on X11, implements touch-mode detection for the X11 backend, and removes external keyboard detection from touch-mode heuristics.

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Refactoring GNOME Code and Porting to GtkBuilder

Filed under
Development
GNOME
  • [Older] Adwait Rawat: The project I’ll be working on

    Currently, when a game which needs a firmware to run is added to GNOME Games, the user has to manually make a new platforms directory (if it does not exist already), make a directory corresponding to the name of the firmware being added, then copy the firmware file and rename the firmware file to match what’s written in the core.

  • Adwait Rawat: Task 1: Refactor existing code

    First task towards completion of the GSoC project was to refactor existing code such that it can be used later in the project.

    Originally, GNOME-Games handled firmware checks directly through the retro core source. While refactoring, GNOME Games’ model of individual modules must be kept in mind. But firmware are predominantly used by retro consoles (libretro) such as Game Boy Advance, Famicom Entertainment System, Super NES etc. So, to not break the model an abstract was needed such that retro consoles are able to use the refactored code easily, keeping the new code generic such that it theoretically works for any given platform.

    To achieve this, a Core interface was made with abstract functions which will be used by the check sum code. But since Core is an interface, it can not have function bodies. Which is why a subclass called RetroCore was also made, which defines all the abstract prototypes defined in Core that will be used by retro platform.

    The reason an abstract was needed in the first place was because of the fact that a Retro.CoreDescriptor object is needed to conduct check sums of firmware. But because it’s a Retro class function, it will be against GNOME Games programming model. Hence the need for Core interface. Which is intended as a wrapper for Retro.CoreDescriptor. These wrappers are then defined in RetroCore and used when needed.

  • Apoorv Sachan: The First Milestone

    GTK+ supports the separation of user-interface layout from your business logic, by using UI descriptions in an XML format that can be parsed by the GtkBuilder class. So what GtkBuilder does is it processed a UI definition given in XML format and does all the heavy-lifting that needs to be done for allocating widegets, styling them ID-ing, packing etc. and than allows you to obtain a reference to the concerned widget in C code which allows for tweaking or manipulating the behaviour of the widget based on business logic. Thus importantly keeping the UI definitions seperate from the business logic. Thus very similar to what Bob The Builder does, takes a blueprint and turns it into real houses and building. GtkBuilder parses objects definitions in XML and creates real runtime objects of the same property, thus sparing us the part where we call the same functions again and again to create, destroy and style widgets.

Changing the world with open source: GNOME president shares her story

Filed under
OSS
GNOME

Growing up in Silicon Valley, Nuritzi Sanchez saw the powerful impact software can make on the world. Yet, unlike many others who were also steeped in the tech industry, her journey has taken her into the world of open source, where she is contributing to that impact.

After graduating from Stanford University with a degree in International Relations, she became a founding team member of open source computing company Endless OS, served three terms as president and chair of GNOME's board of directors, and in February 2020 was hired as the senior open source program manager (OSPM) at GitLab.

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SPDX for KF5/KF6 Status Update

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Gina Häußge and OctoPrint

Well, I found myself in the situation that I had this huge Open Source project on my hands that really was not a thing you could still do on the side, but I also had no funding. I could just have said, "well, okay then" and gotten myself a regular job again. No risk, steady paycheck. But not as exciting either. So, I did what just two or so years prior I had laughed off and decided to go self-employed. I figured I would probably kick myself for the rest of my life if I didn't even TRY to see if I could maybe continue working on OctoPrint full time funded through crowdfunding. So, I went for that. Set up a Patreon campaign, pushed out a "Call to Action" on all social feeds of the project and hoped for the best. Read more